External Hard Drives

External Hard Drives

31 posts
19 Feb 2015
dannyrich
Photographer
dannyrich
I bought 2 2TB Iomega drives one was replaced straight out of the box and then they both ended up dying within a week of each other.

Since then I have bought a 3TB WD drive which I am more than happy with and plan to buy a 4TB drive soon.

Posted 27 Feb 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
dannyrich

I bought 2 2TB Iomega drives one was replaced straight out of the box and then they both ended up dying within a week of each other.


The problem with the likes of Iomega, Lacie, Buffalo & Freecom etc. is that you don't know exactly who manufactures the hard disks inside them. 

And furthermore, for all external drives (with USB interface) it may not actually be the drive that's failed but the USB interface itself (had this happen in work years ago with a Maxtor drive)
Posted 27 Feb 2015
Kizer
Photographer
Kizer
ait ssd drives taking over now.

they are more expensive at the moment

Posted 27 Feb 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Kizer

ait ssd drives taking over now. they are more expensive at the moment


As a primary drive for booting or intense working yes, they are superior due to their speed.

They will, however never surpass mechanical drives for capacity,cost effectiveness and longevity and will never be a suitable drive for archiving.
Posted 28 Feb 2015
PHP_Photography
Photographer
PHP_Photography
RedChecker

They will, however never surpass mechanical drives for capacity,cost effectiveness and longevity and will never be a suitable drive for archiving.

Not true.

Posted 28 Feb 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
PHP_Photography

Not true.



Perhaps saying 'never' was a bit much, but at this moment in time they're certainly not and I cannot imagine will be in the forseeable future.

One thing that eludes many is the belief that flash memory can retain data indefinitely.  While mechanical hard drives only have a finite data integrity lifespan of around 10-20 years (say), flash memory is (to my knowledge) more in the region of 5-10 years.

Another point is that flash memory can easily corrupt of the electronics fail.  At least with a mechanical hard drive the actual mechanical platters can be removed and read by specialists using ultra sensitive equipment (at great cost of course), but this also arguably pushes the longevity of mechanical systems further still (although risky to assume they can indeed recover the data).
Posted 28 Feb 2015
Edited by RedChecker 28 Feb 2015
gwentman
Photographer
gwentman
On the basis that anything can be lost or damaged, the archiving of images certainly favours the neg / pos film system no matter how outdated you may think it is.
My negative / slide collection has so far outlasted any digital storage I have and will still do so far into the future.

Mike.

Posted 28 Feb 2015
Gerry99111
Photographer
Gerry99111
gwentman

On the basis that anything can be lost or damaged, the archiving of images certainly favours the neg / pos film system no matter how outdated you may think it is. My negative / slide collection has so far outlasted any digital storage I have and will still do so far into the future. Mike.


Only if you only have one storage device.

The whole point of backing up is you have multiple devices in more than one location. What is important is the data or image, not what it is stored on. As long as you can replace a storage device as it fails with another one without losing the data, your images will be kept for ever.

Can't say that about negatives or slides which rot and can be ruined or lost by events that happen in every day life.
Posted 28 Feb 2015
gwentman
Photographer
gwentman
Gerry99111

Only if you only have one storage device.

The whole point of backing up is you have multiple devices in more than one location. What is important is the data or image, not what it is stored on. As long as you can replace a storage device as it fails with another one without losing the data, your images will be kept for ever.

Can't say that about negatives or slides which rot and can be ruined or lost by events that happen in every day life.


Computers get stolen, carbon from combustion takes its toll in a house fire and the stress / worry of losing your images seem less than ideal considering the ongoing rigours of daily life.
Properly washed, negatives last a lifetime and are cherished (sometimes) long berore they "rot" (exception being celluloid stock but we live and learn).
Hard drives? Can't see myself being overenthused by one in particular.
Mike.

Posted 28 Feb 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
gwentman

Computers get stolen, carbon from combustion takes its toll in a house fire and the stress / worry of losing your images seem less than ideal considering the ongoing rigours of daily life.
Properly washed, negatives last a lifetime and are cherished (sometimes) long berore they "rot" (exception being celluloid stock but we live and learn).
Hard drives? Can't see myself being overenthused by one in particular.
Mike.



If you lose your negatives in a fire or they're stolen you're buggered.

At least digital storage can be perfectly replicated and kept in multiple locations, say leaving the odd backup drive with a trusted relative or on a commercial level at a different site.  Certain backup solutions are designed/intended for long-term storage like the M-Disc standard (DVD & BluRay,8GB and 25GB respectively) which allegedly has a 1000 year life span.
Posted 28 Feb 2015
Edited by RedChecker 28 Feb 2015
MG
Photographer
MG
Funky
WD are good and reliable.  I have four over ten years and haven't had any problems.  My last one was bought from a supermarket called T*** online as they were the cheapest.  A computer engineer friend of mine says to avoid S****** as they were once good, but now bought out by a "make 'em cheap and nasty" firm and are now unreliable.  (S******  - think Ocean and closing a gap in the fence).  He also says not to look at cheaper options if you value your data.
Out of interest what made you think that you werent allowed to mention names of shops or brands on here?
Posted 2 March 2015
mph
Photographer
mph
Ignoring the professionals who need to keep stuff safe - and family shots which you may consider irreplaceable - how many have got say 500 shots which are not printed which would be a disaster if they were lost Just to be provocative!
Posted 2 March 2015
Carpe_Diem
Photographer
Carpe_Diem
Rule of thumb for me after having two drives, one internal seagate and one external WD fail within the space of a few days of one another is if you're going to buy one hdd, buy two and back your stuff up as many times as you're able

Always have in the back of your mind that what ever make you buy, it will fail usually when you're least expecting it



Posted 2 March 2015
anthonyh
Photographer
anthonyh
My Seagate and WD drives have been problem free. I still have a 12 yr old Powermac with 4 ancient HDs in it that work faultlessly.....can't remember what the drives are...I think one was WD and another Hitachi. The reality is that HDs are now relatively cheap so there is no excuse really for not backing up ones files. I have a simple method with my iMac.....Time machine backs up the internal HD, and the external drives I keep image files on, to a WD drive....and another drive backs up the WD drive. I could, I suppose, back up the last drive to cloud storage as well. And I still have folders full of negs....
Posted 10 March 2015
marlhamphoto
Photographer
marlhamphoto
A drive failed in my laptop on Sunday - I was unable to access it via windows and I got a nasty noise when I tried rebooting. Low level diagnostics said it was buggered. So I opened up the laptop and guess what - SEAGATE SSHD 1TB hybrid drive. Around 5 months old.

Posted 10 March 2015
Edited by marlhamphoto 10 March 2015
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