How to gain permission to use 'pop songs' in videos ?

How to gain permission to use 'pop songs' in videos ?

19 posts
28 Jan 2014
SandyCamel
Photographer
SandyCamel
I wonder if any-one knows how to go about this please ?


For example, if you were creating a new video / film and wanted to include a musical track from a pop group, who do you approach / pay for permission / usage ?


I hope that this makes sense and thanks again for any advice you can give.


Best wishes.



Jonathan.






Posted 28 Jan 2014
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
This seems to answer your question:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Si4RAH3Q2zY

Posted 28 Jan 2014
SandyCamel
Photographer
SandyCamel
stolenfaces

This seems to answer your question: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Si4RAH3Q2zY




Thank you !  I have just started watching the Youtube video and it seems perfect in terms of answering my question !


Thanks once again !







Posted 28 Jan 2014
redbaron
Photographer
redbaron
That won't stop the bastards trying to claim you do not have rights and putting adverts on you Youtube videos of course. I've lost count of the times I've had to challenge them. Of course you never see any of the revenue they get from those adverts as compensation for wasting your time.



Posted 28 Jan 2014
JeromeRazoir
Photographer
JeromeRazoir
The Performing Rights Society.

Posted 28 Jan 2014
Crippen
Photographer
Crippen
A little word of warning Jonathan. Although that youtube link is a good start, I'm not entirely convinced it's tells you the whole story.

It's my understanding that you actually need two licenses here in the UK. One from the writer, publisher or license holder of the piece, the second from the recording artist. This means that even if you used something by Mozart, that is in theory is out of copyright, you may still have to compensate the orchestra who recorded the version you wish to use.

Then of course you have the potential nightmare of dealing with the artistes. It's not unheard of for bands to ask to see scripts or rough cuts of the finished film, for band approval, before any agreement can be reached.

As well as PRS (already mentioned) check out the FAQ's on the MPA (music publishers association) website.

www.mpaonline.org.uk/FAQ

Good luck
Dave
Posted 28 Jan 2014
Edited by Crippen 28 Jan 2014
BaileyK
Model
BaileyK
I regularly have my GTA videos pulled off YouTube due to the music in the cars which obviously you can't help.
I have to let them take the songs out to let them stay up.


However, I won't name the websites name but I am 100% sure they are going to get in deep doo doo for using music in their videos.. So please please make sure your sure your sure hahaha.

There are websites where you can buy the rights, for what I required once they wanted £90 Haha.
Idea went down the toilet x

Posted 28 Jan 2014
photomane9
Photographer
photomane9
You need to read up on sync (synchronisation) rights. It's a complicated area for the novice and it's worth getting to grips with the various terms which the collecting societies may quote in their licences, to make sure you only pay for the licence you need and no more. If you want to use a specific song or track, then go down the PRS for Music route as that encompasses both the PRS and MCPS sides. However if you only need some generic music to fit a particular mood or event, consider getting what is known as production music (a sort of off-the-peg music) from a specialist source such as SoundCloud, who provide a simple one-stop no-nonsense licence, and tend to be cheaper than trying to deal with either the big collecting societies or the major labels.

Addendum. As the SoundCloud website is somewhat difficult to navigate to find production music, here's a link to a specific outfit called SoundCritters and an example of one of their many tracks:  http://soundcloud.com/soundcritters/superhuman-album-mix

Also be careful about the Youtube link posted above. It refers to US copyright procedures which, in this area, are different to UK copyright law. 


Posted 28 Jan 2014
Edited by photomane9 28 Jan 2014
SandyCamel
Photographer
SandyCamel
Thank you everyone for such great advice.


It does seem to be a very complicated area - I was unsure what to put into google and you have helped lots - I have now found this, in addition to your great links,  which seems to be very helpful:



http://www.bbc.co.uk/filmnetwork/filmmaking/guide/before-you-start/music-rights




Posted 28 Jan 2014
Edited by SandyCamel 28 Jan 2014
Crippen
Photographer
Crippen
Jonathan,

How did you get on? Did you manage to purchase what you wanted? Was it expensive? Any problems clearing rights?

Dave


Posted 7 April 2014
kgp
Photographer
kgp
JeromeRazoir

The Performing Rights Society.



Thats who I pay
Posted 8 April 2014
Crippen
Photographer
Crippen
Kgp,

If you don't mind me asking, how much do you pay, and what do you use the music for? (What rights are you granted?)

Cheers
Dave
Posted 8 April 2014
Edited by Crippen 8 April 2014
OldMaster
Photographer
OldMaster
I suspect Razoir is right. It used to be the MCPS, "mechanical copyright protection society" but may be they don't exist any more!!

Of course anything over 50 years old and the original is out of copyright in the UK, different in the US where I think it is 100 years, but I guess you are thinking of using something a little more contempory!
Posted 8 April 2014
Edited by OldMaster 8 April 2014
Crippen
Photographer
Crippen
Just to clarify and reiterate...

Whatever music you use there are two licences that you need to obtain for each piece:

Publishing licence: from the people who own the copyright to the piece of music i.e. lyrics and composition.

Recording licence: from the people who performed the version of music that you want to use. For example, sound recording copyright exists in a pianist’s recording of one of Beethoven's sonatas.



Old Master
Copyright in music in the UK lasts for 70 years after the death of the composer... but don't forget the musicains, etc, also have to be dead 70 years. So you'd need a very old recording of that sonata before you could use it for free. Perhaps a 78rpm stashed away under your old gramophone.

Dave
Posted 8 April 2014
Edited by Crippen 8 April 2014
MG
Photographer
MG
I don't think anyone has mentioned this... You asked for 'Videos' which I am assuming you mean hard copies.... Your answer is in the UK MSPC - Mechanical Copyright Protection Society.

I just bought a licence for a wedding film of 25 minutes or less for around £7.00. It allows you to use any popular music on up to a certain amount of DVD's.


http://www.prsformusic.com/users/recordedmedia/cdsandvinyl/Pages/LimitedManufactureLicence(LM).aspx

Posted 8 April 2014
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