How often do you clean your lens / camera ?

How often do you clean your lens / camera ?

26 posts
2 Feb 2015
SandyCamel
Photographer
SandyCamel

I would apporeciate advice re: lens / camera cleaning.


For example, do you ever do it ?

If so, how do you do it - which products etc.

Do you clean both ends of the lens ?

Is it really neccessary to remove the lens and clean inside the camera with a 'blower thingy ?' - for example if you always use the same lens and never remove it ?


I hope that this makes sense and thanks again for any advice you can give.



Posted 2 Feb 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
I clean the lenses and/or camera when they need it (ie. if there's visible dust on the sensor or lens).

And no matter how careful you are, and even if you put a brand new lens on a brand new camera (I've done it), the aggressive nature of the shutter mechanism and effects of lens breathing will inevitably introduce specks of dust/shutter lubricant onto the sensor or on the back of the lens.

It's nerve-wracking but sensor cleaning is IMO part/parcel of owning a dSLR and always work from the least invasive method first (ie blower) before working upwards to more invasive techniques (ie. Arctic Butterfly brush then if that fails... wet-cleaning with something like PecPads).
Posted 2 Feb 2015
Edited by RedChecker 2 Feb 2015
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictures
When its dirty, and before any significant shoot. Isn't this a silly question? When do you clean anything else?

Posted 2 Feb 2015
HowardJ
Photographer
HowardJ
I clean both ends of my lenses the night before a shoot.

I wet clean the senor using the appropriate sized cleaning pad with solution when I see dust appearing that I can't identify as being on the lens.

Posted 2 Feb 2015
riddell
Photographer
riddell

> For example, do you ever do it ?
Constantly, as its needed, which is often. Can be a dozen times or more in a day.

> If so, how do you do it - which products etc.
Cotton cloth and isoproponyl.

> Do you clean both ends of the lens ?
Yes

> Is it really neccessary to remove the lens and clean inside the camera with a 'blower thingy ?' - for example if you always use the same lens and never remove it ?
Yes.







Posted 2 Feb 2015
HowardJ
Photographer
HowardJ
I use Sensor Swabs from photo solutions and the correct cleaning fluid for the camera so as not to take off any protection coating on the sensor.

Posted 2 Feb 2015
SandyCamel
Photographer
SandyCamel

Brilliant !


Thank you for your advice every-one - really very much appreciated !


I will be off to buy the required cleaning products ready for the next shoot !


I haven't cleaned the camera since purchase so a few years of cleaning to do !

Posted 2 Feb 2015
HowardJ
Photographer
HowardJ
SandyCamel
Brilliant ! Thank you for your advice every-one - really very much appreciated ! I will be off to buy the required cleaning products ready for the next shoot ! I haven't cleaned the camera since purchase so a few years of cleaning to do !
Check photo solutions website to find out which solution you should use for your sensor. Some will eat the protective coating off, which is never a good way to start the day. You also need to buy the correct size for the size of the sensor you have otherwise it'll either not fit or slide all over the sensor. Again the photo solutions site will tell you what you need.
Posted 2 Feb 2015
Edited by HowardJ 2 Feb 2015
SandyCamel
Photographer
SandyCamel
HowardJ

Check photo solutions website to find out which solution you should use for your sensor. Some will eat the protective coating off, which is never a good way to start the day. You also need to buy the correct size for the size of the sensor you have otherwise it'll either not fit or slide all over the sensor. Again the photo solutions site will tell you what you need.




Okay, thanks Howard. 
Posted 2 Feb 2015
EllessePhotography
Photographer
EllessePhotography
For cleaning the sensor, I would only do it when it's needed (when it takes more than a couple of clicks to sort in PP). I only use a wet solution if there appears to be an oily residue on the sensor. The dust aid is very good for removing dust spots (uses a tacky pad). Personally, I would never use a blower on the sensor as it just moves the dust rather than getting rid of.

As for cleaning lens's, every time before I use it. I use the Ahhh method first (breathing on it) along with a microfiber cloth. If heavier cleaning is required, a wee drop of isopropyl alcohol does the trick.
Posted 2 Feb 2015
Edited by EllessePhotography 2 Feb 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
If you shoot wide-open with fast lenses then it's unlikely you'll notice specks of dust on the lens or sensor.  It's only when you stop down that the problems become apparent.  And if you shoot 'natural' backgrounds rather than plain walls/paper rolls in a studio it's unlikely you'll notice anything.

It's worth looking at this article, especially the bit where his has five large white blobs on the lens.
Posted 2 Feb 2015
Edited by RedChecker 2 Feb 2015
SandyCamel
Photographer
SandyCamel
RedChecker
If you shoot wide-open with fast lenses then it's unlikely you'll notice specks of dust on the lens or sensor.  It's only when you stop down that the problems become apparent.  And if you shoot 'natural' backgrounds rather than plain walls/paper rolls in a studio it's unlikely you'll notice anything. It's worth looking at this article, especially the bit where his has five large white blobs on the lens.
Oh, that was very interesting. I see what you mean, with your advice and the main message I got from the article: 'Based on my un-scientific testing, I'd say there isn't any noticeable reduction in image quality as a result of normal dirt, smudges and small scratches on the front element.' Perhaps I will just give the external part of the lens a clean and leave it for another 2 to 3 years lol !
Posted 2 Feb 2015
HowardJ
Photographer
HowardJ
Based on my personal experience I'd say regular cleaning is definitely worth doing as you will notice dust specks on the images. Obviously you can remove them but it takes time.

Posted 2 Feb 2015
PaulManuell
Photographer
PaulManuell
SandyCamel
'Based on my un-scientific testing, I'd say there isn't any noticeable reduction in image quality as a result of normal dirt, smudges and small scratches on the front element.'
I think this mostly holds true, but it might be a different story if you ever do any location shooting into the light, ie., towards the sun.
Posted 3 Feb 2015
PaulManuell
Photographer
PaulManuell
profilepictures
When its dirty, and before any significant shoot. Isn't this a silly question? When do you clean anything else?
Wtf is it with you (and a couple others) that you always have to ridicule or take the p1ss and adopt a superior attitude? Ok, so you think the OP's question was silly. So what? Why come on here to say so? What do you gain from it, apart from topping up your already high smugness levels? The OP clearly didn't think it was a silly question, and neither has any other poster on here apart from you. Over to you for the obligatory smug putdown
Posted 3 Feb 2015
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