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D800e - 2 antialiasing filters?

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22 February 2014 16:40
PaulManuell
Photographer


I'm a bit confused with this one. When the D800 and D800e were launched, I understood the difference to be that the 'e' model had no AA filter. However, I've recently read that it actually has 2 of them, with one of them cancelling the other out. There was, though, no explanation for the reason why 2 filters are used to achieve the same effect as having no filter at all. Surely 2 filters, even cancelling each other out, permit less light to reach the sensor, which is definitely a detrimental quality as far as I can see. Are 2 used rather than none to protect the sensor from dust, maybe? Would appreciate someone explaining Nikon's reasoning for 2 filters, please.


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
22 February 2014 16:47
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

Nikons own page about the camera goes some way in trying to explain this:

http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/d800/features01.htm#a12
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


22 February 2014 17:52
PaulManuell
Photographer


Thanks for that, Red Checker. Unfortunately, I only have a basic phone with internet, and that site won't load on it.


Andy_B is off-lineSilver Member
22 February 2014 17:54
Andy_B
Photographer
Andy_B
Location
United Kingdom
London
London

They have to pass the light through the same amount of glass as the 'non-E' version, otherwise they'd possibly have to do more radical re-engineering including re-positioning the sensor. Instead of using horizontal then vertical splitting filters, they use a horizontal splitting then a horizontal joining filter - so the optical path of the light is very similar but no antialiasing blur occurs.

It's good to have a glass/filter slightly in front of the sensor, as the further from the sensor the filter is, the softer the shadow a dust particle will cast (at wide apertures). With no filter at all the effect of dust would be a lot more visible.




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