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eos100d microphone recommendation ?

alex crawford is off-lineSilver Member
21 May 2014 11:03
alexcrawford
Photographer
alexcrawford
Location
United Kingdom
Essex
Chelmsford

hi all
im in need of recommendations for a microphone to attach to the eos 100d's hotshoe

the subject will be an interview from about 10ft away and a singer/concert at about 20ft
i need something fairly directional so it captures the front 90degrees (45 each side of central)
pretty well but attenuates quite well outside of that forward facing region.

sorry if ive left something really obvious out of the needs list
im not at all experienced in video

thanks al


Dave Beasley is off-line
21 May 2014 11:07
eosfan
Photographer
eosfan
Location
United Kingdom
Surrey
Guildford

Haven't tried video yet but from what I hear, Rode seem to be ok


alex crawford is off-lineSilver Member
21 May 2014 11:30
alexcrawford
Photographer
alexcrawford
Location
United Kingdom
Essex
Chelmsford

tks price of rode bit steep,
was hoping to spend max £75


alex crawford is off-lineSilver Member
21 May 2014 12:09
alexcrawford
Photographer
alexcrawford
Location
United Kingdom
Essex
Chelmsford



a vodeographer friend of friend just recommended a cheapo takstar 598

says very close to rode sound quality at throw away price according to her,

any ideas on that make ?


w4pictures is off-line
21 May 2014 18:10
w4pictures
Photographer
w4pictures
Location
United Kingdom
London
Chiswick

The standard video mic is the Sennheiser ME66, not brilliant but also not expensive.

If you only need it for one gig, then hire a Sennheiser MKH416P48 which would be much cheaper and better. But, its not what you've got but where you put it with microphones. If you can get someone to help, get the mic on the end of a cable closer to your interviewee for hugely improved results. Or do the interview in an empty cinema.

If the concert is acoustic, a less directional mic would be better. Just remember not to move the camera or the axis characteristics will change. If there are already mics there, you will be better off asking for a feed from the PA mixer and running that to your camera or, better still, to a separate recorder which would allow the camera to move about.


Laurence Power is off-line
23 May 2014 05:59
LaurenceJPower
Photographer
LaurenceJPower
Location
United Kingdom
Surrey
Esher

For concert use the best way is to take a feed from the desk and mix that with mics placed overhead, that will give you atmosphere sound. You will need to then delay the sound from the desk to match the acoustic sound.

If the concert is totally acoustic, grab a couple of AKG C1000's use them in crossed pair configeration about 10 feet from the subject placed fairly high (10-15ft) if you can. Another mic placed facing back will add the reverberation from the venue.

For handhelod interview work an SM58 will give you a nice presence, is robust and can be fitted with a branded windshield. If the mics are to be hidden, lavalier/tieclip mics of any brand should do although wind can be a problem as they are omnis. If you can get a sound guy/girl in, a Sennheiser, or AKG shotgun in a dougal,is what the pros use.

Really if you want to make a decent job of this hire the audio gear as required - check out vid4hire for their packages or Richmond Film services
Laurence J. Power


Matthew G is off-line
23 May 2014 06:06
MG
Photographer
MG
Location
United Kingdom
Warwickshire


If you went down the road of plugging in to desk then don't forget most desks provide only dual mono sound... i.e. the same comes out of left to right channel. If you ask most sound engineers that are manning the desks if they are stereo they say yes but pretty much all small gigs use the mono desks. Its only large venues that have a need for them. Also, not all feeds go through the desk at all times. Drums sometimes don't go through them for example. I'm speaking from experience rather than what is right or wrong... As others have said you need a good mix of sounds to get it right. Don't shoot an interview from 10 feet away and rely on a microphone from your camera. Most interviews I shoot would be with a remote microphone.



Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
23 May 2014 06:15
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

Anyone else get the impression that the OP's equipment & budget for this is going to be way out of his depth, LOL!

Nobody's mentioned using an external high-bit recorder with timecode connected to a suitably equiped timecode enabled camera yet either, just sayin'
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


w4pictures is off-line
23 May 2014 07:13
w4pictures
Photographer
w4pictures
Location
United Kingdom
London
Chiswick

Could be, but £75 hires a lot of kit.

Simply, a Fostex FR2LE parked by the PA desk and an interview mic (£30) would probably do the job fine although its hard to guess what the circs are in terms of ambient sound, and £45 left for enough lager to forget the experience.


alex crawford is off-lineSilver Member
05 June 2014 03:43
alexcrawford
Photographer
alexcrawford
Location
United Kingdom
Essex
Chelmsford

thanks to all those that made positive suggestions.
the kit has now been tested and is working well.
i have added to the kit-list a clip-on interview mic as
its a hugely good idea, tku.
thanks again, alex





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