All Change

15 posts
9 June 2014
paulbatterbury
Photographer
paulbatterbu..
Hey people

Yes.. you know that feeling you get, when you just want to start again, well for a while now I not been overly happy with work in general, there have been lots of things I wanted to do and achieve with photography, but most of the models I work with don’t like to work late, get cold or wet, regardless if you are paying them or not and in the majority of case they do get paid.

So I decide to go back to university (distance learning) and get a BA, as it will push me to take on the challenges that I keep putting off and for some time now I have been feeling that I need some sort of qualification in photography, and one that will open doors to other work. I do like shooting glamour photography, and it is not a case of me saying no to it, but I always liked the look and style of fashion models more… it not about boobs with me. So I looking forward to producing some new and different stuff in the future, field of focus, time lapse and working in different forms or light.

If anyone has any suggestions or tips that I can play around with before I start my course if they have done a BA (in photography) themselves that would be cool and greatly appreciated .  Meanwhile I will be cahnging around alot of my current portoflio.

Posted 9 June 2014
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictu..
You're plainly not a complete duffer in photography terms Paul, and I'd seriously question how much further a degree course would push you? I'm fairly certain very few clients will give a stuff if you've a degree or not; factors such as style, price, business sense and mostly your portfolio will have more impact. Had you considered picking some photographers who you admire and who offer training, and go in direct for tuition? I'll admit the opinion offered is based on having seen too many supposedly 'qualified' photographers and lecturers who's work is dated and largely inept to be able to view that arena very seriously.

Posted 9 June 2014
paulbatterbury
Photographer
paulbatterbu..
I know what you saying, and here are my reasons, when you have a qualification, it gives you confidence and you speak or advise with conviction. Have a BA opens up many more possibilities, such as working with the media, and this may sound odd, I quite fancy do some photo journalism so I need some sort of foothold with AP.

The last thing is I want to different things, have the option to do that, people don’t always take, having coursework to complete will force my hand to take those options.

I am already finding some stigma having down glamour photography for so long, so 98% of people look at the model and not the surrounding environment, lighting or style of photography.

Last thing in, there are little in the way of photographers in Normandy and photographers who I like are such people as Gavin Bond and Lee Strickland and I would love to do something along the lines they do.

People in the UK and very much bound with celebrity and glamour, and as long as you can take a good picture, there is little more you can or need to do, and for that many photographers never evolve their skill or talent, where I wish to push myself and learn, professional photographers should be flexible over a range of styles, not just stuck with one niche such as glamour or they self limit the amount and type of work they can do.

Hence going for the BA, and unlike my BSc in computer science, it will not go out of date, and it is Art based and not technology based.


Posted 10 June 2014
HowardJ
Photographer
HowardJ
How long is doing a BA in photography going to take via distance learning?

I find photography is one of those things that its probably easier to learn by shadowing or assisting another photographer instead of submitting assignments via email or post and waiting for the feedback to arrive.

I can understand your desire to get a formal qualification but is distance learning the best approach?

I did a post-grad course via distance learning and it was mind numbingly boring. I sent off the assignments over a period of 8 months and got the marks back and then did the exam. I guess things may have moved on since I did mine.

Have you looked at some of the courses on creative live or some of the american colleges who are embracing the internet and rich media?

Posted 10 June 2014
Edited by HowardJ 10 June 2014
Liteangle
Photographer
Liteangle
Hi Paul,
I found the City & Guilds courses useful. As well as the practical stuff it taught me a lot of theory about what makes a good photograph and it 'forced' me to try things I wouldn't have considered e.g. I did one project on abstract architecture, something completely new to me then and which I now find interesting and have done more of since.

I understand a degree course is less about skills and technique, that's a given. It's more about the artistic and creative side of photography. It involves a lot of research on the work of photographers, analysing it, saying what you like and dislike about it, and perhaps doing a project based on that learning.

Alan

Posted 10 June 2014
paulbatterbury
Photographer
paulbatterbu..
Hey Alan

I looked at doing a Gity and Guilds a few years ago, but there were none near me, I also look at a-level but was told by a friend who teaches it, that it would do me no good, I was to advanced.

CGLI courses are great for practical skills, you get plenty of hands on and I would knock them at all, but looking professionally at a lot of contract job positions they are asking for a BA. I already have a degree, and you are right in some respect, a degree in normally an academic qualification not a skill qualification (really wish employer would learn that) however where photography is concerned the course is very much coursework based, as are many creative fields, and that is how and why they can offer such a course over distance learning.

If it come to the case of being analytical over other work, that is ok, having an analytical background after doing a BSc and the psychology behind media will pay dividends, but a few people are saying I will find it too easy or boring, the problem is I need to get into more press related work and a job role where my dyslexia will not be an issue.

Thanks for the insight.

Regards

Paul


Posted 11 June 2014
Liteangle
Photographer
Liteangle
Hi Paul,
I wasn't suggesting C&G for you, I was new to photography so I got a fair bit out of it. If you suffer from dyslexia then a lot of written work might not be the thing. From what you are saying I would have thought practical experience would count for much more than academic qualifications to media related customers/employers/hirers. Perhaps you could find a way to shadow a top pro or at least get some of your best press-related work in front of the decision makers? Anyway, good luck.

Alan

Posted 11 June 2014
Hugh
Photographer
Hugh
Could you talk your way onto an MA course with the BSc you already have?
One year full time/two years part time for the MA.
I was thinking of trying this a while ago.

Worth looking at the Open University.


Posted 11 June 2014
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
Does anyone value a BA in photography unless it is from a top collage like Univerity of the Arts .
And will you learn anything ? It won't cover anything practical if it's a proper BA.
I have a friend with a recent BA in photography. I had to show her how to produce photos suitable for magazines (as in dpi is irrelevant, toal pixel dimensions is key)
Even her back-up strategy was dubious.
She knows quite a lot about fiddling with film, and wrote quite a lot of essays but I'm not sure she did much useful for real life photography.
Fortunately she is a decent photographer and a reasonable communicator as I don't think anyone would care that she has a degree in photography.

I can't see from your opening post what benefits you can seriously expect to reap.


Posted 11 June 2014
Edited by stolenfaces 11 June 2014
paulbatterbury
Photographer
paulbatterbu..
Hugh

Could you talk your way onto an MA course with the BSc you already have? One year full time/two years part time for the MA. I was thinking of trying this a while ago. Worth looking at the Open University.


They don't run any photography courses.
Posted 11 June 2014
paulbatterbury
Photographer
paulbatterbu..
When I asked for suggestions and tips it was aimed at more artistic line off work.

I already have 10 year experience under my belt with published work and gaining a BA will open doors for me.

Many people do not understand what a BA or MA is about, you don’t sit on a degree course to learn how to take photos, so please everyone stop by saying you won’t learn anything. Degrees are about achievement and self motivated study and research, there are many careers in photography that REQUIRE you to have a BA or MA.

I already have a BSc so I am full aware of what goes into a degree having already gained one and the is why Hugh above has rightly said I should be able to access an MA.

So please people, lets us start to talk about the Art of photography.


Posted 12 June 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
paulbatterbury

I already have 10 year experience under my belt with published work and gaining a BA will open doors for me


Really??
Posted 12 June 2014
Hugh
Photographer
Hugh
Two recent BA photography grads I know - daughter's friends - it certainly hasn't helped them at all.

Minimum you need is an MA - probably from one of the top London schools.

Sorry to be pessimistic.

Posted 12 June 2014
tc66
Photographer
tc66
Just thought i'd add a good luck and look forward to seeing the different results you produce.

More than anything, have fun

TC

Posted 12 June 2014
paulbatterbury
Photographer
paulbatterbu..
tc66

Just thought i'd add a good luck and look forward to seeing the different results you produce. More than anything, have fun TC


Thank you Mr Chance, I hope all is well in sunny Blighty with you and yes I am very much looking forward to doing different stuff, it will be a great experience.   


Posted 12 June 2014
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