LED Lighting

12 posts
27 Sep 2014
paulbatterbury
Photographer
paulbatterbu..
Hey people LED lighting is improving all the time, and I expect some of you use it for video work and I even seen some low cost ring flashes that can produce some great portfolio head shots.

With the current incentive of moving over to more energy saving lighting for 2015, LED blubs really are giving more traditional energy saving blubs a run for their money, in fact they are bright as soon as you turn on, and you don’t have to wait for them to warm up, I don’t think they is any competition, but I wanted to check to find out what other people have discovered about LED lighting. Both in terms of domestic and in the use of their work.

I was looking as replacing my modelling light on my monoblock’s with LED blubs, I found some that I thought would do the job, but! (here be the lesson) they pulsed, due to the power supply come via the monoblock’s own circuit, as when I plug them in direct, they are perfect, also not as bright as I had hoped, but these blubs where dimmable . I also found that 12 volt blubs can flicker, when running of a 12 volt transformer, so possibly best to keep everything 250 volt if you can.

On average LED blubs pump out the same amount of light as a more traditional blub 4 time is power consumption so and LED blub of 4.5 watts pumps out the same if not more light than a 50 watt halogen, which I had in the studio (at first) then dropped down to 20 watts and then LED’s which make all the different in terms of light and the electricity bill, and the studio is bright enough for video work, with little need of extra lighting.

What have other people discovered with LED lighting?
Posted 27 Sep 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Not used them but read up about CRI (colour rendering index). Both LEDs and flourescent lighting sources can suffer from 'gaps' in the light spectrum and as a result can produce harsher looking results, and while they may work fine for quick/low end video setups, for high-end work you may feel them lacking in overall lighting quality (although KinoFlo flourescents are highly regarded). For this reason I get the impression that tungsten, HMI and flash are preferred when the budget allows as they give a full-spectrum light.

Posted 27 Sep 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
I read once that certain light colours bounce off the skin differently as well. The suggestion was that higher-temperature light (ie. more blue, like flash) bounced off the skin surface, wheras warmer temperature (like tungsten light) bounced of the layer of flesh under the skin and produces a softer look. May be worth experimenting with.

Posted 27 Sep 2014
Andy_B
Photographer
Andy_B
This seems to be the cutting edge:

http://vimeo.com/99790408

Much better colour acccuracy by taking the phosphors out of the LED (LEDs don't naturally produce white light) and instead using single-frequency blue LEDs as a light source with a remote-phosphot panel. Brighter lighting too.
Posted 27 Sep 2014
w4pictures
Photographer
w4pictures
Arri do a range of LED lamps. Pricey, though. Expect to pay £800 to £2500 per lamp.

There's also a multitude of panel lamps, mostly from China, of differing qualities, some dimmable and some with selectable colour temp but the light output is still fairly low compared with flash.

Posted 27 Sep 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
I think the fact that Arri (along with many other companies) are still on their first generation of LED lamps would indicate the technology isn't mature. Another problem with LEDs is that they're fairly directional (ie. light doesn't spread well), and I've heard from a friend who uses a 'Blad that LED panels can produce multiple shadows (ie. a shadow from each LED) so you'd want to diffuse them which would also drop their output.

If looking at glamour/adult filming, many companies seem to use KinoFlos. One of the benefits of KinoFlos is that they come with ballasts that run them at a flicker-free 100kHz. Having seen them in action, they also produce a nice diffused light. If I could afford/justify them I'd go with them rather than LEDs.

Posted 28 Sep 2014
paulbatterbury
Photographer
paulbatterbu..
Andy_B

This seems to be the cutting edge:

http://vimeo.com/99790408

Much better colour acccuracy by taking the phosphors out of the LED (LEDs don't naturally produce white light) and instead using single-frequency blue LEDs as a light source with a remote-phosphot panel. Brighter lighting too.


This was a very nice post, and it made complete sense to me also, simple information that made sense and explain why also.  They use Phosphot in CRT on the old style TV, so it really clever thinking to step back and use an old technolgy to solove an issue with a new technolgy, old school thinking clearly pays of at times.

We have been very impressed with some of the domesic lighting we seen over here in France, I think Euro maybe ahead of the UK in terms of LED lighting in general as some of the issues Red has posted up, are not over here, we have excelet light in the studio, form are domesic LED lighting.

I agree that in some cases an extra fill in maybe need at time with LED light when it come to video and you have cold and unflattering tone, however with tungsten you get tones of red and it can look too warm at time, simple colour correction does help and some HD video camera have colour correction to counteract cold or warm light tones.

It is going to be intresting to see what happens in terms of photographic contasnt lighting and video lighting in the near future.




Posted 28 Sep 2014
Rawandthecooked
Photographer
Rawandthecoo..
I had a go with a lupolux led light! Seemed good to me, ran cool, punchy, reasonable power! Of course, I didn't read any techno babble, so what do I know?

Posted 28 Sep 2014
paulbatterbury
Photographer
paulbatterbu..
Rawandthecooked

I had a go with a lupolux led light! Seemed good to me, ran cool, punchy, reasonable power! Of course, I didn't read any techno babble, so what do I know?


Well there are a few models, but for 600watts of light, it draws 50watts of power, which is very nice, that now means you could go on night location shoots with something like a Hemsel Visit which could happyily power two of those together. for about 30 mins on one battery.
Posted 2 Dec 2014
johntisbury
Photographer
johntisbury
I've shot video with LED lights for about 12 months, replacing a set of tungsten ARRI heads. I find them streets ahead of the tungsten equivalents. Stable colour, no heat generation, low running costs and can be moved whilst turned on. Like most things you get what you pay for, the cheaper LEDs often have a colour bias whereas the more expensive ones will achieve a stable 5600k. I three have iKAN models, http://ikancorp.com/productfamily.php?id=85 which I use for 3 point video lighting.
Posted 6 Dec 2014
Edited by johntisbury 6 Dec 2014
Mr_Catz
Photographer
Mr_Catz

This is where I get my energy-saving natural daylight bulbs for my house -
http://www.lightbulbs-direct.com/crompton-non-dimmable-led-12w-gls-warm-white-bc-frosted/p3970/
Posted 5 March 2015
Edited by Mr_Catz 5 March 2015
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
HMI's another alternative if requiring lighting for video production. Not quite the same power savings (~1/3rd rather than 1/10th) but they do have a high CRI (they were developed for film/television afterall) and are daylight balanced. Expensive though and don't have the longevity of LED (although better than tungsten iirc). There's a few makes that are 'affordable', Hedler being one of the cheaper ones that I looked at at last year's photography show.
Posted 5 March 2015
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