Ticks & Tick Bites - be very careful.

Ticks & Tick Bites - be very careful.

25 posts
1 June 2014
tonycsm
Photographer
tonycsm
I must confess the only tick removal that I've actually seen in action was with the lighted end of cigarette held closely to them...  It's not meant to kill them, just close enough to make them uncomfortable and to get them to release their hold and it worked perfectly on these occasions. 

Ticks are very common where there is Bracken especially where there have been sheep grazing - I remember a few students at uni getting them on geological field trips whilst wearing shorts on higher ground - shorts.... not the wisest thing to wear in tick country! 

No matter what you do, there is always something out there just waiting to get you.

Scottish midges are like flying Pirahna ....nastly little blighters they are!
Posted 2 June 2014
I feel quite "lucky" that I don't think I've had a tick bite, I say "don't think" because I did have a couple of odd skin irritations in the past and after explaining them to friends they have said that if it was a tick I would know about it. I didn't really think they were common at all and it wasn't something I worried about until a friend/model mentioned to me that she had a got a tick bite on a shoot the previous day - 4 years ago … She was shooting in an area I've shot in countless times before. I've shot in sheep fields and in areas highly populated with deer and never had any issues.

Perhaps ticks are like midges? they have a preference or can sniff out the blood/skin they desire more. I've only ever really had an issues with midges once on a shoot, they were pretty vicious and left me with pretty severe marks for days but most of the time when its midge seasons the photographer will be stood there with his camera in hand swearing at the little beasts swatting them away and I'm a few feet from him posing with no clothes on and getting no attention at all from the midges.

Posted 2 June 2014
arkady001
Photographer
arkady001
Chrissie_Red

I feel quite "lucky" that I don't think I've had a tick bite, I say "don't think" because I did have a couple of odd skin irritations in the past and after explaining them to friends they have said that if it was a tick I would know about it. I didn't really think they were common at all and it wasn't something I worried about until a friend/model mentioned to me that she had a got a tick bite on a shoot the previous day - 4 years ago … She was shooting in an area I've shot in countless times before. I've shot in sheep fields and in areas highly populated with deer and never had any issues. Perhaps ticks are like midges? they have a preference or can sniff out the blood/skin they desire more. I've only ever really had an issues with midges once on a shoot, they were pretty vicious and left me with pretty severe marks for days but most of the time when its midge seasons the photographer will be stood there with his camera in hand swearing at the little beasts swatting them away and I'm a few feet from him posing with no clothes on and getting no attention at all from the midges.


Could be: I'm O-Pos and bugs love me, but when my wife is around, she gets bitten to buggery and beyond and I get nothing. Canada was the worst: mossies like Heinkel bombers which can suck a man dry - or to the point of anemia in 24 hours. We used gallons of DEET over there: on our clothes, skin everywhere... then discovered it melts any watch faces not made of real crystal as well as the plastic furniture on military weapons systems...lol
Ticks - UK ticks are pretty easy to get off if you don't mind small scars - I take a pragmatic approach and dig them out ASAP then douse with alcohol or iodine. I have a fairly robust 1st Aid kit in the car - enough to treat knife and gunshots wounds as well as traumatic amputations - old habits etc.
I sunnier climes, the ticks are easier to spot - in Cyprus they're as big as your small finger nail and reminded me of the old thrupenny-bit coin. If they latch onto your head, you can actually hear them crunching their way in which is deeply unpleasant...I know...

Posted 2 June 2014
arkady001

Could be: I'm O-Pos and bugs love me, but when my wife is around, she gets bitten to buggery and beyond and I get nothing. Canada was the worst: mossies like Heinkel bombers which can suck a man dry - or to the point of anemia in 24 hours. We used gallons of DEET over there: on our clothes, skin everywhere... then discovered it melts any watch faces not made of real crystal as well as the plastic furniture on military weapons systems...lol
Ticks - UK ticks are pretty easy to get off if you don't mind small scars - I take a pragmatic approach and dig them out ASAP then douse with alcohol or iodine. I have a fairly robust 1st Aid kit in the car - enough to treat knife and gunshots wounds as well as traumatic amputations - old habits etc.
I sunnier climes, the ticks are easier to spot - in Cyprus they're as big as your small finger nail and reminded me of the old thrupenny-bit coin. If they latch onto your head, you can actually hear them crunching their way in which is deeply unpleasant...I know...



I remember years ago on a family holiday in Spain both my sisters and mum had mossie bites but myself and dad returned without any. It was like they bypassed me and dad and went straight for my mum and sisters. Your first aid kit sounds amazing, prepared for all emergencies. I'm glad I'm not in a sunnier climate, fingernail sized and crunching does indeed sound horrible!!

Posted 2 June 2014
Hugh
Photographer
Hugh
Most infections are caused by ticks in the nymphal stage, as they are very small and may feed for long periods of time undetected. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyme_disease http://www.lymediseaseaction.org.uk/about-ticks/
Posted 2 June 2014
Hugh
Photographer
Hugh
Basically, if you see this: or this: and you start feeling really shit, then it's time to see your Doctor and make certain they take it seriously. If you get a bite from a big tick and remove it straight away, there's not so much to worry about.
Posted 2 June 2014
Edited by Hugh 2 June 2014
AlisterAberdeen
Photographer
AlisterAberdeen
I am really glad that you saw this post Chrissie. This is something that we discussed on our last shoot. I had a shoot in Perthshire on Saturday, and as when we shot, I was concerned for the model. We delliberately didn't shoot in a place where she knew there was ticks. I asked her to make sure her partner throughly checked her for ticks after the shoot.

This morning, I found a tick on my back...........

Midges
They pose no health risk, but can be extremely unpleasant and uncomfortable. They could stop a shoot.

My mother's family live on the Inner Hebredies, and we often visit in July or August. I often shoot landscape, and early, on a still morning, I couldn't shoot without using a full midgie headnet - similar to a bee keepers head protection.

Ticks
They don't cause discomfort, but they can bring potentially serious health risks. They can carry bacterial infections - most commonly Lyme Disease, which if untreated, can create significant health problems.

Personally, I wouldn't shoot or walk in any areas that I knew had ticks.

Good information on the links below.

In summary:

1. An insect repellant may provide some protection against ticks.

2. After any outdoor activity, especially in a area used by wild animals (ticks are often on deer, sheep and other wild animals) you should check yourself throughly for ticks. Check your armpits, groin and all over your body.

3. If you do find a tick/s, don't burn it off, use vaseline or try and remove with tweasers. Remove asap (the longer they are on your body, the risk you have to be infected). Use a specifc tick remover (available in most outdoor shops for less than £5) and clean with antiseptic.

4. Keep the ticks.

5. If you get a red, bulleyes rash, or have flu like symptons, go to the doctor asap, and tell them you were bitten by ticks. Keeping the ticks may help in diagnosis.

6. If untreated, Lyme Disease can cause significant health problems.

Around 300 cases a year are diagnoised in Scotland and around 2 -3000 in England and Wales

Areas with high tick population include

Exmoor
the New Forest in Hampshire
the South Downs
parts of Wiltshire and Berkshire
Thetford Forest in Norfolk
the Lake District
the Yorkshire Moors
the Scottish Highlands

You should't be so scared that you don't want to leave the house.

But if you reguarly shoot in remote areas, you should be aware of how to reduce risk, Lyme disease symptoms and that you need to go to the Dr asap if you feel unwell after tick bites.

Some information below -

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/lyme-disease/pages/introduction.aspx

http://www.lymediseaseaction.org.uk/





Posted 2 June 2014
AlisterAberdeen
Photographer
AlisterAberdeen
Hi,

I posted here a month ago, after a location shoot in Perthshire. It was up to nude, and it made me think of the risks to the model of tick bites. The mostly live on wild animals and often carry bacterial infections. If the ticks bite, these bacteria can be passed on to humans.

A few days after the shoot it was me that found ticks - one on the back of my arm, one on my back. I got them out and didn't think it was a big deal.

Earlier this week, I noticed a red, circular rash and had been feeling extremely tired - often sleeping for 2 hours after work, then sleeping all night. Also had a stiff neck, and been very hot.

Went to the doctor who prescribed a 2 week course of strong antibiotics. My symptoms were not too bad, and this treatment should nip this in the bud. But if not diagnosed or treated, this can develop into something much more serious.

After a shoot,

1. Check your body for ticks.
2. Remove any ticks ASAP with a tick remover. Can buy from an outdoor shop for £5. The faster you remove them, the less lightly you are to be infected.
3. If you do develop a red circular rash after being bitten, go to your go, ASAP



http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Lyme-disease/Pages/Introduction.aspx

http://www.lymediseaseaction.org.uk



Posted 11 July 2014
brownnwhite
Photographer
brownnwhite
Well said.
Its also imprtant to use a tick remover as pulling the ticks off can leave parts of the mouth in the skin which causes and infection.
Tick removal tools are also sold at Vets.
Posted 11 July 2014
AlisterAberdeen
Photographer
AlisterAberdeen
Very good point.

Never use a naked flame, Vaseline or tweezers to remove them. Only a tick remover.

Posted 11 July 2014
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