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Using SSD with Lightroom

Profile Pictures is off-line
22 March 2015 05:25
profilepictures
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I didn't entirely understand wear on the ssd as a concept, but sandisk drives come with a bit of software designed to optimise their use and indicate percentage life left, which is a step ahead of conventional drives in terms of planning at least.


Ellesse Photography is off-lineSilver Member
22 March 2015 06:23
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Don't forget the Samsung 850 pro, about the same price and guarantee as the Sandisk, but with better longevity. The Sandisk can take up to 80TB (that's 22GB per day), while the Samsung is 150TB (that's for the 256GB variant, the 512GB & 1TB can handle 300TB). If you are using an SSD with constant read/writes, the Samsung wins hands down. I have both in my PC and the Samsung is a little faster in my opinion.


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
22 March 2015 13:15
RedChecker
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Quote from profilepictures
I didn't entirely understand wear on the ssd as a concept, but sandisk drives come with a bit of software designed to optimise their use and indicate percentage life left, which is a step ahead of conventional drives in terms of planning at least.



Wear-levelling will keep overwriting on top of all of the free space (rather than simply the first deleted files).  If you've got little free space it will obviously keep overwriting on top of the same bit of memory more often and you risk the memory 'locking' (which is what happens with flash memory).

If you've got enough SATA connectors and power connectors, IMO simply buying a cheap (and arguably disposable) dedicated SSD specifically for the task of LR catalogues (or PS scratch files) is a sensible move.  You can get a 60GB drive for ~£35, or 128GB for £46, a no brainer in my book and ample space on the drive to keep its usage low (mine's typically at around 40% used)

As for brands, they're pretty much all good.  I've owned Sandisk and Samsung, used Corsair and Kingston at work and people swear by Intel drives (they're often the most expensive)
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


DJ200 is off-line
23 March 2015 02:59
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This may be of use to help you decide where to put your various files...http://www.computer-darkroom.com/blog/will-an-ssd-improve-adobe-lightroom-performance/


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
23 March 2015 03:07
RedChecker
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Quote from DJ200
This may be of use to help you decide where to put your various files...http://www.computer-darkroom.com/blog/will-an-ssd-improve-adobe-lightroom-performance/



A bit naff as all they seem to be doing is working on 300 files that are presumably in the same folder within the catalogue.

For me (albeit on a PC), one of the most awkward things prior to putting the catalogue on the SSD was browsing through large folders as it took some time to load the thumbnails and was even more awkward going to browse other folders within the same catalogue, the whole thing was pretty sluggish simply to use as there were often pauses on the system while manually working on images.  The introduction of the SSD in my case made all of the browsing between folders very snappy and I no longer have to keep stopping what I'm doing to wait while working on individual images.

I can't comment on batch processing as I normally walk away when I have the need to do that, and besides, as I said earlier regarding SSD benefits over HDD, it's unlikely it will give a huge benefit for something like that as you're streaming large files back/forth and for the most part will be CPU based.  Browsing a catalogue will involve huge amounts of random reads/writes as it's effectively a database of sorts and is perfect for SSD utilisation.
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


Paul Riddell is off-line
23 March 2015 05:24
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As far as an SSD vs HDD is concerned to the average layman, you'll not see any difference with the SSD over the HDD asides from a massive speed increase. (plus cooler running and less noise)

But I wonder how much difference you'll see in a realistic, non written on paper sense if you are just using it as a storage device? I mean I know there will be a difference, but because it will be accessed so little in relative terms your perception will be different.

What you really want to do is run the SSD as your OS drive and use the HDD for storage.
That's when you'll see the massive differences.

Paul.
www.photographybyriddell.co.uk

www.photographybyriddell.co.uk


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
23 March 2015 05:32
RedChecker
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Quote from riddell
What you really want to do is run the SSD as your OS drive and use the HDD for storage.



Like I've said earlier, you use SSDs for whenever you need random access to be accelerated.  So this could be booting or data (obviously depending on the nature of the data and whether it needs to perform lots of small/random reads/writes).

There's no hard/fast rule for whether SSDs will be of a noticeable benefit for the extra outlay over mechanical drives.  If you boot your machine once for an all-day work session on a single application, then there's not much benefit in booting off of an SSD and you may as well use a mechanical drive (afterall, once it's booted & loaded into memory it'll unlikely need to keep accessing drivers etc) for the minute or so in the day you'lls save, on the other hand, if you're switching machines on/off rapidly or using multiple apps throughout the day then it will be of benefit.

The key is to finding the bottlenecks for YOUR system and how YOU use it.
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


Dave Beasley is off-line
27 March 2015 10:27
eosfan
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Thanks for all the advice, tips etc.
My Samsung 850 SSD is now installed and holding Lightroom catalogs and cache - certainly speeds certain activites up.

Now to think about replacing the OS drive with SSD.

Dave



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