Ticks & Tick Bites - be very careful.

Ticks & Tick Bites - be very careful.

25 posts
1 June 2014
AlisterAberdeen
Photographer
AlisterAberd..
Hi,

After conversations with a couple of models, I thought it was worth posting about ticks.

They are small, external, parasites, who bite, and take blood. Some carry disease. I know that some parts of the Scottish highlands and the new forest have problems with Lyme Disease, which can be carried and transmitted by ticks.

Both models and photographers should take care when shooting in heavily vegetated areas, and always check themselves thoroughly after a shoot.

If you do get a tick, don't panic, but ensure you remove the tick using a special tick remover (can be bought cheaply from an outdoor shop), make sure you remove all the tick, and clean the bite thoroughly.

If you develop a red mark around the bite, go to your doctor straight away.



Posted 1 June 2014
Oh, I thought you meant ticks like twitches!
Posted 1 June 2014
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictu..
Around Thetford forest where I often shoot in Norfolk, the high number of deer mean ticks are really common too. As the op says, it's easy to pick one up ( I think they hang around on the tops of blades of grass and wait for someone to wander past?) certainly I've collected some ecen with socks and trousers on. It's well worth doing a tick check as soon as you can as you usually don't feel them and they can climb up legs under your clothes pretty successfully and will burrow their jaws and legs into the skin, hanging on really firmly.

I tend to drench the tick in TCP for a minute or two, new ones often drop out then, or burn their bums with a cigarette end to make them release. Tweezers might be helpful at the head end only to assist pulling them out and check for legs and parts left behind before giving a good squeeze to flush the area through with clean blood an apply an antiseptic cream under a plaster. Check for redness and see your Dr if you feel unwell. Lymes can be pretty debilitating so I understand though I've had easily 20 or more ticks with no symptoms.

This time of the year I'd spray jungle formula or similar on my legs or areas touching the ground to put off ticks and other insect irritants.

Posted 1 June 2014
DorsetHammer
Photographer
DorsetHammer
It's a good point.

I live on the edge of the New Forest and the ignorance of ticks and the diseases that can be transmitted by them is quite worrying. I have a friend who developed encephalitis as a result of a tick bite, unfortunately living as he does within an area of the Forest frequented by deer there was a good chance he might get at least a bite, fortunately after a lengthy period of recovery he is fine now.



Posted 1 June 2014
mph
Photographer
mph
profilepictures

I tend to drench the tick in TCP for a minute or two, new ones often drop out then, or burn their bums with a cigarette end to make them release.



Is not a good way!

Heating a tick (with a cigarette end, hot match, or cigarette lighter) or freezing a tick (with a freezing spray or ice) may cause the fluids inside it (saliva and gut contents) to be forced out into the bloodstream of the person or animal it is attached to. These fluids may contain disease-causing organisms. These methods can also cause injury to the person or animal the tick is attached to, and damage the body of the tick, which may cause fluids to spill, or the mouth parts to break away. Whilst the tick might drop off using these methods, a serious infection or injury may also result.

(From Borreliosis and Associated Diseases Awareness UK)

To remove a tick that is attached to your skin

  • Gently grip the tick as close to the point of attachment to the skin as possible. Do this preferably using fine-toothed tweezers or forceps, or a tick removal device.
  • Pull steadily upwards, away from the skin. Take care not to crush the tick.

Inexpensive tick removal devices may be available at veterinary surgeries and pet supply shops, and are useful for people who are frequently exposed to ticks. These should be used in accordance with manufacturers' instructions.

Do NOT do any of the following:

  • Burn the tick off (for example, using lighted cigarette ends or match heads).
  • Apply petroleum jelly, alcohol, nail varnish remover, or other substances (as this may stimulate the tick to regurgitate potentially infected material into the skin, which may increase the risk of transmission of infection).
  • Use your fingers to pull the tick off.
  • Squeeze the tick.
(From Patient.co.uk)

Posted 1 June 2014
Edited by mph 1 June 2014
Crippen
Photographer
Crippen
Thanks for posting this.

I have only one shoot planned for this year, a film project, which, if all goes to plan, is predominantly set up in the Inner Hebrides (September/October time). I've been reading up about midges and how tourists are advised to wear nets during the height of summer. Hence my reason for shooting in September.

I hadn't considered ticks. There are Deer, Shetland Cattle and wild Ponies, on the Islands, so presumably ticks will be an issue too. Especially if my actors are running about half naked.

And what nasty critters may lurk in some of those ponds and lakes up there. Apart from Nessie.

Do ticks (like midges) die off later in the year, perhaps as soon as the frosts appear, or are they a problem all year round?

Cheers
Dave



Posted 1 June 2014
Kiboko
Photographer
Kiboko
Far simpler, something that's always worked for me whenever I've had them, (often when I've been walking in woodland around the Salisbury Plain area, and I presume they're probably sheep ticks), - is to simply have a long soak in a hot bath. They then just detach themselves.

Posted 1 June 2014
frankpht
Photographer
frankpht
Jesus it's wonder I'm still alive. Haven't had a bath in 15 years.

Posted 1 June 2014
JeromeRazoir
Photographer
JeromeRazoir
Crippen

Thanks for posting this. I have only one shoot planned for this year, a film project, which, if all goes to plan, is predominantly set up in the Inner Hebrides (September/October time). I've been reading up about midges and how tourists are advised to wear nets during the height of summer. Hence my reason for shooting in September. I hadn't considered ticks. There are Deer, Shetland Cattle and wild Ponies, on the Islands, so presumably ticks will be an issue too. Especially if my actors are running about half naked. And what nasty critters may lurk in some of those ponds and lakes up there. Apart from Nessie. Do ticks (like midges) die off later in the year, perhaps as soon as the frosts appear, or are they a problem all year round? Cheers Dave


Other beasties can include leaches if you are going into water. I am not aware of any chemical leach repelant. Repelants for mosquitos would, presumably, be effective against ticks aswell. Mosquitos LOVE me, so I use Autan in large dises. Stinks but keeps them away.
Posted 1 June 2014
AlisterAberdeen
Photographer
AlisterAberd..
Maybe a quick recap would help:

Midgies, extremely annoying and irrating, but pose no health hazard.

Ticks, can carry diseases ( in the UK, most commonly lymes diseases) that if not treated, can cause significant health problems. Ticks are often found in overgrown areas, where there are wild animals - often sheep and deer. Obviously, for any model and photographer shooting in a forest, or other wild area, where lymes disease is known to be present, this is a risk.

An insect repellent may help to prevent ticks. You should check yourself thoroughly after going somewhere "wild" and if you do find ticks, remove with a specially designed tick remover, which can usually be bought for under £5 in an outdoor wear shop.

Nhs.co.uk has a good section on ticks and lymes disease, including where it is most common, and what symptoms you should look for.

Posted 1 June 2014
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictu..
Yeh, mph's treatment suggestions make more sense
Posted 1 June 2014
Keltica
Photographer
Keltica
Plenty of ticks in the New Forest, around the Guildford area, even in Bushy Park due to the Deer.



Posted 1 June 2014
mph
Photographer
mph
DEET is an excellent mosquito repellent, but it is a fairly poor tick repellent. We are inundated with so many DEET repellents because there are several huge corporations that manufacture hundreds of variations of DEET products. There is only one small company, Coulston Laboratory, that markets a handful of competitive tick repellent products for human use that contain 0.5 % permethrin. There are pros and cons to each product, but as a tick repellent, permethrin wins hands down. Permethrin is an insecticide derived from a chemical found in the chrysanthemum family of plants. It is a spray that is used on clothes only, and is deactivated and made less effective by the oils on our skin. Once it is sprayed on our clothing, it becomes odorless and can last for several weeks with a single application. Once it is applied, most ticks will curl up and fall off if they make contact, and will eventually die if there is prolonged exposure. According to LymeNet Europe. On the other hand Repel Ticks: Use DEET Of all the various insect repellents available, DEET has been shown to be the most effective at repelling ticks. “There is pretty good data that DEET works against ticks,” confirms Durland Fish, professor of epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health. Other repellents, including those that contain picaridin, are simply not proven to fend off the blood-suckers. “We’re pretty confident that DEET works,” agrees Dr. Tom Mather, director of the Center for Vector-Borne Disease at the University of Rhode Island and its Tick Encounter Resource Center. “Those other repellents have just not been effectively tested against ticks.” Kill Ticks: Use Permethrin DEET may work at repelling ticks, but Mather advises it only as a second line of defense. His top recommendation: Wear tick-repellent clothing treated with permethrin, which kills ticks after only five to 30 seconds of exposure. “Permethrin is dried into your clothes,” Mather explains, “and if you purchase treated clothing or have it commercially treated, it can last 70 washings.” (Insect Shield, which produces its own line of insect-repellent apparel, will treat clothing for $8 to $10 an item.) Alternatively, you can treat clothing yourself, though home treatments last for only about four to five washings, Mather says. Pays your money and .........
Posted 1 June 2014
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictu..
Ticks your choice?

Posted 1 June 2014
mph
Photographer
mph
profilepictures

Ticks your choice?


Posted 1 June 2014
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