Only Strange People Like Being Photographed

Only Strange People Like Being Photographed

7 posts
17 Nov 2013
SandyCamel
Photographer
SandyCamel
Hi every-one,
                      I just saw this BBC article about the photographer 'Jason Bell' and his top 10 tips for being a photographer.


Thought it was fairly interesting so perhaps have a look ?


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-24954370


The title of this thread was taken from 'Tip No: 7' incidentally !


Thanks then.


Jonathan.





Posted 17 Nov 2013
Some very sound observations in this article !

Posted 17 Nov 2013
photo3
Photographer
photo3
Some excellent insights there.

He had the same grounding in the darkroom as me, except mine was at home and I had to clear out the room to develop stuff but it was always magical seeing an image come out of the developer tray.
Posted 17 Nov 2013
Tim
Model
Tim
Great article, a nice find and worth a read, Cheers!

Posted 18 Nov 2013
magpie1
Photographer
magpie1
Like Photo3 I started in a darkroom, encouraged by my Dad and developed my first film, B+W , aged 4, me, not the film, then contact printed it. Like most from that background the 'magic' of seeing the image appear in the tray was photographic heroin. Though now transitioned to digital, mostly, I can't imagine the same feeling coming from " command P" as seeing the image in the developer.
Obviously many, possibly most, on here might never have experienced chemical photography, so I'm interested in hearing where people first found the 'buzz' from digital photography?

Posted 18 Nov 2013
Edited by magpie1 18 Nov 2013
I used (and processed and printed) film of all kinds from 1947 till 2004. Initially wary of digital, I soon found it had many advantages. The clincher was a couple of years back - in a fit of nostalgia I rebuilt the darkroom, bought a Rolleicord, and spent some days re-living the way we used to do it......including making many of the old mistakes.

This was a very expensive exercise, and the results were so-so (interesting but not outstanding).

I then did it all again with my 5D - vastly superior results in minutes (or at most hours).

Nostalgia ain`t all it`s cracked up to be.

Posted 19 Nov 2013
Kiboko
Photographer
Kiboko
Very interesting read but I found it hard to determine what his tips actually were. I was half expecting my No.1 tip for improving every-ones photography at a stroke, (which Charlie Waite & Joe Cornish would undoubtedly advocate), - to use a tripod, - to be there somewhere, - but it wasn't mentioned and nor were other techniques I half expected. I'm not really sure there were any actual tips, - for example, be a people person is not something one can just emulate is it! Nice to read the background about this photographer though, the media didn't really tell us much about him when they reported on the Christening shoot.

Posted 19 Nov 2013
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