Russian "New wave" photography.

Russian "New wave" photography.

10 posts
11 June 2014
Lysander
Photographer
Lysander
http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2014/jun/10/24-photographers-russia

Russian and Russian émigré photography.

Posted 11 June 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Is it me or are quite a few of them the sort of thing that you'd expect from the Taylor Wessing?

Posted 11 June 2014
Socialdisaster
Photographer
Socialdisast..
There doesn't seem, to me, to be anything particularly... brilliant, or original, there.

Perhaps it's the usual case of Russia being a few years behind the rest?

Posted 11 June 2014
DJ200
Photographer
DJ200
+1

Posted 11 June 2014
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/close-and-far-russian-photography-now/

This exhibition looks a better opportunity to form a judgement than a few snaps in the Guardian.



Posted 11 June 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
stolenfaces

http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/close-and-far-russian-photography-now/ This exhibition looks a better opportunity to form a judgement than a few snaps in the Guardian.


I'd be willing to bet our judgements won't change though.
Posted 11 June 2014
OldMaster
Photographer
OldMaster
"Perhaps it's the usual case of Russia being a few years behind the rest"?!!!!!!!

Just one of the most artistic and creative societies in history...ballet, music and composers, musicians, authors, architecture to mention just a few. Of course the "Revolution" changed their "society" but just because a country has a different outlook and politics,(attitudes and censorship I fundamentally disagree with), does not mean it is not capable of being creative? Indeed if their current culture is in any way reflected in their artistic output that may well be of interest?

Perhaps if we are able to embrace it, celebrate it and give it the oxygen of publicity it we may actually be able over time to be instrumental in opening up their society rather than just the negativity of the "Us and Them" responses I read here?

I think seeing the work might also be more useful than taking a guess?

Posted 12 June 2014
Lysander
Photographer
Lysander
RedChecker

Is it me or are quite a few of them the sort of thing that you'd expect from the Taylor Wessing?


It's easy to get stuck into viewing commercial-style photography as being the 'correct' way to photograph things as it often has a superficial gloss which can be very attractive to the eye.

A lot of contemporary 'art' or 'alternative' photography uses a paired-down methodology and aesthetic style.
This may be in reaction to and rejection of 'commercial artifice', or, it may stem from art-world snobbery against the mechanical craft of photography, or for other unknown reasons, but, it does serve as a reminder that there is a big photographic world outside of the usual mainstream work we are saturated with.


Like it or hate it, it doesn't matter, as long as it gives you an oppertunity to think about how you want to explore photography.


Posted 12 June 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Lysander

It's easy to get stuck into viewing commercial-style photography as being the 'correct' way to photograph things as it often has a superficial gloss which can be very attractive to the eye.

A lot of contemporary 'art' or 'alternative' photography uses a paired-down methodology and aesthetic style.
This may be in reaction to and rejection of 'commercial artifice', or, it may stem from art-world snobbery against the mechanical craft of photography, or for other unknown reasons, but, it does serve as a reminder that there is a big photographic world outside of the usual mainstream work we are saturated with.


Like it or hate it, it doesn't matter, as long as it gives you an oppertunity to think about how you want to explore photography.




I appreciate not all photography needs to be sterile and technically perfect but at the very least I want to see effort (as with any creative medium be it art, music, craft or film).  I also believe with photography that certain rules are there for a reason, and for the most part they do ring true with good aesthetics etc. and are often what makes a good image a great one (or vice versa).

The images in the OPs post seem (to me) to be devoid of effort, or something special that catches my eye.  Nothing to do with lack of commercial sterility.
Posted 12 June 2014
Lysander
Photographer
Lysander
How different people can look at the same 'subject-matter' and come diametrically opposite conclusions is fascinating and wonderful. One person might view photography as a process of addition, like painting for example, where layers and brush-strokes of pigment are added until the image is completed, whereas others might view it as being akin to sculpture, where material is removed until only the sculpture remains. I feel that the images show effort in finding the 'overlooked' and pairing the craft down to it's essentials in order to allow the mundane or everyday aspects to stand out 'warts and all'. Perhaps it's a bit like viewing photography with a European aesthetic with regards to composition, perspective, lighting and subject matter, and then seeing an Oriental aesthetic with different 'Zen' rules?
Posted 12 June 2014
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