spare bedroom to studio

21 posts
28 Feb 2015
JimM
Photographer
JimM
I was thinking of converting my spare room into a studio.Has anyone got any advice on what pitfalls I face and how to avoid them or any tips on how to make the most of the space I have?the room is 13'x9'

Posted 28 Feb 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Is this for macro work?

I can't imagine there's much you can constructively do in such a small space other than utilise bounce flash, and even then you'll be restricted to shooting fairly wide angles. Headshots may be possible using lots of black cloth to absorb stray light.

Posted 28 Feb 2015
HowardJ
Photographer
HowardJ
JimM
I was thinking of converting my spare room into a studio.Has anyone got any advice on what pitfalls I face and how to avoid them or any tips on how to make the most of the space I have?the room is 13'x9'
That's kinda small. I read somewhere that painting walls gray is a good idea. Maybe different colours on different walls. But you'll struggle with lights in such a small space.
Posted 28 Feb 2015
Keltica
Photographer
Keltica
The only way you are going to make that a studio space, is by knocking all the other rooms to make one reasonable big enough.

Garages and rooms (unless you live in a mansion) just do not make a studio space.



Posted 28 Feb 2015
frankpht
Photographer
frankpht
Not ideal but it is do able. I use my livingroom which is probably about the same size. A couple of studio flashes and a backdrop and you make do with what you've got. The only pitfall is the size but you know that so get on with it and make it happen. Can't give you anymore advice as I or we don't know anything else about your equipment.

Posted 28 Feb 2015
Catuaba
Photographer
Catuaba
http://www.gardenbuildingsdirect.co.uk/wooden-garden-workshops
Posted 28 Feb 2015
basil
Photographer
basil
Paint the walls white; chuck in a couple of speedlights and cheap umbrellas from ebay and you're good to go. Once you get bored of this you can add some gels and make your own flags and snoots.

I recommend foam sheets for the flags http://www.hobbycraft.co.uk/hobbies/craft-bases-and-essentials/felt-and-foam-sheets

Do a shoot; see what you'd like to improve on and steadily acquire pieces as you need them.

Posted 4 March 2015
Plymjack
Photographer
Plymjack
basil

Paint the walls white; chuck in a couple of speedlights and cheap umbrellas from ebay and you're good to go. Once you get bored of this you can add some gels and make your own flags and snoots. I recommend foam sheets for the flags http://www.hobbycraft.co.uk/hobbies/craft-bases-and-essentials/felt-and-foam-sheets Do a shoot; see what you'd like to improve on and steadily acquire pieces as you need them.



+1
A more positive resposne......  true its not idea but its not impossible, just learn to work to the rooms limits.  Good Luck
Posted 4 March 2015
marlhamphoto
Photographer
marlhamphoto
basil

Paint the walls white...

I certainly wouldn't do that.

The smaller a studio space is the more challenging it becomes to control light scatter and painting the walls white will make that task virtually impossible. Personally I'd go for blackboard paint on 3 of the 4 walls and leave one side wall white. But have enough black polyboards so that you can block some or all of that white wall depending on how much contrast you need for the particular shot you're after. Otherwise having white walls will just result in flat, boring photos no matter how hard you try for something more interesting.

Good luck
Posted 4 March 2015
Edited by marlhamphoto 4 March 2015
redbaron
Photographer
redbaron
I would not even bother about studio lighting. There is one available for free. Its called the sun and does not take up any space inside the room

Posted 4 March 2015
YellowSnapper
Photographer
YellowSnappe..
Ive done this... my rooms is simialr, if not smaller.
Deffo not ideal, but it is possible, dont be disheartened, the lighting etc is diffcult, but keep practising... and if you have the money, invest in some good lighting which spreads quickly over wide areas.

Posted 4 March 2015
basil
Photographer
basil
marlhamphoto

I certainly wouldn't do that.

The smaller a studio space is the more challenging it becomes to control light scatter and painting the walls white will make that task virtually impossible. Personally I'd go for blackboard paint on 3 of the 4 walls and leave one side wall white. But have enough black polyboards so that you can block some or all of that white wall depending on how much contrast you need for the particular shot you're after. Otherwise having white walls will just result in flat, boring photos no matter how hard you try for something more interesting.

Good luck


Sometimes you have to compromise. I went for the white walls. I use the room as a study when I'm not shooting and I couldn't live with black walls

Flat and boring are a matter of personal taste. It was a good enough arrangement for when I started. I'm now looking at getting a backdrop or two but that is because I have a couple of shoots in planning where a white background just wouldn't look right.
Posted 4 March 2015
MG
Photographer
MG
basil
Sometimes you have to compromise. I went for the white walls. I use the room as a study when I'm not shooting and I couldn't live with black walls Flat and boring are a matter of personal taste. It was a good enough arrangement for when I started. I'm now looking at getting a backdrop or two but that is because I have a couple of shoots in planning where a white background just wouldn't look right.
If you are using studio flash in a small to medium sized bedroom and you have white or light walls you will not be able to control light from the flashes. Ideal if you want completely flat lighting like seen on the old venture style lifestyle images of kids jumping up and down but nobody will ever learn lighting techniques this way. I am talking from personal experience of some years ago. That as usual is just my opinion and i am sure the next person will probably offr a different take.... Not trying to put anyone off the idea, just put up dark cloths around the room when shooting with studio lights that is all....
Posted 4 March 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
At best (ie. longest focal length possible) you'll be looking at ~50mm focal length for full-length shots using the entire length of the room with photographer and model pressed against opposing walls. If shooting across the room width you're then looking at ~35mm which will likely start capturing room corners etc. into the frame.

Posted 5 March 2015
mph
Photographer
mph
marlhamphoto

I certainly wouldn't do that.

The smaller a studio space is the more challenging it becomes to control light scatter and painting the walls white will make that task virtually impossible. Personally I'd go for blackboard paint on 3 of the 4 walls and leave one side wall white. But have enough black polyboards so that you can block some or all of that white wall depending on how much contrast you need for the particular shot you're after. Otherwise having white walls will just result in flat, boring photos no matter how hard you try for something more interesting.

Good luck


+1
Posted 5 March 2015
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