All day shoots

16 posts
15 Jan 2017
Rhadamanthus
Photographer
Rhadamanthus
Hi all

I'm currently planning an 8 hr shoot and was discussing this with a fellow photographer (not on here) when he asked if I had a shoot with this model before. When I replied no he said that he wouldn't consider such such a long shoot with someone he had not worked with before. Now that wasn't something that had occurred to me before possibly because I have never met a model that I wished I hadn't booked. I should mention the model in question was well established with plenty of references and that it was a studio shoot. It also occurred to me that a models may have similar reservations about an 8hr shoot with a photographer that she has not worked with before.

So models and photographers what do you feel about accepting/offering an 8 hour studio shoot from/ to someone with whom you have not worked before, assuming they are established with good references

I would be interested to hear your views.

Dave

Posted 15 Jan 2017
Edited by Rhadamanthus 15 Jan 2017
redbaron
Photographer
redbaron
Presumably you have sets worked out to fill the day and you are confident the models has the look you need so what is the problem? The only time I can see an issue is where the photographer perhaps lacks the experience to control the shoot and nail the sets they are after.

Most genuinely experienced models do have their pat routine of poses for the genre they prefer, which can be handy to fill odd moments you go blank or where the photographer has no posing experience or ideas. That can be an issue if they are not the poses you are after and you do not have the confidence to break the flow to get the poses you want.

If the model had reservations I assume they would not take the booking from you. Otherwise they are there to do a job of work.

Posted 15 Jan 2017
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Why would 8 hours, as opposed to any other time be of any different concern when it comes to a strange photographer? Surely if he's iffy, then any amount of time's going to be a problem (at least that's how I'm interpreting the OP's post).

If it's concerning breaks, I'd imagine a lot it depends on the style of photography shot. So for example, if it's shooting with a commercial glamour/adult photographer shooting sets for publication I'd imagine the pace would be fairly heavy (though hopefully reflected by the pay). I'd also expect art-photographers to fart around a lot more, giving the model more down time between shoots. Of course there's no hard/fast rule though.

As for me, I've shot lots of full-day shoots (though usually 6 hours) with models I've never met before and there's plenty of breaks in between setting lights up and moving around and it's always been fine. And also there's plenty of nibbles & drink on tap. Due to my fitness levels it's always me that gets exhausted rather than any model I've shot with.

Posted 15 Jan 2017
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
And... if the model's experienced there shouldn't be problems from her end.

It's worth noting that 8 hours indoors in a comfy environment is also very different to 8 hours outdoors when it's not great weather (be it too cold or hot).

Posted 15 Jan 2017
dhuntuk
Photographer
dhuntuk
I personally would not book a model for a full day event at a studio without having worked with them first. Well, unless they are called Joceline, I would not.

There are plenty of 'Professional' models that I have worked in a studio and promised myself that I would neither book them again nor recommend them to anyone who asked.

Despite having directly contacted some models and agreed the levels and style of the shoot, there have been many who have either changed their mind (They wait for you to setup before telling you) about levels being more implied or that they are on they period and that this somehow effects our agreement.



Posted 15 Jan 2017
pompeytog
Photographer
pompeytog
I normally book for about 4 hours due to cost etc. In almost every case I wished I could afford to shoot for longer.

Having said that, I don't normally get my camera out of the bag for the first 30 mins to an hour. I'm very relaxed about my shoots and like to chat over a cuppa and a fag before we get started. In that time I'm seeing the model's facial expressions, her personality and her mannerisms. I want to get to see the real her and be completely chilled before we start to shoot.

I do of course understand that you probably can't do that if you are shooting for a client, but being a total hobbyist I like to take my time.

Posted 15 Jan 2017
Bob
Photographer
Bob
Rhadamanthus

Hi all I'm currently planning an 8 hr shoot and was discussing this with a fellow photographer (not on here) when he asked if I had a shoot with this model before. When I replied no he said that he wouldn't consider such such a long shoot with someone he had not worked with before.

What the other guy would consider is really of little consequence as it is what you and the model are happy with that counts.

Personally, I would not book a model for an eight hour studio shoot as there is no way I could envision photographing for eight hours constrained by a single location (unless I was producing a day's worth of commercial strip / porn sets requiring just a change of sheets and props inbetween) but I know others who like a shoot to last for a day.

However I have shot many models, in short bursts, pretty much from dawn until dusk over three to seven days on overseas trips, which I am sure plenty other photographers would not contemplate. I had either previously worked with many of these models or at least met up over coffee beforehand to discuss details, but a few telephone chats with a couple of the highly experienced ones were sufficient to put our minds at rest that we were on the same wavelength. We all have different ways of working, so don't let anyone else unduly influence yours.

If the model you are planning to use is on the circuit and regularly shooting all day in a studio environment, and if you believe you have enough ideas and stamina to last the day, just go for it.

Bob








Posted 15 Jan 2017
Edited by Bob 15 Jan 2017
mph
Photographer
mph
RedChecker

Why would 8 hours, as opposed to any other time be of any different concern when it comes to a strange photographer?


Because if one of you thinks the other is a pain in the arse - it'll be a bloody long day! 
Posted 16 Jan 2017
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
mph

Because if one of you thinks the other is a pain in the arse - it'll be a bloody long day! 


Ah yes, I've heard from models that they'd wished certain shoots in the past were a lot shorter with some photographers surprise
Posted 16 Jan 2017
Moorlane
Photographer
Moorlane
Im trying to understand why 8 hours is so important

Posted 17 Jan 2017
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Moorlane

Im trying to understand why 8 hours is so important


From a photographer's point of view (obviously depending on location & potential variety of scenery change) it allows for a decent amount of changes & styles to be shot with several breaks.  Plus the fact that models often do whole-day deals, and when you're forking out for a location (and possibly a MUA too) it makes more sense to shoot the whole day to make the most of your financial investment (and likely a day off work to do the shoot).

When I've shot 8 hours in the past in interesting locations (such as manor houses or abandoned factories) it allows for  (say) four completely different setups in different rooms.  So say it takes half hour to set up the lights, half hour to dismantle & move them to the next set and 30-45 minutes shoot time, that still gives a 1 hour break in the middle and two shorter 15 minute breaks between shoots... it's actually quite a good way of working if your stamina's up to it.
Posted 18 Jan 2017
cgwebster
Photographer
cgwebster
Moorlane
Im trying to understand why 8 hours is so important
I read this as a shorthand way of saying "all day shoot" rather than 8 hours having some intrinsic special importance Also, if you look, most models specify 8 hours as a full day day shoot, I've never seen one advertise rates for a 10 hour day
Posted 18 Jan 2017
dhuntuk
Photographer
dhuntuk
cgwebster
I read this as a shorthand way of saying "all day shoot" rather than 8 hours having some intrinsic special importance Also, if you look, most models specify 8 hours as a full day day shoot, I've never seen one advertise rates for a 10 hour day
If you take out the 'unpaid' lunch hour, it is actually only 7 hours... I have endured a few 6 hours bookings in the past. These are split into 2x3 hours sessions with a 30 minutes break in between. Seemed better..?
Posted 19 Jan 2017
MG
Photographer
MG
I was about to say it is a bit silly to arrange an 8 hour shoot as you'll both get tired and you won't be productive.... But then I met a model last year, went and stayed at her house on the Saturday evening and shot all day Sunday, leaving around 9pm on the Sunday.... I'd never met her before, went with largely no plan at all and got the most amazing shots. Of course we weren't shooting the whole time. It was all on location and travelling time was a fair bit but

So the answer is if you are comfortable about how the day is going to be filled and you are both happy then shut up and shoot! haha

Posted 19 Jan 2017
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Despite being stupidly overweight and unfit, some of my best shots have been towards the end of exhausting, all-day shoots.... maybe it's the adrenalin kicking in as I force myself to continue through the pain in my muscles/joints & sheer exhuastion? (it's not unusual for me to be shaking like a leaf at the end of a shoot).

Posted 20 Jan 2017
To reply to this thread you must be a member. Click here to join