copy cat yes or no

copy cat yes or no

14 posts
13 Feb 2014
SDuell
Photographer
SDuell
so i recently saw a load of images by a photographer who did a shoot involving a lake and the model getting all muddy now would it be wrong to try and do a simular shoot cause i really liked the idea and the images were really good i wouldnt do the exact same thing i would put my own spin on the idea have you ever seen images and thought id like to try that? or think thats a really good idea wonder if i could do that? or would you be really annoyied someone tryied to copy your work? or would you think it was a compliment someone admired your images and wanted to have a go im not one to copy cat peoples ideas but i really really liked it and admired the model for getting so dirty in this cold weather you thoughts?
Posted 13 Feb 2014
Edited by SDuell 13 Feb 2014
PaulManuell
Photographer
PaulManuell
Hello Sam. I'd say go for it. Obviously don't just recreate an exact copy, just follow the idea but put your own spin on it. And personally speaking, I'd be flattered, not annoyed, if someone wanted to recreate a photo I'd taken.

Posted 14 Feb 2014
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictu..
Nothing is new, its all been done before, never set out to copy but accept everything you've seen becomes a reference to you.

But no, don't go out to copy, take a theme and try to make it yours, and better.


Posted 14 Feb 2014
Chances are they wouldn't even notice, I've done about 20 shoots in a lake getting all muddy and none of them looked all that similar.
Different clothing/lighting conditions/photography styles and location all play their part.

I've seen many images which inspire me, I'm sure most people have and its ok to take inspiration from elsewhere - its normal. I would only be annoyed if it was something really really similar - Like if I had a really unusual pose, a teapot on my head and a cat on my shoulder if somebody did exactly that  - only then I would think "hold on thats really quite shitty". Thankfully its only happened a few times but it has annoyed me a little. I find it better to take elements from other shoots - if I like the styling I will do something similar but in a totally different location with different style of photographer etc.

I remember going to a location and doing a nude shoot, I uploaded the images to my blog then a couple of days later I was on another photographers blog, he had taken a model to the same location (months before I had my shoot there) and the model was doing almost the same pose in the exact same spot. I quickly deleted my shots and they have never been put on any of my portfolios - out of respect. It was a complete coincidence that myself and another model chose the same spot to pose and similar poses - I guess thats what happens when you take a model into a dark abandoned building and they find the light then use the interior to pose against. It happens but I would have hated the original model and photographer to think I had directly went out to copy them.



Posted 14 Feb 2014
Edited by Chrissie_Red 14 Feb 2014
Bill_M
Photographer
Bill_M
There is no copyright on ideas. Also, you can be almost sure that the photographer whose work you saw got the idea from someone else. As long as you don't try to make your work an exact copy of his there is no problem.

Posted 14 Feb 2014
OldMaster
Photographer
OldMaster
We are all motivated by what we see and as has been said there is nothing new! Anyway plagiarism is a form of flattery.

What you are saying is you have been inspired by another's work but your location, model and setting will probably be different as will your style..just do it!

Posted 14 Feb 2014
Skid2
Photographer
Skid2
Go for it and put your own mark on the session.

It will never be the same as the original but the new images will be your ideas inspired by someone else with the model adding her input to your ideas

Best of luck and enjoy.

Posted 14 Feb 2014
david1500
Photographer
david1500

If you create a new style you are going to be very rich , just have fun and enjoy yourself .

Posted 15 Feb 2014
stevephot
Photographer
stevephot
If you think that there is much originality in photography you will be very mistaken. Whether is card board boxes on peoples heads, or a particular pose, or heavily dodged and burnt images...whatever it is, i can assure that it had been done by the 1930s There is nothing wrong with plagiarism, its a great way to improve your own photography.
Posted 22 Feb 2014
magpie1
Photographer
magpie1
Plagiarism is pinching all your ideas from 1 place, pinching them from multiple sources is called research! Virtually every theme has been done but if that was the controlling criteria then we'd all have to stop doing anything! Copying established images was long considered essential in painting study, observing technique and process, then people absorb and adapt, producing new variations on a theme.

Should be a good learning experience, give it a go.

Posted 22 Feb 2014
Snipet
Photographer
Snipet
Bill_M
There is no copyright on ideas. Also, you can be almost sure that the photographer whose work you saw got the idea from someone else. As long as you don't try to make your work an exact copy of his there is no problem.
Is that entirely correct though, there was a big case of copyright infringement on a photo of a selective coloured red London bus. And although the 2nd photo also had the red bus selective coloured, the angle, foreground and to an extent the back ground were different. Yet the taker of the original photo won the case.
Posted 23 Feb 2014
Edited by Snipet 23 Feb 2014
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
It wasn't about copyright infringement - the case was about a souvenir company selling a tin of bisuits with distinctive picture on lid. The second company were found to be using a picture on their tin which was similar enough that buyers would be confused. It was therefore a case of passing off (of the biscuits) and more akin to a case where Mcdonalds serve a cease and desist notice on a burger joint using a big yellow M in a different font to the one Macdonalds use.

Posted 23 Feb 2014
KevinJS
Photographer
KevinJS
Hi Sam
Pablo Picasso “Copy everyone except yourself” I good enough for him then good enough for the rest of us

Posted 23 Feb 2014
Snipet
Photographer
Snipet
stolenfaces
It wasn't about copyright infringement - the case was about a souvenir company selling a tin of bisuits with distinctive picture on lid. The second company were found to be using a picture on their tin which was similar enough that buyers would be confused. It was therefore a case of passing off (of the biscuits) and more akin to a case where Mcdonalds serve a cease and desist notice on a burger joint using a big yellow M in a different font to the one Macdonalds use.
Ahhhh I stand corrected, wasnt 100% on the details. Just remembered hearing about it.
Posted 23 Feb 2014
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