Camera LCD does not represent what I am shooting

Camera LCD does not represent what I am shooting

16 posts
2 Nov 2014
dhuntuk
Photographer
dhuntuk
Basically, the topic says it all. On my 300D, 10D and 40D cameras I was able to use the LCD screen to ensure I had the lighting set-up correctly. Unfortunately, the LCD on the back of my used 5D is way off. Yes, I have tried to adjust the brightness. But it does not help. Now, I have two choices. 1. Calibrate the lighting using my old 300D (The others do not work) and my white card as normal. Then when I am happy, do a white balance on my 5D and carry on as normal. Or, 2. Calibrate a Windows tablet (I am thinking of getting a Surface) and shoot to it whilst tethered whilst setting-up the lighting. The problem I have is that firstly, I have never used a camera whilst tethered and secondly, which software, if any do I require on a Windows machine? I assumed I can used Windows photo Viewer to check out the images. And, does the first option make sense? I may try it on next shoot in a few weeks time. Thank you, for reading.
Posted 2 Nov 2014
Edited by dhuntuk 2 Nov 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
The image on the screen should only be used as a rough guide and primarily to check focus/composition. The histogram should be what you're constantly looking at for checking exposure. The problem is, every camera has a different LCD which displays colour & brightness differently and the images shown are the processed JPGs (even when shooting RAW as they're embedded) and so the colours aren't always true anyway.

Unless you've got wireless, I find tethering with a cable can be a pain as the cables can get caught and wiggle loose which then means you have to reboot the capture software again, or worse still you can snag them and risk damaging something.

Posted 2 Nov 2014
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictures
I can't remember now if the 5d had picture styles? If so you can try changing those to affect the JPEG displayed in camera. I'm pretty sure you can fool with the colours individually too but having never relied on JPEG can't recall exactly. As red says, it's a guide really, shoot raw and do as you will after the event is my approach, other than in black and white where the JPEG acts as a good light and time guide whilst working.

As for tethering, I don't know a thing as it seems a waste of time unless trying to look super slick or something? A mirror behind camera can help a model get into the groove pose wise, but I prefer just to direct really.

Posted 2 Nov 2014
OldMaster
Photographer
OldMaster
You have one choice....use the histogram and white balance particularly if you are not shooting raw. ..

Posted 2 Nov 2014
w4pictures
Photographer
w4pictures
I would simplify your plans.

As above, check the histogram. However, I understand the annoyance of having the back of the camera showing something very far removed from the image that finally hits your computer, especially when shooting from the hip, as it were.

Take a snap with a good range of tones, put it up on your computer screen once you are sure that it shows reasonable verisimilitude, pop the card back into the camera and adjust the camera screen brightness until it looks broadly similar.

This will give you a quick and rough idea of exposure on the fly, albeit ignoring colour and being less accurate than the histogram. But in a studio, you can dial in the colour temperature appropriate for your lights so you should never need to seek a qualitative representation of colour on the camera screen.

Posted 2 Nov 2014
MG
Photographer
MG
The later Canons have exposure simulation on them. I don;t think the 40D had it but the 5D II and III has it and so does the 60, 70 and probably most of them over the last two or three years. Its in the menu section. Make sure it is switched on...

Posted 2 Nov 2014
mph
Photographer
mph
MG

The later Canons have exposure simulation on them. I don;t think the 40D had it but the 5D II and III has it and so does the 60, 70 and probably most of them over the last two or three years. Its in the menu section. Make sure it is switched on...


but not if it is a Mk1

Posted 2 Nov 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
MG

The later Canons have exposure simulation on them. I don;t think the 40D had it but the 5D II and III has it and so does the 60, 70 and probably most of them over the last two or three years. Its in the menu section. Make sure it is switched on...


Isn't that a LiveView feature?  (it has no bearing on taking normal photos)

It still doesn't account for the fact that every single LCD screen out there will have a different brightness, colour tone and reflectivity and they'll all appear different when compared side-by-side.
Posted 2 Nov 2014
Edited by RedChecker 2 Nov 2014
LaurenceJPower
Photographer
LaurenceJPower
One possibility that I don't see as having been considered - a fault in the body, it might be worth getting the body to a repair centre to be checked over.

Posted 3 Nov 2014
MG
Photographer
MG
RedChecker

Isn't that a LiveView feature?  (it has no bearing on taking normal photos)

It still doesn't account for the fact that every single LCD screen out there will have a different brightness, colour tone and reflectivity and they'll all appear different when compared side-by-side.


You're quite right it is, Sorry I assumed that the op meant in liveview. Lots of people said it before but theyre only a guide. When I'm doing some of my workshops I have half a dozen people taking identical images and three or four of them get different results on their screens...
Posted 4 Nov 2014
JeromeRazoir
Photographer
JeromeRazoir
Bin it. Buy a Nikon.

Posted 10 Nov 2014
Mr_Catz
Photographer
Mr_Catz
RedChecker

Isn't that a LiveView feature?  (it has no bearing on taking normal photos)

It still doesn't account for the fact that every single LCD screen out there will have a different brightness, colour tone and reflectivity and they'll all appear different when compared side-by-side.



I checked my history gram nowadays. I have discovering that my LCD panel on the back of my camera tends to shows a nice bright images, when they are usually underexposed. To get round this I am starting to shoot slightly brighter (which looks overexposed) in order to get the correct exposure.
 
To get an accurate view of the scene I tend to use the viewfinder as on my camera it is renowned for being accurate and true.

As the gentleman says, do not rely on your LCD!
Posted 25 April 2015
HowardJ
Photographer
HowardJ
Try factory resetting it and go from there.

Posted 25 April 2015
redbaron
Photographer
redbaron
Seeing as the OP was at the start of November 2014 I'm sure this was resolved long before someone decided to do some gravedigging
Posted 25 April 2015
dhuntuk
Photographer
dhuntuk
Yes, I have worked out that I have to underexpose by exactly one half of a stop to reliably get the images I need after performing a white/grey balance. ie. Measure for f5.6 5/10 and shoot at f8.

I cannot make sense of the histogram as it is all gobbledegook to me!



Posted 28 April 2015
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