Photography....

15 posts
25 Aug 2014
Hi, Just wondering if anyone can give me some advice, I've modelled before and currently work as a freelance make-up artist but i really want to get into photography. Obviously i know it takes years and lots of hard work to become successful but im just wanting to know where to start. Can anyone recommend a course or any advice? Thank you
Posted 25 Aug 2014
eosfan
Photographer
eosfan
Hi,
I started by doing a basic photography course in the evenings, at my local tech. college - maybe worth looking at what your local colleges offer.

Dave

Posted 25 Aug 2014
gminfocus
Photographer
gminfocus
Going to college generally takes quite some time to complete a course and will cover projects which may not be of particular benefit to you. So you might do best to get a nice local photographer to mentor you in the styles of photography you want to work in. And practice, practice, practice. A far quicker return on your time.

G.

Posted 25 Aug 2014
mph
Photographer
mph
Offer TFPT - where PT is Photography tuition!

Posted 25 Aug 2014
IainT
Photographer
IainT
A camera is a simple tool and photography is not difficult if you can take a picture. Don't listen to people who try to complicate it. Don't listen to people trying to baffle you with technical stuff. Don't listen to people who try to sell you stuff you don't need.

All you need to learn are the 3 basic functions of a camera. Aperture (the hole which lets the light in) shutter speed (how quickly the camera opens and closes to let light in) and iso (rule of thumb, the less light you have the higher iso setting you need.

Forget everything else and spend your time learning these. (or if you can't or can't be bothered, get a good quality compact camera (one which gives the option to shoot raw) and use auto settings...seriously!) Once you understand these basic functions and can get images which are roughly correctly exposed you are most of the way there as far as technical stuff goes. The next stage is taking a picture, thats more important than anything. Most people cannot and no amount of teaching will help if you simply cannot take a picture.

Then...and this is absolutely the most important part of photography. Learn basic processing techniques in Lightroom or some other programme, its not difficult even I can do it and I have the computer skills of an ape wearing boxing gloves.

You do not need expensive courses...although a course in processing would be money well spent.
You do not need an expensive camera
You do not need expensive equipment
Treat the "rules" of photography with healthy scepticism and ignore them completely when you feel like it.

How you get an image is not important. All that's important is if its a good picture or not.




Posted 25 Aug 2014
smooth_image
Photographer
smooth_image
Hi Niaomi I am just down the road from you and we have worked together, I would be more than happy to teach you what I know, Not sure what style or type your looking for but I do all aspects from Models to Triathlons to weddings. Get in touch, I also have a camera you can use while your learning Cheers Graham
Posted 25 Aug 2014
artistoli
Photographer
artistoli
IainT

A camera is a simple tool and photography is not difficult if you can take a picture. Don't listen to people who try to complicate it. Don't listen to people trying to baffle you with technical stuff. Don't listen to people who try to sell you stuff you don't need. All you need to learn are the 3 basic functions of a camera. Aperture (the hole which lets the light in) shutter speed (how quickly the camera opens and closes to let light in) and iso (rule of thumb, the less light you have the higher iso setting you need. Forget everything else and spend your time learning these. (or if you can't or can't be bothered, get a good quality compact camera (one which gives the option to shoot raw) and use auto settings...seriously!) Once you understand these basic functions and can get images which are roughly correctly exposed you are most of the way there as far as technical stuff goes. The next stage is taking a picture, thats more important than anything. Most people cannot and no amount of teaching will help if you simply cannot take a picture. Then...and this is absolutely the most important part of photography. Learn basic processing techniques in Lightroom or some other programme, its not difficult even I can do it and I have the computer skills of an ape wearing boxing gloves. You do not need expensive courses...although a course in processing would be money well spent. You do not need an expensive camera You do not need expensive equipment Treat the "rules" of photography with healthy scepticism and ignore them completely when you feel like it. How you get an image is not important. All that's important is if its a good picture or not.


Spot on. You can pick up the technical aspects (or at least the principles of the technicalities) relatively easily. The real challenge is the creative aspect; getting those moments from the models. There are loads of photographers who can produce consistently brilliant photographs, technically, but aren't so many who can produce images with that special something. Of course, if you are looking at photography as a commercial venture then the technical aspects are probably most important, but if you are looking at it as an art form then its the latter. 

Posted 25 Aug 2014
Edited by artistoli 25 Aug 2014
HowardJ
Photographer
HowardJ
Practice. Practice. Practice.

Posted 25 Aug 2014
SandyCamel
Photographer
SandyCamel
IainT

A camera is a simple tool and photography is not difficult if you can take a picture. Don't listen to people who try to complicate it. Don't listen to people trying to baffle you with technical stuff. Don't listen to people who try to sell you stuff you don't need. All you need to learn are the 3 basic functions of a camera. Aperture (the hole which lets the light in) shutter speed (how quickly the camera opens and closes to let light in) and iso (rule of thumb, the less light you have the higher iso setting you need. Forget everything else and spend your time learning these. (or if you can't or can't be bothered, get a good quality compact camera (one which gives the option to shoot raw) and use auto settings...seriously!) Once you understand these basic functions and can get images which are roughly correctly exposed you are most of the way there as far as technical stuff goes. The next stage is taking a picture, thats more important than anything. Most people cannot and no amount of teaching will help if you simply cannot take a picture. Then...and this is absolutely the most important part of photography. Learn basic processing techniques in Lightroom or some other programme, its not difficult even I can do it and I have the computer skills of an ape wearing boxing gloves. You do not need expensive courses...although a course in processing would be money well spent. You do not need an expensive camera You do not need expensive equipment Treat the "rules" of photography with healthy scepticism and ignore them completely when you feel like it. How you get an image is not important. All that's important is if its a good picture or not.



In essence, so very true.




Posted 25 Aug 2014
mph
Photographer
mph
Don't take the bloody mystique away !
Posted 25 Aug 2014
davidhibberd
Photographer
davidhibberd
IainT

A camera is a simple tool and photography is not difficult if you can take a picture. Don't listen to people who try to complicate it. Don't listen to people trying to baffle you with technical stuff. Don't listen to people who try to sell you stuff you don't need.  


Well said

Posted 25 Aug 2014
Thank you everyone
Posted 25 Aug 2014
paulford
Photographer
paulford
Might be a silly question but have you got a camera?

Posted 25 Aug 2014
paulford
Photographer
paulford
Or have you got access to one that has control over apertures and shutter speeds.


Posted 25 Aug 2014
Alan_Jay
Photographer
Alan_Jay
Hi Naomi,
What Ian says is very true,  though knowing the 'rules' will always be a help.  Then you can break them with the intention of doing so!
e.g the rule of thirds explains why certain composition works.  Putting the main focus on a third line,  draws attention to it;  Putting it where two lines cross tends to to draw maximum attention to it.  (when I learnt it,  I checked some classic paintings and was surprised at just how many work to this rule!)

Depth of field is something that often trips up new photographers.  Remembering that: the bigger the number, the smaller the hole - the greater the depth of field,  will be useful in any genre of photography.  The 'number' being the Aperture or fstop.  This is why portrait photographers use a lowish number and landscape photographers tend to use a big number.
A good practice exercise, is to set up a line of 10 ish bottles;  standing at one end and slightly to the side,  so that you can see them all,  take a series of photos.  Set the camera on a tripod or table,  so that it remains in the same place. Focus in the same place,  but go through the apertures.  When you look at them on your PC,  you will see how the depth of field changes.

Looking around the viewfinder BEFORE pressing the shutter release!  Mostly we concentrate on the subject we are photographing, understandably!  By looking around the viewfinder you are likely to notice what else will be included and avoid sloping horisons, telegraph poles growing out of peoples' heads etc.

Take your time.  There are no prizes for taking the most photos in any given time period.

As you look at your photos,  ask yourself why they do or do not work.  You will probably learn more from the 'bad' photos,  than you do from the great ones.

There is a wealth of information on the internet.

Ask people questions.  Whilst a few are precious about technique etc.,  most of us are very happy to chat or answer questions.

Have fun.
Posted 26 Aug 2014
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