Working from home....skivers or flexible?

Working from home....skivers or flexible?

17 posts
20 Feb 2015
Chandos
Photographer
Chandos
Seems to be only afforded to the ones at senior roles usually in public sector. When they do work from home you either won't or rarely hear from them in work Whats more their holidays are protected while remaining to be paid staying at home (or are they at home, no one can check). They are not usually missed because they don't do real work that has a daily impact. Never cease to amaze how the workplace can afford to allow these better paid people to not show up at work on full pay without contributing anything meaningful to their employment, is it really worth wasting money keeping them on?
Posted 20 Feb 2015
Edited by Chandos 20 Feb 2015
HowardJ
Photographer
HowardJ
I sometimes work from home and connect to the office over a VPN. It works fine. I can even use our voice over IP telephony solution to save me using my blackberry for telephone conference calls. With the technology available today I can work as well at home as I can in the office and I get less interruptions working at home.

Posted 20 Feb 2015
Edited by HowardJ 20 Feb 2015
Chandos
Photographer
Chandos

I'm sure there are certain employments were working from home are fair and practical for better work life balance but it cannot explain away why for some when working from home you hardly ever hear from them. To me that is suspiciously close to skiving. Their absent aren't usually missed either so impact is minimal which begs the question is it worth paying such high salary to keep them? I suppose this happens more in public sector.

Posted 21 Feb 2015
Edited by Chandos 21 Feb 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence That said, if you haven't heard of it, you need to read about 'The Dilbert Priniciple' as this could arguably apply here. And thinking about it, do management actually do work when at work anyway? (my bosses are often at long lunches, looking at holidays, planning their offshore accounts etc.). I've worked from home on occasion, and may do more often as we're going to a leased line in work after suffering for the last few years with slow, unreliable ADSL. For my job you cannot skive as the the data has timestamps on and even so, it would be obvious if you hadn't pulled your weight.
Posted 21 Feb 2015
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictures
I work from home often, arguably it means I do more without the distractions and waffle that goes on in many work settings. Its not always as enjoyable as being amongst colleagues and the general social element of a workplace, and although flexible to an extent, often turns out that I work in the evening, early mornings and over weekends. I think I tend to be more conscientious working alone at home. That said, the op obviously has a bug up his BIM about something ( though only a point he's alluded to rather than describe) so I guess this response is a waste of time anyway.

Posted 21 Feb 2015
Chandos
Photographer
Chandos
Richard Branson even suggested employees are better at the their work if they don't have to show up for 9-5. Not sure if that is the media misinterpret or a tongue in cheek statement from the Virgin boss. Those in the creative industry also don't have a fixed 9-5 and work whenever necessary. Problems is that some public sector employees due to their position without check and balance can excuse themselves from the workplace at a moment notice and remain to be paid. Maybe for sake of transparency the office should check were the spouse or children of the employee concerned were during the time when he/she was staying at home to work.

Profilepicture suggest he works harder and better if he works from home, he probably do but without knowing what work he does his response is pointless really. I would imagine his job is office based and don't need him to be personally dealing with people face to face?
I started in industries were the managers are always in bright and early and the last to leave in the evening, their present is a necessity and had to set an example. The only people who works from home or show up whenever are the person who pays your salary which is the chairman and his close relatives. My post refer to people in well paid senior position usually in a public sector (not company owners but employees and public servants) this usually means managing others so their present at work is a real necessity that is if they are really fulfilling their role, however their absent from work are not missed by his/her colleagues and everything still running as it should, which begs the question is it really worth keeping them on?

Posted 22 Feb 2015
Edited by Chandos 22 Feb 2015
anthonyh
Photographer
anthonyh
Chandos

Seems to be only afforded to the ones at senior roles usually in public sector. When they do work from home you either won't or rarely hear from them in work Whats more their holidays are protected while remaining to be paid staying at home (or are they at home, no one can check). They are not usually missed because they don't do real work that has a daily impact. Never cease to amaze how the workplace can afford to allow these better paid people to not show up at work on full pay without contributing anything meaningful to their employment, is it really worth wasting money keeping them on?


I wonder if you know what you are talking about!! I worked from home and on occasions and know others that do. Don't you think it would have been knocked on the head by management if we had stopped doing our jobs?

In my case, my working hours gradually extended as people began to realize I was on the end of a phone or computer most of the day, didn't waste a couple of hours commuting each day, and didn't shut down for lunch. On the plus side, if I needed a break for a couple of hours I could take it then  rather than continue despite not focussing on the work properly...a major problem with employee efficiency apparantly....not being able to have breaks when needed rather than when the clock allows them.

I didn't have a senior role in the public sector.....and thinking about the other people I know who could work from home...none of them did either.
Posted 23 Feb 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
anthonyh

I wonder if you know what you are talking about!!


Like I said earlier, I think it's a case of jealousy and possibly with a bit of socialism mentality that's brought this on
Posted 23 Feb 2015
mph
Photographer
mph
Chandos

I would imagine his job is office based and don't need him to be personally dealing with people face to face?


Doh!  How likely is it than anybody in a conventional job necessitating dealing with people face to face would work from home?   
Posted 23 Feb 2015
DJ200
Photographer
DJ200
 Anthonhy ->cheeky
Posted 23 Feb 2015
Edited by DJ200 23 Feb 2015
Bob
Photographer
Bob
C'mon. Cut the poor guy a bit of slack. Don't you realise Chandos is stuck in the land of the Diddymen and jam butty mines, where they use the 1st generation keyboard.


Up there, the world looks very different from their perspective.

Bob
Posted 23 Feb 2015
mph
Photographer
mph
Bob

C'mon. Cut the poor guy a bit of slack. Don't you realise Chandos is stuck in the land of the Diddymen and jam butty mines, where they use the 1st generation keyboard.


Up there, the world looks very different from their perspective.

Bob


Oy!  I came from there!  smiley
Posted 23 Feb 2015
There are some people in life who are skivers, I've seen it in offices myself - People nipping to the "loo" for 25 minutes 3x a day.
Those people would do that shit wether they are in an office or not, they are just lazy people and unfortunately there isn't much an employer can do in that situation. You can't really tell people when they can or can't go to the "toilet".

On the other hand I've seen my husband working from home a couple of times and I'm amazed at how much he gets done. He doesn't need to commute, he doesn't have to get up to make the office coffee (I make him his coffee when he is here) and he doesn't need an hour for lunch because I will make his lunch for him. Then again he is probably the least "slacking" type person I know. 0 sick days in 7 years and even if he is granted time off for bereavement he will still nip into the office to do some work.



Posted 23 Feb 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Chrissie_Red

Those people would do that shit wether they are in an office or not


It's all down to the individual and their self discipline

/THREAD cheeky
Posted 23 Feb 2015
click_gotcha
Photographer
click_gotcha
I try to shirk from home at least twice a week.
Posted 26 Feb 2015
To reply to this thread you must be a member. Click here to join