Selling art..

Selling art..

24 posts
7 April 2013
skymouse
Photographer
skymouse
angelique110

I am exploring what customers want by seeing what sells. What seems to be popular (and what I enjoy doing) is post impressionism. So trying that out. I used to do realism but that market of art is just dying slowly and is moving more onto abstraction.


Excellent — by the sounds of it you've already taken some key initiatives. cheeky I hope it works out well; please keep us updated.

Posted 8 April 2013
DorsetHammer
Photographer
DorsetHammer
You're in a very competitive market at the moment, thousands of students who have trained and honed their skills are tying, like you, to eke out a living. Keep it up though you have a good style with the post impressionism and I would have thought there were enough shops in the Brighton area to at least take some of your work on s.o.r basis.

Posted 8 April 2013
pentax5AC
Photographer
pentax5AC
Hi A, As a fellow artist, you will appreciate that all art by definition remains a matter of aesthetics and taste. Unfortunately however, commercial success within the gallery system remains underpinned by an elitist, well educated, but commercially driven group of critics and dealers, who; although they have never applied a single brush to canvas in their lives, dictate what is "fashionable and commercially viable" The secret is, don't chase it, leave them to it and paint instead what you want to paint and what gives you the greatest pleasure. Remember nothing in art is new; the avant garde just like to shock and pretend that it is, and when the shock element has worn thin, most people really (even today) prefer to hang something on their walls to provide them with pleasure. I make a decent living out of selling pin-ups, a throw back to the 1950s and some people's understandable yearn for days gone and nostalgia. Someone,somewhere will want and like what you paint too. Plug it, display it, advertise and keep pushing it...but ABOVE ALL ENJOY IT!!
Posted 8 April 2013
stefanschiefer
Photographer
stefanschiefer
I really like your work, I love your bold use of colours!!

My advice, if i'm honest is that your actually selling your work at a very low price. Whether you're in it for the money or the love of what you do, I believe your price point is too low. You can't be making much profit selling them at the price you have set.

Just like when someone is looking for a photographer, when you see someone who charges £10 an hour vs a photographer who charges £95 an hour; you are more likely to push toward the one who charges £95 due to perceived value.

It's better to sell one piece for £100 than have to try and and sell 10 at £10. Plus at £100 each, they become more valuable rather than a disposable print.

By pricing your items higher, you automatically get rid of the time wasters and only the people who are truly interested will contact/take the time to look.

I hope this makes sense and helps in some way

Stefan

p.s. and if someone wants something, they will pay for it no matter what the price. A love that we feel for a piece of art is priceless! I recently paid £250 for a sewing sampler for my GF. To her it is an extremely valuable piece of work, whereas to others its worthless.

Posted 8 April 2013
Edited by stefanschiefer 8 April 2013
w4pictures
Photographer
w4pictures
I really like your work too. Particularly the cityscapes. I also think you are pricing too low. Maybe go for a much higher price for a limited edition run.

Try www.fineartamerica.com as another home for your work. As well as a great source of art, its an inspiration.

Posted 8 April 2013
Knockout
Photographer
Knockout
You just sold one. I would never have known about it unless you posted about it here. Just keep mentioning that you paint whenever you can - who knows what might happen.
Posted 8 April 2013
Hugh
Photographer
Hugh
Your stuff is good.

I'd suggest pushing your prices up, and making the sizes bigger.
More like £100 for a 16" x 20" print possibly - or just sell originals.

There are not that many real buyers of art, and they aren't going to be that price sensitive.
You can put off the real buyers by having prices too low.


[I only sold two prints last year, so my advice might not be worth much!]

Posted 9 April 2013
DKirk
Photographer
DKirk
Hugh
Your stuff is good. More like £100 for a 16" x 20" print possibly - or just sell originals. There are not that many real buyers of art, and they aren't going to be that price sensitive. You can put off the real buyers by having prices too low. [I only sold two prints last year, so my advice might not be worth much!]
Bang On - for one of mine PRINT ONLY 6"x6" £35-45 depending on the edition size (max of 150) And double ditto about the low price, there is a degree when the price is too low and people won't look at it or take you seriously, Hence why I'd shy away from selling limited editions on ebay.
Posted 9 April 2013
alexkidd
Photographer
alexkidd
selling art is mainly about the product and the consumer, make sure your product is good, printed well, framed well (and i do mean well, get rid of those range frames) and then figure out where to sell it, a greasy spoon cafe not so much, a nice hotel or decent gallery is a way better place ideally somewhere that's relevant to the art price it so it's worth something rather than £35 and it's got a larger chance of selling imho +2p
Posted 10 April 2013
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