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Street Photography

Barney Allen is off-line
31 May 2013 15:59
BarneyAllen
Photographer
BarneyAllen
Location
United Kingdom
North Yorkshire
Harrogate

Stefan, as I rarely check these forums I'm late coming to the party on this one but thought I'd add my tuppence worth.

before you venture out, decide on what street photography means to you. Just because a photo is taken on the street doesn't make it 'street photography' nor does 'street photography' have to be taken on the street. It's a genre, and like all genres has various definitions. The definition I came up with is "the capturing of a decisive moment in a public place within the context of the environment of the subject."

Far too many people completely misunderstand the importance of genre and merely take uninteresting shots without thinking. By having a definition in mind your can approach street photography with more purpose and then produce better as a result.

I run a Street Photography group for the North of England on Flickr -[url=URL http://www.flickr.com/groups/northernstreetphotography/"]Northern Street Photography on Flickr[/url] and have a Twitter feed too: [url=URL http://www.flickr.com/groups/northernstreetphotography/"]Northern Street Photography on Twitter[/url]


ALISTAIR SHANKIE is off-line
31 May 2013 16:37
shank_ali
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
County Durham
billingham,cleveland

I attended an editorial meet up hosted by Getty and sponsored by Canon in London in May 2011.It was both interesting and informative.The stall holders around Covent Garden were quite receptive as were the people of Chinatown.If you ask for there name,it helps with the caption,you may receive it.If you dont ask the persons name who is the focus of your photograph,then your never going to find out.Mr or Mrs X busking outside Charring Cross tells us little.I had a great chat once with a street cleaner in Brighton.He had a background in engineering ,like myself,and happily posed and gave me his name.
I also remember walking through the entrance of Canary Wharf in the April of the same year and the security guard having a dicky fit when he spotted the camera and tripod.He got on his walkie talkie and said "There a tourist coming down the road taking a few photographs".I did point to the hotel i was staying at and never mentioned my intention to shoot office buildings for editorial.I got my shots.
If you do find a nice busy spot with lots of people and activiy then why walk around looking for 'The shot' when if your patient something of interest may well appear at where your stood


Barney Allen is off-line
31 May 2013 17:40
BarneyAllen
Photographer
BarneyAllen
Location
United Kingdom
North Yorkshire
Harrogate

Quote from shank_aliIf you ask for there name,it helps with the caption,you may receive it.If you dont ask the persons name who is the focus of your photograph,then your never going to find out.Mr or Mrs X busking outside Charring Cross tells us little.



In street photography, or any kind of portraiture for that matter, if you have to ask for the name of the subject then your shot doesn't work.

Portraits taken in the street are not 'street photography' in the sense of the genre.

Also, shots of buskers are up there with photos of the homeless and shooting through the window of a cafe at someone drinking cofee as the top three shots taken by people thinking they are creating street photography who don't understand it at all.


01 June 2013 18:45
laylarc
Model


From a model/woman walking down the street perspective - I love street photography, but I hate people clicking away at me without asking. Which doesnt really make sense!

But if I see a calm, confident photographer minding his/her own business (as much as you can when you're watching the public) and not being creepy (as in following girls around) then I'm not really bothered.

Being quick & confident with your camera counts for a lot. A sweaty, nervous bloke with a camera looks like a perv, even if he's photographing buildings. A calm, confident guy that quickly takes a snap or two and then moves on is less bothersome.

Personally, I have the utmost respect for those that can carry it off, and the utmost venom for people that barge in all intrusive & weird.

Ballsy flattery works on me. "Hi, you girls look amazing, just a few shots?" works better than "Excuse me, may I take your picture?"

It does take balls to do street photography


EDIT - as a street photographer I'm sure you're not just photographing girls. Just my view on it.


Gordon Scammell is off-line
02 June 2013 03:51
tref
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
Essex


Had the pleasure of watching Martin Parr work a crowd at an event last week. He walked around slowly, spotted an opportunity, took the shot (with flash) checked the screen and then slowly walked away. If he didn't get what he wanted he would stay and carry on shooting until he was happy. At no time did he ask anything or make any contact with the subject - even when the subject was staring at him. Watched him for over an hour. Fascinating.
Gordon Scammell


Bill Haley is off-lineSilver Member
02 June 2013 12:10
pompeytog
Photographer
pompeytog
Location
United Kingdom
Hampshire
Portsmouth

Quote from xsab46
When I started doing street photography in London I found it very difficult to photograph strangers. I would go out for a day and take a couple of photographs, but I persevered and then suddenly everything 'clicked' and had no problem after that. I am quite happy to walk up to within a couple of meters of people and photograph them. I never try and be sneaky as that can get peoples backs up, and I will always give a cheery smile to anyone I photograph. I have gone full circle now and take very few photos as I keep seeing what what I have photographed before, and want to do something fresh. I am trying to break out of my particular 'style' of street photography. What you have to do when you photograph is have the courage to take the shot, but first to see/anticipate the shot and react/compose in a fraction of a second. I always shoot in bursts of 3-4 shots as subtle differences in the way people are integrating with each other/the environment/changes in expression can make the photo. Some people don't use the viewfinder and this takes practice. I nearly always use the viewfinder and walk around with camera at chest height so that I can quickly get my camera to my eye. My London street photography http://www.flickr.com/photos/daniel_c_c/sets/72157603892001049/show/ In short, persevere and find your way of doing street. As with everything it is practice. You are doing one of the most difficult forms of photography there probably is.









Just spent half an hour thoroughly enjoying these images. Very inspiring and thanks very much for sharing them. Great work Danny.
How hard can it be?


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
02 June 2013 12:15
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

Haven't read through so don't know if someone's mentioned it but the BBC produced a documentary a few years ago called "The Genius of Photography". In it there were snippets of Joel Meyerowitz at work on the streets of NY woth his Leica and those few clips gave a wonderful insight into the working of a great street photographer. It's about £12 on DVD and well worth having for anyone with a general interest in photography.
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


Paul Jones is off-line
02 June 2013 16:36
Paul_Jones
Photographer
Paul_Jones
Location
United Kingdom
Lancashire
Wigan

Quote from RedChecker
The BBC produced a documentary a few years ago called "The Genius of Photography". In it there were snippets of Joel Meyerowitz at work on the streets of NY woth his Leica and those few clips gave a wonderful insight into the working of a great street photographer. It's about £12 on DVD and well worth having for anyone with a general interest in photography.



Good one Steven.  It's an excellent DVD.  I've watched it a few times now.

'The Genius Of Photography' DVD on Amazon -   http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B001VIR81E/?tag=paujon-21

'The Genius Of Photography' Book on Amazon -  http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1844006093/?tag=paujon-21

Best regards
Paul

www.PaulJones.org (Glamour / Portraits / NSFW)



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