Canvas Recommendation!

Canvas Recommendation!

14 posts
26 March 2016
JohnEnger
Photographer
JohnEnger
Heya'll, I just wanted to share my recent experience with Canson Canvas HD 400g. I just got a pack to play with on my Epson R3000. The result came out fantastic! Since Canson offer profiles for download on their website, I did not have to experiment the least bit. It was all just plug and play. And with a result to be amazed by to boot. I'll be offering clients canvas prints from now on! Happy Easter! John
Posted 26 March 2016
redbaron
Photographer
redbaron
Upload image to professional printer. Await delivery. Hand to client. No risk no hassle no experimenting no size limits.I understand the personal satisfaction, much like I used to enjoy messing around in the darkroom at times but commercially it makes no sense

Posted 26 March 2016
diipii
Photographer
diipii
Isn't Canvas a photograph trying to be a painting ?

Posted 31 March 2016
riddell
Photographer
riddell

Have to agree with redbaron.

For commercial purposes, i.e. to sell to customers you shouldn't be printing yourself, it takes too much time, is a pain in the ass, and most importantly is not spectacularly great quality, after all anyone can print at home on their own inkjet.



Posted 31 March 2016
JohnEnger
Photographer
JohnEnger
I think it was pretty hassle free, quite fast. Like 5 minutes for A4 size. I have had several print-shops screw up colors for me. It was an experiment, initially, but if I can make the prints at the price of the ink and canvas, I see no reason to send the work away. It may not roll in the big bucks, but what the hell..
Posted 31 March 2016
riddell
Photographer
riddell
> I have had several print-shops screw up colors for me.

That's because you are not using one of the genuine professional shops.

There are literally thousands of cheap places out there on the internet that cater for the average person. The quality if comparing them to your own efforts from your R3000 will be similar.

For commercial sales, you should be going to one of the pro places. Massive difference in quality and no colour issues.

Posted 1 April 2016
redbaron
Photographer
redbaron
JohnEnger

I think it was pretty hassle free, quite fast. Like 5 minutes for A4 size. I have had several print-shops screw up colors for me. It was an experiment, initially, but if I can make the prints at the price of the ink and canvas, I see no reason to send the work away. It may not roll in the big bucks, but what the hell..

Five minutest to print. PLUS
  • An hour fitting it to quality stretcher bars, making sure it is evenly tensioned, the edges taped, the hanging fitments added
  • An hour carefully coating with archive quality varnish/laminate to protect the finish. (I include cleaning you equipment)
  • The costs of protective wrapping to keep the product safe on the journey home by your client

I assume of course the canvas is a heavy 405gsm museum grade canvas, which is pH Neutral and meets the archival standards set forth by the ‘Fine Art Trade Guild’. (Good for 100 years)

I send them away because I am a professional photographer. They in turn are professional printers and paying clients quite rightly expect a professional finished product. The result is I almost certainly make a lot more from each canvas I sell that you ever will, despite the extra cost.

As I have said. I can understand someone doing it for their own fun and experience. If you imagine that doing this is somehow saving money from a business perspective though then sorry but you really need to book yourself onto a business course.
Posted 1 April 2016
JohnEnger
Photographer
JohnEnger
Thank you all for the great advice. The original posting was a product recommendation. I ended up getting business recommendations. Nice going guys!
Posted 1 April 2016
AndyGStudios
Photographer
AndyGStudios
Have to agree with RedBaron here... we ran a printshop at my old studio, bubblewrap at £14 a go, pain in the ass HP printer, scores of binned prints that had line skip issues or banding, and if the client isn't happy - can yo up the saturation and do it again so it's "fit for purpose" (a legal statement you have to adhere to if you want to keep their money.) I go Pro now, someone else's issue. Take Photobox for example, I printed my first port book through them... they scuffed the cover on the first, glued together a couple of pages on the second, and had duplicate pages in the third. They got it right on the fourth attempt, kudos too em as well, it's mint, but they probably spent the profit of a single sale getting to the 4th one. So all the effort, and not much to show for it; great result mind... and I have 3 spares I can throw around while I keep one for best in it's wrapper. Our experience was similar, oh we did tees, mugs, the usual stuff. Maintenance on top of the gear to keep up with deadlines, building pine and mdf frames into the night, which all have to be drum tight or they sag... right ballache, best to just be a studio, and let the printer guys handle the printing. It's nice to own a poster size printer, novel even for a while, but ultimately - a waste, very hard to make your money back on them if you take everything into consideration per sale from canvas and ink wastage to buying parts, the electricity, your time @ X whatever per hour, broken frames, accidental water drops or print issues. Good grade print materials and good grade inks cost, remember they have to last and be anti-fade. Cheaper canvas companies kick these £15 to £30 canvases out, and while they look great initially - they are garbage long term. No better way to stop return business.
Posted 1 April 2016
Edited by AndyGStudios 1 April 2016
JohnEnger
Photographer
JohnEnger
It still wasn't a request for business advice. But thanks...
Posted 1 April 2016
AndyGStudios
Photographer
AndyGStudios
Things rarely stay on topic on forums, but I like to think we can still look out for each other from time to time.

Posted 2 April 2016
JohnEnger
Photographer
JohnEnger
If that's how you see thos, sure!
Posted 2 April 2016
AndyGStudios
Photographer
AndyGStudios
Fair enough... there's a pit over there, go fall in it lol.
Posted 2 April 2016
riddell
Photographer
riddell

Red Baron describes an excellent snippet of professional life here.

Its a fantastic business reality lesson that any up and coming photographer should heed.

1. If you shoot for a day, its never a day. Its often two or more and therefore you need to charge for 2 or more days money. Charging rates of low rates of £100.00 a day actually means £50.00 a day, which means £6.25 an hour.

Below minimum wage.

You need to charge for a good couple of hours work + editing time + packaging + time spent packaging and going to the post office etc + of course your markup on the actual canvas itself.


2. Customers can see the quality difference. My biggest mistake ever in my photography career and my one regret was investing lots of money and time in top quality printers, inks, papers, calibration, coatings.

It took up way, way too much of my time printing, had loads of rejects I had to throw away costing me money and worse customers complained, saying it looks like its been printed on a inkjet (well it had) Even with a spot on image, they still complained.

Since then I dropped the lot and send it too a proper pro lab, no complaints, instead its people amazed at the quality - satisfied customers.

Since then I've tried to save money by going to cheaper printers, the sort that advertise everywhere on the internet and don't exclusively cater for professionals. Very mixed results, lots of wasted time. Lots of rejects, complaints, even when I have passed the images across to clients, they of course look OK, but really lack the quality and wow factor of a pro printer.

Ultimately this did not help my reputation and has since been abandoned.




Posted 4 April 2016
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