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Photographing passing traffic

Ellesse Photography is off-lineSilver Member
06 October 2014 18:33
EllessePhotography
Photographer
EllessePhotography
Location
United Kingdom
Edinburgh
Edinburgh

While I wasn't photographing cars, I had my camera on a tripod by the side of a road in Glencoe. The amount of speeding cars that "suddenly slowed" was huge, the angry reactions from the drivers as they realized it wasn't a speed camera after all was priceless.


Razoir is off-line
08 October 2014 09:05
JeromeRazoir
Photographer
JeromeRazoir
Location
United Kingdom
Devon
Crediton

Quote from AlletunYL
No,it's completely legal. I have done this before. Although if people complain you can always be warned, cautioned or convicted for Harassment, alarm and distress, as with any type of street photography :-)



Sections 4 and 5 of the Public Order Act 1986. (I think '86, can't be arsed to check!). Very unlikely to attract an arrest under section 4 and section 5 requires a warning and then a continuance or repetition of the behaviour..

Nothing that I can think of in the Road Traffic Act UNLESS you stand on an island or a round about or distract the drivers. Do not get too close to the kerb. Remember that there are areas where pedestrians are not allowed. Motorways, obviously but manyh dual carriageways have a by-law forbidding pedestrians. Usually stated by a notice.

Also remember that the only lawful activity on a public highway is 'to proceed''. If you stop you are theoretically causing an obstruction and 'obstruction of the public highway' is an offence. You will almost certainly only be 'moved on' for that.

The best general advice when approached by a police officer is to be polite and friendly. Put the ball back in the officer's court by asking for advice.
Who but a jazz man would say of Bridget Bardot, "Man, what key is she in?"


Ian MACFADYEN is off-lineSilver Member
08 October 2014 13:16
Kiboko
Photographer
Kiboko
Location
United Kingdom
Surrey
GUILDFORD

Funny how times have changed and attitudes likewise. I retired from the police in 1998 having served in two different forces for over 31 years. One of the reasons I joined in the first place, and what would generally describe my attitude to the law, and the authority vested in me, was that I believed strongly in everyone's right to do what was one's right to do, - unimpeded, - after all, that was what my father and grandfather had fought for in the 1st & 2nd world wars, and I saw it as part of my responsibility and duty to uphold those rights. Ensuring the freedom of the public to engage in actions which were within the framework of the law was no less significant than prosecuting those who infringed it. On a number of occasions I dealt with complaints concerning photographers photographing people who objected to being photographed. In those instances in which photographers were photographing people in public places, the complainant would invariably have been told that the photographer had every right to photograph anyone in such a place. I would of course, have been sent to ascertain what indeed the photographer was in fact doing, so I would not have welcomed abuse or balshy behaviour directed towards me simply because I was doing my job! My written report regarding disposal of the incident was subject to perusal & checking by the chain of command, and it's clear that attitudes were quite different then, nobody would have dreamed of up-holding such a complaint. Little or nothing in law has changed regarding photography in public places, the only thing that has changed is the attitude towards it, and the more frequent suspicion it arouses as to the photographers' motive.


Anth is off-line
09 October 2014 10:29
1884photo
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
West Yorkshire
Wakefield

Take a tripod, it looks more like your surveying especially if you wear a flourescent vest!! I shoot for press and it's a tip i was taught years ago.


Ian Jackson is off-line
09 October 2014 10:40
brownnwhite
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
Kent


Just avoid shooting near a school or park to prevent the " man in a mac taking photos of young girls" headline appearing in the local paper
Its nice to be important but more important to be nice


Razoir is off-line
10 October 2014 07:46
JeromeRazoir
Photographer
JeromeRazoir
Location
United Kingdom
Devon
Crediton

Quote from Kiboko
Funny how times have changed and attitudes likewise. I retired from the police in 1998 having served in two different forces for over 31 years. One of the reasons I joined in the first place, and what would generally describe my attitude to the law, and the authority vested in me, was that I believed strongly in everyone's right to do what was one's right to do, - unimpeded, - after all, that was what my father and grandfather had fought for in the 1st & 2nd world wars, and I saw it as part of my responsibility and duty to uphold those rights. Ensuring the freedom of the public to engage in actions which were within the framework of the law was no less significant than prosecuting those who infringed it. On a number of occasions I dealt with complaints concerning photographers photographing people who objected to being photographed. In those instances in which photographers were photographing people in public places, the complainant would invariably have been told that the photographer had every right to photograph anyone in such a place. I would of course, have been sent to ascertain what indeed the photographer was in fact doing, so I would not have welcomed abuse or balshy behaviour directed towards me simply because I was doing my job! My written report regarding disposal of the incident was subject to perusal & checking by the chain of command, and it's clear that attitudes were quite different then, nobody would have dreamed of up-holding such a complaint. Little or nothing in law has changed regarding photography in public places, the only thing that has changed is the attitude towards it, and the more frequent suspicion it arouses as to the photographers' motive.



Nail, hammer: IMPACT!!! Nicely put Kiboko

I was a police reservist for 22 years and well remember a regular PC, with whom I was very friendly, saying in very angry tones, when he felt his office* was being abused, "We are servants of the people. Not instruments of the state." The vast majority of rozzers I have met, worked  with, been interviewed by (I had a job that led to quite a few of those!) take exactly that attutude.

The most important thing when dealing with der filth is what we call the attitude test. Act like a bolshy JeromeRazoir is a naughty person and you will be treated like a bolshy JeromeRazoir is a naughty person . Be pleasant and polite and very, very few rozzers will fail to be just as nice back.

* By which I mean his role, not the little room he does his paperwork in! A rozzer is, in the jargon, 'In the office of constable.'
Who but a jazz man would say of Bridget Bardot, "Man, what key is she in?"



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