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Camera Comparisons

Steve Guy is off-line
30 October 2013 08:01
Sdeve
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
Derbyshire
Derby

I decided it was time to upgrade my bridge camera. Looking around on the internet it seemed that they all have their pros and cons (sounds like my social life!). So, in the end I bought, for better or worse, a Fuji SL1000, having been very impressed by the Fuji S9600 I was looking to upgrade on.

Following that purchase I had a bit of a session test shooting both Fujis and comparing the results alongside my K20D. The conclusion was that in many respects there was little to choose between them in practical results. I was reminded of a description I read of the average HiFi nut in the days of those round black things called LPs. They spend a fortune on the hardware and then have a half dozen test records and an LP collection that they listen to mainly to check the silences between the noisy bits rather than enjoying the music.

In photography terms, it's a bit like spending more time analysing the colour / white balance, grain structure under immense enlargement, and other technicalities while ignoring the possibility that the picture has no artistic merits whatever. Composition is all, IMO. OK, professionals, and I mean those who actually earn all their living from photography, may need to concentrate on the technicalities, but I suspect that even for them, the most important thing is that their camera produces acceptably accurate results every time they press the shutter release.

I certainly found the SL1000 up to snuff for the sort of use I require of it. The only issue I had was the constant amazement that some utter berk at Fuji decided there was no need to have a facility for a lens hood, the most basic and effective photographic accessory of all time.


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
30 October 2013 08:08
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

If you're one of those people who don't care about techical aspects then surely you should simply get to a decent camera shop and see what one feels best in your hands.

Personally the technical aspects are the deal breaker for me (and I'm sure many others) as I know from experience that anything pro-sumer or pro-grade will have superb handling (the only exception to this was when I tried a 'Blad H3D but that's another story), and IMO it's the finer details such as noise, sharpness, dynamic range etc. that distinguish cameras of the level I'm looking.

For the record, I've never bought a camera by trying it first.
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


Steve Guy is off-line
30 October 2013 08:26
Sdeve
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
Derbyshire
Derby

Quote from RedChecker
If you're one of those people who don't care about techical aspects then surely you should simply get to a decent camera shop and see what one feels best in your hands.

Personally the technical aspects are the deal breaker for me (and I'm sure many others) as I know from experience that anything pro-sumer or pro-grade will have superb handling (the only exception to this was when I tried a 'Blad H3D but that's another story), and IMO it's the finer details such as noise, sharpness, dynamic range etc. that distinguish cameras of the level I'm looking.

For the record, I've never bought a camera by trying it first.



'One of those people'? A bit (quite a bit actually)patronising but perhaps unintentional, so never mind.

Every camera I've ever bought I have handled first. My interest lay in getting the best bang for the bucks, which, of course, has to include the technical specs. I was just pointing out that a photographer equipped with the most basic, but functional camera, can produce images that will knock the socks off those produced by an inept and artistically incompetent photographer who happens to be able to afford the very best that Japan has to offer.


Neil Anderson is off-line
30 October 2013 08:33
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
Location
United Kingdom
London
West London

Quote from Sdeve
I decided it was time to upgrade my bridge camera. Looking around on the internet it seemed that they all have their pros and cons (sounds like my social life!). So, in the end I bought, for better or worse, a Fuji SL1000, having been very impressed by the Fuji S9600 I was looking to upgrade on.

Following that purchase I had a bit of a session test shooting both Fujis and comparing the results alongside my K20D. The conclusion was that in many respects there was little to choose between them in practical results. I was reminded of a description I read of the average HiFi nut in the days of those round black things called LPs. They spend a fortune on the hardware and then have a half dozen test records and an LP collection that they listen to mainly to check the silences between the noisy bits rather than enjoying the music.

In photography terms, it's a bit like spending more time analysing the colour / white balance, grain structure under immense enlargement, and other technicalities while ignoring the possibility that the picture has no artistic merits whatever. Composition is all, IMO. OK, professionals, and I mean those who actually earn all their living from photography, may need to concentrate on the technicalities, but I suspect that even for them, the most important thing is that their camera produces acceptably accurate results every time they press the shutter release.

I certainly found the SL1000 up to snuff for the sort of use I require of it. The only issue I had was the constant amazement that some utter berk at Fuji decided there was no need to have a facility for a lens hood, the most basic and effective photographic accessory of all time.



Clearly it depends what and why you are taking photographs. For many people a mobile phone pretty much meets their needs (and budget). If your camera suits your requirements then that's lovely, but there is no reason to think that your requirements would be the same as many other people.
I can't really see the point of your post - do you expect everyone (or anyone) to say 'wow thanks!'

It seems rather pretentious to claim that you need a bridge camera to achieve a decent composition - surely a smart phone should be enough for anyone.
Using a more limited camera as a matter of principle is more like insisting on recording music on two tracks because that's all you need for stereo (or isn't mono really enough to capture the spirit of the music) whilst claiming that 24 track recording is a waste of money.
Like any dealer he was watching for the card that is so high and wild he'll never need to deal another...


Steve Guy is off-line
30 October 2013 09:01
Sdeve
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
Derbyshire
Derby

Quote from stolenfaces


Clearly it depends what and why you are taking photographs. For many people a mobile phone pretty much meets their needs (and budget). If your camera suits your requirements then that's lovely, but there is no reason to think that your requirements would be the same as many other people.
I can't really see the point of your post - do you expect everyone (or anyone) to say 'wow thanks!'

It seems rather pretentious to claim that you need a bridge camera to achieve a decent composition - surely a smart phone should be enough for anyone.
Using a more limited camera as a matter of principle is more like insisting on recording music on two tracks because that's all you need for stereo (or isn't mono really enough to capture the spirit of the music) whilst claiming that 24 track recording is a waste of money.




I can't really see the point of your reply. None of it reflects accurately what I've said, or why I was saying it. I have not made any such claim as you suggest, nor have I proposed any such principle. As for expectation of a response, I had none and didn't express any. It was just an observation. If you don't care for it then I can only suggest you spend your time responding to posts that you do care for. That way we each may spend our time in accordance with our interests.



Neil Anderson is off-line
30 October 2013 09:13
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
Location
United Kingdom
London
West London

Quote from Sdeve


I can't really see the point of your reply. None of it reflects accurately what I've said, or why I was saying it. I have not made any such claim as you suggest, nor have I proposed any such principle. As for expectation of a response, I had none and didn't express any. It was just an observation. If you don't care for it then I can only suggest you spend your time responding to posts that you do care for. That way we each may spend our time in accordance with our interests.





What did you say then ? I can only see you saying that an expensive camera doesn't make you a better photographer which is of course true. But why do you think a Bridge camera isn't unnecessarily expensive but an SLR is ?

To me composition also includes depth of field, your abilities in this area are going to be somewhat limited with a bridge camera.
Like any dealer he was watching for the card that is so high and wild he'll never need to deal another...


Profile Pictures is off-line
30 October 2013 10:29
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictures
Location
United Kingdom
Suffolk
Bury St Edmunds

Blimey, it's like asking someone the time then walking off as they pull their jumper back from their wrist.

I'd suggest you tell us stuff, it'll save anyone wasting time trying to be helpful answering a question.


30 October 2013 11:43
shapeman
Photographer


I have seen great images produced on a £20 camera off Ebay & back in the 30's, 40's etc some of our most respected Photographers plied their trade with fantastic results.

So what makes a great image

Camera
Lens
Photographer

I also prefer light as my basic accessory

If everyone demanded peace instead of another television set, then there'd be peace. John Lennon


TarMoo is off-line
30 October 2013 12:00
tarmoo
Photographer
tarmoo
Location
United Kingdom
Kent
Chatham

Buying a camera is only a small part of the investment required over a number of years. Lenses, dedicated flash units etc can cost thousands. You are buying into a system, so choose a brand which has the best selection of lenses and other accessories and us likely to be around in ten years time. I would suggest Nikon or Canon are the best bets. You will waste a lot of money by switching brands all the time. Choose one brand and stick with it.
Q: How to make a small fortune from photography? A: Start with a large fortune.


Chaz is off-line
31 October 2013 09:13
ChazPhotos
Photographer
ChazPhotos
Location
United Kingdom
Devon
Cullompton

Quote from shapeman
I have seen great images produced on a £20 camera off Ebay & back in the 30's, 40's etc some of our most respected Photographers plied their trade with fantastic results.

So what makes a great image

Camera
Lens
Photographer

I also prefer light as my basic accessory




I think you have this the wrong way around
Photographer has to be first then lens camera is last.
The photographer mind and eye are whats impotent, with out this you cant start.

AS for bridge camera well they work for snaps but after that I think it a bit of luck, you never get wildlife or sports with such a shutter delay.
I think a entry level dSLR will do much better in the hands of a good photographer, add a good lens and your there.




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