Unsecured wireless connection

Unsecured wireless connection

5 posts
19 Dec 2014
Chandos
Photographer
Chandos
Hi All,
I don't usually bother about my wireless connection but today my Sky WiFi broadband has gone down. Anyway I looked up the list of heads that are about in my neighbourhood and they are mostly secured apart from "BTWiFi with FON" and Linksys. I can actually connect to Linksys and use it to connect to the internet as normal. I even switched off my Sky Netgear and still connected to this Linksys. Is this Linksys belong to someone else and because it is unsecured anyone within the area can use it?
I checked on the DNS and the search domain cable.virginmedia.net. I'm not with Virgin cable.

Posted 19 Dec 2014
Edited by Chandos 19 Dec 2014
redbaron
Photographer
redbaron
Yes it will belong to someone else, presumably someone who set up their wi-fi but lacked the technical nouse to secure it properly. While you can of course connect to it you could also potentially be open to charges of theft.

Of course if they do have a little knowledge they will also be able to see you are connected to it!

BTwifi with fon can be connected to for free if you have a BT internet account. It is secured by a password you have to enter before you can connect to the web. BT claim this service is being provided by customers who have opted to share a portion of their bandwidth. ******** of course. They set up their hubs to do this by default, hoping most users will either not realise they are doing this or not know how to turn it off.

Posted 19 Dec 2014
Chandos
Photographer
Chandos
Thanks red baron. I notice this Linksys unsecured long ago of course didn't bother with it as I have my own broadband. The BT one automatically ask for payment options.

Posted 19 Dec 2014
Andy_B
Photographer
Andy_B
BT FON is a reasonable model. Not something I'd use personally, but it's not as bad as redbaron implies.

Yes, it's set up by default as a separate network in addition to your regular secured wifi. People connecting to FON cannot see across into your home wifi. FON is throttled, and the householder receives priority on their internet bandwidth. If someone used FON for something illicit, I think the 'deniability' defence would be very strong.

The aim of FON is to create a network of open hotspots, and enable those that allow BT to create FON on their router to benefit from other FON hotspots. You can opt out, but then you loose free access to other's networks.

Posted 20 Dec 2014
paule
Photographer
paule
I allow other people to use part of my BT broadband as a hot-sport via BT Fon.. it's freely accessible to other BT users and works very well... especially for mobile use..

I'd not use FON or any free Wi-Fi if I was browsing a site that required any passwords' though for general surfing no problem at all..

Posted 22 Dec 2014
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