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Dynamic Range

Len Maynard is off-line
20 February 2014 12:30
Skid2
Photographer
Skid2
Location
United Kingdom
Cheshire
Stockport

Does anyone use the dynamic range of there camera to maximise the tonal range of their images and reduce the post production time.

If so how did you calibrate your DR and did you relay the information back to your light meter to reduce the chance of clipping when using the light-meter either in the studio of on location.
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Peter Reime is off-lineSilver Member
20 February 2014 12:52
Preime
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
East Sussex
Brighton

Not sure I fully understand your question. The dynamic range of your camera relates to the tonal range you can capture with the sensor and output as a RAW file. This doesn't change,regardless of settings used. There is nothing to calibrate and the lightmeter in the camera is already set to maximise the DR of the sensor.


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
20 February 2014 14:37
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

I intended to work like this with my Sekonic L-758D with the mk1 calibration target they sell (mk2 wasn't available when I bought it) but unfortunately it's damn-near impossible to use for flash work. The mk2 corrects this and makes it easily do-able but I'll be damned if I'm spending another £150 on one. That said I've recently discovered that X-Rite Passport cards can be used to perform the same function (which I have) so some day I'll get off my backside and have a go.

As to whether or not I would actually use it regularly, it's unlikely, primarily because I almost always balance with ambient and with cloudy British weather I don't have the luxury of faffing about to get that perfect exposure and I don't think my work warrants it. I can see it being useful for interior architectural photography or where you have large sets.
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


redbaron is off-lineSilver Member
20 February 2014 15:39
redbaron
Photographer
redbaron
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

Skid you sound like the sort of chap who would love Guy Gowan personally I'm content with simply shooting to the right the odd stop then pulling back in development. When I remember. Snag is I'm so ingrained with seeking to get it right in camera that if feels all wrong.
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OldMaster is off-line
20 February 2014 16:18
OldMaster
Photographer
OldMaster
Location
United Kingdom
Hertfordshire
Harpenden

You don't have the benefits with digital we had with film...(push/pull) and you are stuck with the DR the sensor is capable of which decreases with increasing iso. You should aim to expose for highlight retention as you would do with positive emulsions such as slide material. RAW processing may pull in more detail in the shadows. In terms of metering the incident method would usually be preferred for exposure measurement but is not that convenient! As ever, if in doubt bracket and always use the histogram?

For some subject types you have the powerful tool of fill flash...preserving the highlights and lifting the shadows to ensure a DR that "fits"....


raw and the cooked is off-line
21 February 2014 02:52
Rawandthecooked
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
London


Want the highest dynamic range? Then it's a fuji S5 pro, or a Nikon d800…….


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
21 February 2014 03:27
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

Quote from Rawandthecooked
Want the highest dynamic range? Then it's a fuji S5 pro, or a Nikon d800…….



Have you looked at dxomark.com? The S5 is quite a way down in the list for dynamic range, the Fuji bodies aren't class leaders any more for DR.

If I hadn't invested in so much Canon gear I'd have a D800 without hesitation. I've seen photos my boss took with his of his kids against the sun on his Caribbean holiday and the exposure's perfect, nothing blown/washed out, the tonal range is astonishing.
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


Profile Pictures is off-line
21 February 2014 04:58
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictures
Location
United Kingdom
Suffolk
Bury St Edmunds

I'm just confused here. What's to be calibrated? Your sensor has a native dynamic range and you then choose exposure to suit your own requirements. Some go ettr others meter the middle, some aim to underexpose a fraction..but the dynamic range of the sensor doesn't change.

Are you hinting at HDR with multiple exposures taken? Or am I really missing something here?


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
21 February 2014 05:04
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

Quote from profilepictures
I'm just confused here. What's to be calibrated? Your sensor has a native dynamic range and you then choose exposure to suit your own requirements. Some go ettr others meter the middle, some aim to underexpose a fraction..but the dynamic range of the sensor doesn't change. Are you hinting at HDR with multiple exposures taken? Or am I really missing something here?



Some light meters (Sekonic L-758D for example) can actually be calibrated to any given camera to actually understand the camera's dynamic range.  Once this is done it can display multiple meter readings on a chart, along with the absolute limits of the camera's dynamic range (as well as 'safe' limits).  The OP is asking whether anyone has metered using this (I think) or by observation of what their camera is capable of (along with meter readings).

We're not talking about simply calibrating a meter to match the camera's understanding of 18% grey.
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


Profile Pictures is off-line
21 February 2014 05:12
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictures
Location
United Kingdom
Suffolk
Bury St Edmunds

Ah right, thanks checker.

I've no bloody idea why it's a big issue now though, without an external light meter the cameras own gubbins seem to be guide enough to shoot a brides dress In bright sun or a necked lass in front of a lighthouse at night pretty well. HDR is easily achievable if you like that malarkey, so what's the point then?



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