Spiders!

9 posts
18 March 2014
Hello everyone

Well I need help in identifying this odd looking spider that was in my Garden the other day, looks possibly like a Mouse Spider but I don't know and would like to know!!

Yes I am female and no I am not afraid of spiders or bugs


Posted 18 March 2014
Edited by Hazel_Ashton 18 March 2014
MadMod
Make Up Artist
MadMod
It looks like it might be a female Badumna insignis.
Posted 18 March 2014
frankpht
Photographer
frankpht
Aaagh spider run and I'm a guy. If this is a mouse spider does that mean it can kill mice. If that's so then it's one MF.

Posted 18 March 2014
MadMod

It looks like it might be a female Badumna insignis.


Ohhh interesting looks very similar! And it is from NZ and Australia wonder how it got here 

A mouse spider is http://www.uksafari.com/mousespider.htm
Posted 18 March 2014
We've actually had another unusual creature -

This is a magpie moth from what I have been told and is uncommon up North indecision


Posted 18 March 2014
HowardJ
Photographer
HowardJ
Blimey that's one big spider!!

Posted 18 March 2014
Kiboko
Photographer
Kiboko
Not a Magpie, moth, a Small Magpie. It's very common in the southern half of Britain, becoming less so further north, and flies in June and July. The larva feeds from a rolled or spun leaf in August and September before hibernating in a tough silk cocoon in a hollow stem or under bark. Pupation occurs in May in the same cocoon, without further feeding.
The Magpie Moth is a medium-sized moth which is quite butterfly like in appearance. It is on the wing during summer when it can be frequently found in gardens, as well as woodland, scrub and heather moorland. The Magpie Moth overwinters as a caterpillar and pupates in late spring. Widespread in England, Wales and the lowlands of Scotland.
The intriguing thing is the fact that it's flying NOW - it's far too early for it! Can't help with the spider I'm afraid, beyond my expertise.

Posted 18 March 2014
speedway45
Photographer
speedway45
Everything is common,sorry uncommon up north.
Hazel_Ashton
We've actually had another unusual creature - This is a magpie moth from what I have been told and is uncommon up North 
Posted 19 March 2014
Kiboko

Not a Magpie, moth, a Small Magpie. It's very common in the southern half of Britain, becoming less so further north, and flies in June and July. The larva feeds from a rolled or spun leaf in August and September before hibernating in a tough silk cocoon in a hollow stem or under bark. Pupation occurs in May in the same cocoon, without further feeding. The Magpie Moth is a medium-sized moth which is quite butterfly like in appearance. It is on the wing during summer when it can be frequently found in gardens, as well as woodland, scrub and heather moorland. The Magpie Moth overwinters as a caterpillar and pupates in late spring. Widespread in England, Wales and the lowlands of Scotland. The intriguing thing is the fact that it's flying NOW - it's far too early for it! Can't help with the spider I'm afraid, beyond my expertise.



Oooooh interesting! Quite pleased about it, normally you just get your plain bog standard boring ones  
Posted 21 March 2014
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