Act of Valour

23 posts
20 April 2014
Chandos
Photographer
Chandos
Cant't believe I have'nt seen this yet but it is on tonight 9.00pm Channel 5. This movie is best known amongst the indie filmmaker community who was part of the video dSLR revolution, not for its content but that it was almost if not exclusively shot with the Canon 5DMkII.

Posted 20 April 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
According to imdb it was one of seven types of camera used for filming...

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1591479/technical?ref_=tt_dt_spec

Posted 20 April 2014
Chandos
Photographer
Chandos
That why I said "almost". The action shots using first person perspective were exclusively 5Ds so I should have made myself clear on that but the movie is mostly shot with the 5DMkII. IMDB does'nt mention if cameras were use only for production stills, if footage from a particular camera made the final cut. When the movie started shooting in early 2009 initially it was shot alongside other cameras because the manual feature of the 5DMkII at the time was very limited but when manual feature arrived later that year it was virtually all 5Ds with the odd 7D apart from some aerial shots. The entire movie is 70% shot from 5DMkII while 20% shot using film, 5% Sony HDC-F950 and the rest others.
Posted 20 April 2014
Edited by Chandos 20 April 2014
HowardJ
Photographer
HowardJ
That's amazing.

Isn't there a short limit on the length of a video clip on the mkII?

Posted 20 April 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
29 minutes 59 seconds. This is due to a European tax iirc on video recording devices, and is common among most stills cameras that record video.

Posted 20 April 2014
jivago
Photographer
jivago
It's not an 'Act of Valour' to shoot with Canon kit - Because 'Discretion is the Better Part of Valour''   - Therefore you wouldn't
Posted 21 April 2014
Edited by jivago 20 April 2014
Chandos
Photographer
Chandos
The 5DMkII has a continous recording limit of 4Gb and in HD mode it is around 12mins clip because CF card are formatted using Fat32. You could use an external recorder with HDMI out which is only limited to the size of the external HDD.

Posted 21 April 2014
Edited by Chandos 21 April 2014
Crippen
Photographer
Crippen
Can you not wirelessly save footage straight to a laptop these days?



If you're interested in DSLR movies, can I also recommend a little Zombie/Buddy Movie movie called 'The Battery'.

http://watch.thebatterymovie.com

Not only is it very good, but it was shot entirely on a 5DMKII, for $6k. According to their website it was shot in two weeks, with a crew (for most of those two weeks) of only 6 people.

I saw this projected onto a cinema screen at a Horror Film Festival back in November and was extremely impressed by how good it looked, blown up.

Below is a snap of the film makers entire kit.




Dave
Posted 21 April 2014
Edited by Crippen 21 April 2014
Chandos
Photographer
Chandos
I no longer uses dSLR for movies anymore, last shot a video at an event about 2 years ago. I first started shooting video on my 5DMkII over 5 years ago for fun, it was a novelty because of the large sensor, resaonable DR and good lowlight but the detail sucks because of comperession and line skipping not least poor rolling shutter. Over the years I seen many small production companies popping up everywhere using dSLRs as their main camera, some were good, most were so so but all have the same compressed look and 95% of these filmmakers are suckers for extreme DOF that focuses back and forth.


Posted 21 April 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Crippen

Can you not wirelessly save footage straight to a laptop these days?



Not HD video footage, there's way too much bandwidth needed for wireless (my 6D records at around 91mbps iirc for 1080P, and even broadcast standard MXF is 50mbps).

dSLRs filled a nice gap for the enthusiast a few years ago but all of the dedicated manufacturers of film/video equipment have caught up fast and for any serious film maker there are many far more suitable options out there, many of which have gone the next step in recording 4k (which only a handful of dSLRs are capable of at present).
Posted 21 April 2014
Edited by RedChecker 21 April 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Chandos

 and 95% of these filmmakers are suckers for extreme DOF that focuses back and forth.


And therein lies the skill with making films (along with avoiding things like rolling shutter), as it's not really a gear problem and more of a user problem hence why dedicated (pro grade) camcorders are arguably better suited for most people's needs due to ergonomics and features like focus assist etc.
Posted 21 April 2014
Edited by RedChecker 21 April 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Out of curiosity... has anyone seen The Hobbit (part 2) on BluRay yet?

There's a scene where they're riding the barrels in the rapids that looks like they used some sort of shitty action cam in them like a GoPro (it's very evident the footage quality is different and the shutter speed is way too high IMO). I was quite surprised by this bit of cost-cutting as it's so obvious and doesn't fit with the rest of the film (a work colleague who doesn't do photography/video pointed it out).
Posted 21 April 2014
Edited by RedChecker 21 April 2014
Chandos
Photographer
Chandos
Establish video camera manufacturers the high end ones like Arii and Red did not need to catch up with dSLR, they were streets ahead already. It was the sensor size and affordability of dSLRs that struck a cord with budget indie filmmakers and competed well against high end consumer cams.
What changed in the last couple of years is new companies making better video cameras at competitive prices and higher end consumer cams got cheaper and better.

Posted 21 April 2014
Edited by Chandos 21 April 2014
Chandos
Photographer
Chandos
RedChecker
And therein lies the skill with making films (along with avoiding things like rolling shutter), as it's not really a gear problem and more of a user problem hence why dedicated (pro grade) camcorders are arguably better suited for most people's needs due to ergonomics and features like focus assist etc.
Most video capable dSLR especially the early ones suffers from bad rolling shutter so I would say it is a gear problem as well as the user. dSLR is primary made for still photos not video. The extreme shallow DOF footage focussing in and out I see in 95% of dSLR videos was actually deliberate so it seems. I did ask one why they shoot that way all the time and they told me the client preferred it. Well I don't. Some thinks it is cool, I just find it annoying.
Posted 21 April 2014
Edited by Chandos 21 April 2014
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Simon, you've misinterpreted what I said. The catching up comment was referring to making gear 'affordable' to the lower end market for enthusiast and low budget film makers (yes, I'm fully aware that at the top-end there's no comparison).

Cost wise Arri now produce 'affordable' cameras with both the Alexa and newly released Amira. Sony, Panasonic and Canon as well as a plethoria of other makes now also produce 'affordable' cameras for films.

I would not class Red as affordable personally.
Posted 21 April 2014
Edited by RedChecker 21 April 2014
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