3D Printers

35 posts
25 Oct 2013
johnlp
Photographer
johnlp
OK, who's going to be the first on here, to buy a 3D printer and make models of models (well bits of them, obviously)?

Posted 25 Oct 2013
redbaron
Photographer
redbaron
I don't see a lot of point in that but I can foresee them becoming a stunning way to create unique accessories for shoots once the printers mature. Particularly if you can scan in a models face or other features and use that to create something made to measure.

In practise having had a play with 3D CAD in the past buying the printer is going to be the easy part however.

Posted 25 Oct 2013
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
I suspect they'll be used more for mischief like this:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-24666591


Posted 25 Oct 2013
dominicdgt
Photographer
dominicdgt
I guess if it scanned and then printed I could think of more reasons to own it, but as they stand they scream expensive to run! A conventional printer isn't exactly cheap on just inks! Maplins now sell a consumer versions at £699 and £1619 with the plastic stuff on a real at £29.99 (various colours)

They can't print an object with moving parts though can they, I don't think they can? The gun that was showcased months ago looks like a solid block of plastic still needing to be put together. An item with interlinking parts such as a chain would need the final part of the process done by hand surely separating the links out?





Posted 25 Oct 2013
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
@Dominic, you print every component separately (as you do when manufacture anything) and assemble the parts. The beauty is that you don't need moulds or complicated/expensive tooling, only the design on a file. Not only are they expensive to buy in terms of both equipment and material costs, I know the 'proper' ones have to be powered/heated 24/7 in order to keep the plastic in a liquid state otherwise it will clog up so you have silly electricity costs as well (if you don't use it much). The industrial ones are pretty good although I think this is far more impressive than these 3D printers: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnIvhlKT7SY
Posted 25 Oct 2013
Plymjack
Photographer
Plymjack
In the 80s Dot Matrix printers were all the rage (STAR 120D was £180 as I recall) In the 90s it was the inkjets the B/W HP DJ500 (£200) then the Colour models followed with photo quality In the 00s we had Lasers - Colour lasers are now a 5th of the price they were 10 years ago (about £200!).. So now for the 10s we have 3D - silly prices to begin but dhould be cheap as chips before the dacade is out! (or am I just getting old.....)
Posted 25 Oct 2013
dominicdgt
Photographer
dominicdgt
Not strictly true about when you manufacture anything, a lot of sculptured woodwork (chain as an example) would be done from a solid one piece then cut apart at the final stage to create two connecting parts, that's why I wondered if these machines could cut as part of the final finishing process, clearly not.

I guess for an obsolete item providing you could map it then get the machine to build it could be useful, it might have a very limited specialist use but the cost would be disproportionate. Looking too at the way the head stays static and the supporting base moves on the Maplin's machine you can see the actual max size on any object is extremely limited. For anyone thinking they could capture the market with replicating lady parts (slightly weird) the reality of scale might be the big let down especially with these home based models.

but i do want one!


Posted 25 Oct 2013
dominicdgt
Photographer
dominicdgt
Plymjack
In the 80s Dot Matrix printers were all the rage (STAR 120D was £180 as I recall) In the 90s it was the inkjets the B/W HP DJ500 (£200) then the Colour models followed with photo quality In the 00s we had Lasers - Colour lasers are now a 5th of the price they were 10 years ago (about £200!).. So now for the 10s we have 3D - silly prices to begin but dhould be cheap as chips before the dacade is out! (or am I just getting old.....)
The printer legacy though is to the point, cheap printers costing more to re-fill all the inks (+/-) than the cost of the printer, I can see running costs the biggest factor, if you get given one for Xmas you still face a hefty commitment if you start producing stuff and I'm guessing the learning curve might be slightly higher than expected unless there's a wealth of products to download.
Posted 25 Oct 2013
I was working on this principle in the 1980's when we were using Autocad 10 and producing laser beams into a resin tank to produce items.
One of the first unmakable item was a double cowled fan.
This was done by varing the level and depth of the point of the laser into resin and then taking the item out of the tank and curing it in a uv oven.
There are all sorts of worries at the moment as they have already found undesirables producing plastic parts for guns, that work and are undetectable by current security detection equipment. 
Posted 25 Oct 2013
Johnathons
Photographer
Johnathons
Went to Maplins in Birmingham city centre today and they had one in the shop

Posted 25 Oct 2013
gerryquiff
Photographer
gerryquiff
Johnathons

Went to Maplins in Birmingham city centre today and they had one in the shop


I think they made that one just before they sold the first one
Posted 25 Oct 2013
Ken_Smith
Photographer
Ken_Smith
dominicdgt

They can't print an object with moving parts though can they? ... An item with interlinking parts such as a chain would need the final part of the process done by hand surely separating the links out?


This replica of the "Sea Beast" on QI had at least 76 interlocking moving parts and only needed the propellor attaching...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPV1rOk84X8




Posted 25 Oct 2013
HMansfield
Photographer
HMansfield
Ken_Smith
This replica of the "Sea Beast" on QI had at least 76 interlocking moving parts and only needed the propellor attaching... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPV1rOk84X8
I want one! I'm not even sure what it is, but I want one!
Posted 25 Oct 2013
Nifty555
Photographer
Nifty555
The Sea Beast wasn't printed using a machine like the one Maplins are selling. It was done using a laser fired into a bed of plastic powder, the laser then fused the material. The non fused powder can support items that are fused higher up the profile, so a chain can be created with no finishing. But the maplins printer would have to have supports build into the design and then removed when finishing.

Posted 27 Oct 2013
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