advice for a wedding

8 posts
3 weeks ago
Moorlane
Photographer
Moorlane

Wedding photography is outside my experience ( well I did one once a long time ago). I have agreed to do a wedding for a close friend in January so lots of time to think about it. The ceremony will be in a community hall and I am looking to do the ceremony and the usual  shots of bride/groom , bridesmaids etc. I don't want to be using flash so the advice I am looking for is ISO/speed/aperture along with any general advice. Many thanks 

 

Posted 3 weeks ago
redbaron
Photographer
redbaron

First bit of advice is do not underexpose in low light situations. High iso then still underexposing is a recipe for muddy grainy images. Much better to go for a higher iso and over expose and pull back later because of the way digital sensors work. Not sure I would want to go without flash entirely though. Doing so opens you up to the vagaries of mixed lighting and lack of control on where it is. Just don’t use the flash on camera. Get it off to one side or at the very least invest in one of. The many flash adaptors available to give a slightly softer effect. 

Make sure you have a shoot list so you do not miss vital shots. I don’t care if they say they don’t want formal shots. Brides lie and will scream blue murder when that shot with an important relative they never mentioned is not there

Make sure you have it clearly in writing what you are expected to provide and what they are paying for if anything. Frankly friends and family shoots can be a nightmare. I see far more posts on Facebook groups from photographers, tearing out their hair over absurdly demanding friends they thought they were doing a favour for than any other shoot. Particularly if the mother in law or mother of the bride start getting their oar in. 

Have an assistant. It is going to be a long day unless you are just covering the actual ceremony and that bag gets heavy and a pain to keep a constant eye on

Finaly don’t do it. Far less stress to just lose the friend now. 😀

Posted 3 weeks ago
Edited by redbaron 3 weeks ago
riddell
Photographer
riddell


Posted 2 weeks ago
Edited by riddell 2 weeks ago
riddell
Photographer
riddell


Posted 2 weeks ago
Edited by riddell 2 weeks ago
riddell
Photographer
riddell

You need to know what you are doing and adapt.

 


Let go for a simple senerio. The couple ask for a photo outside and its nice and sunny, thats setting #1, then the bride spots a nice tree and wants a photo under that, so you need to change your setting as now you are in the shade. Then she says there is a great staircase inside, I want a shot of us there, so you are now onto your 3rd set of settings, then she asks to move up the staircase in front of a huge window, light streaming through and now its majorly backlit and you want a 4th set of settings, plus you'll seriously struggle in this senerio without a flash, just as you would have downstairs in the darker part of the staircase, without raising the ISO too high.

 


Thats just 10 minutes of shots. How will you cope running backwards as the bride walks into the room switching from outside in the sun, to an ultra dark corridor, through a room with huge windows on oneside only and then through to a the main room where there is now multiple people and you need to get them all in focus? All those chanegs of settings in a minute, whilst running backwards?

Posted 2 weeks ago
pompeytog
Photographer
pompeytog
riddell

You need to know what you are doing and adapt.

 


Let go for a simple senerio. The couple ask for a photo outside and its nice and sunny, thats setting #1, then the bride spots a nice tree and wants a photo under that, so you need to change your setting as now you are in the shade. Then she says there is a great staircase inside, I want a shot of us there, so you are now onto your 3rd set of settings, then she asks to move up the staircase in front of a huge window, light streaming through and now its majorly backlit and you want a 4th set of settings, plus you'll seriously struggle in this senerio without a flash, just as you would have downstairs in the darker part of the staircase, without raising the ISO too high.

 


Thats just 10 minutes of shots. How will you cope running backwards as the bride walks into the room switching from outside in the sun, to an ultra dark corridor, through a room with huge windows on oneside only and then through to a the main room where there is now multiple people and you need to get them all in focus? All those chanegs of settings in a minute, whilst running backwards?

Sounds like the staple for a wedding tog, done all this many times

Posted 2 weeks ago
cliffc
Photographer
cliffc

Do a few practice shots in both Venues about a fortnight before take a couple of freinds along to act as bride and groom.If  you dont feel confident then.I would not do it,It is a event that cannot be repeated and cost a lot of  money.You are going to need a reasonble fast shutter speed.because you may have camera shake and pople do move which on a slow shutter  wil cause blur movement, a high iso can cause noise depending on the camera.

Posted 2 weeks ago
riddell
Photographer
riddell

Unfortunately Cliffs advice is a mistake that many novice photographers make and can lead you into a false sense of security that will ulitmately only lead to failure.

The most important thing is to fully understand the basics of photography apature / shutter speeds / ISO / flash.

Nothing is the same from one day to the next, or even from one minute to the next.

In general I can go along to a shoot with a general idea or plan of settings that I want, but I'm constantly thrown and have to change things.

Example. I can dial in a bunch of settings, its perfect, but then the sun goes behind a cloud and now different settings are required. I can go into a room, quickly analyse the light, dial in the settings, take a test shot. Perfect. But then the lighting can change in the room, people or items that were not there a minute ago can block or reflect light. The sun can still emerge or go behind clouds, and as the day goes on the angle of the sun can make an absolutely enormous difference. And many rooms depenedant upon which side of the room I stand could be shooting in a very bright corner one side and a dark corner the otherside. A perfect plan I may have had of where to stand now isn't poossible for some unforseen circumstance. Maybe someone important I cannot move is now in the way.

You have to think on your feet and adjust everything all the time.

Even different people may need different settings as skin tones and clothes colour change, or different fabrics are refective or more absorbant of light.

I've had it absolutely hundreds of times where a setup I planned, a group of settings I set that a minute ago was perfect, now doesn't work and I have to change something. I've had senerios where I get it perfect, then in the space of 2 seconds I have people or objects placed in front of me, and the house lights are turned either on or off for effect. I need to move, swap lenses, dial in new settings. Fast. Its not repeatable. I miss that bit of the wedding / event. I've missed it.

You need the shutter speed you need, but yes reasonably fast is a very basic catch all, and you want to avoid raising the ISO as much as possible, even with the best cameras. Of course without a flash, that is even more of a problem. Also without a flash how do you deal with any kind of even moderately backlit senerio?

 

Posted 2 weeks ago
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