What do photographers look for in a home shoot?

What do photographers look for in a home shoot?

27 posts
1 Aug 2013
Hi guys,

Have recently moved - again! - and am considering the option of offering home shoots again from my flat in north London. It's crazily accessible as the tube station is directly opposite my front door, bright and airy but I'm not sure what photographers would want in regards of sets or backdrops etc etc. I'm limited for space and wondering if its worth it.

Thanks

Jaye


Posted 1 Aug 2013
ScottishGeek
Photographer
ScottishGeek
I've done a couple of home shoots. What I personally look for is neutral colours, uncluttered rooms with any distractions easily moved out of the way. I also check out parking as, due to the amount of kit i drag along, travelling by public transport wouldn't really work for me. Plenty of natural light is a bonus as is the act that the model can't use the excuse that they forgot to bring something along lol.

Posted 1 Aug 2013
Edited by ScottishGeek 1 Aug 2013
atumeda
Photographer
atumeda
a tall fridge, or a broken short one

Posted 1 Aug 2013
Ah - didnt even think of parking! That's a good point there is absolutely none close to me as am on a very busy main road

Posted 1 Aug 2013
Andy_B
Photographer
Andy_B
Clean, bright, not too cluttered, no distracting backgrounds.

I can't see the point of backdrops in that context... if you want a studio look, use a studio - I like the 'lifestyle' feel of a house, and you get a more real look than a room set in a studio.

It's essential to have a fully portable studio kit if you live in a city - so public transport isn't a problem for me.

Posted 1 Aug 2013
camerawerks
Photographer
camerawerks
For me,one of the reasons for shooting at model's homes is the "lifestyle" look so studio style backdrops would be of no interest to me. Ideally, it should have the "lived in" look that most studio room sets don't replicate very well but it should be reasonably tidy and uncluttered and have several shooting options.

Like others, I need to bring some quite bulky equipment to home shoots so parking is a major issue.

Posted 2 Aug 2013
Clean, tidy, no items in the background ruining shots such as shopping bags, underwear, clothes, shoes, ironing boards etc.

I would also like a clean and tidy Kitchen and Bathroom to shoot in.



Posted 2 Aug 2013
Photoimager
Photographer
Photoimager
London and parking is quite an issue generally, also the congestion charge. The London Evening Standard of Wednesday had an article about people renting out their driveway or other spaces illegally but very lucratively.

I have taken a lighting rig ( not speedlights, 600 w/s heads ) and a Lastolite HiLight plus camera gear and backup by local public transport. I would not dream of doing so on London trains / buses. The Hilite would be too much of a problem for the other passengers. Taking a few flash heads and modifiers, no problem.

To me, if it is a home location photosession then I'd be looking for home based scenes, not a studio style background ( says th person who's lounge is a studio ! ). In which case, as others have said, clean and uncluttered with some interesting furniture / features.
Posted 2 Aug 2013
Edited by Photoimager 2 Aug 2013
Socialdisaster
Photographer
Socialdisaster
The ability to clear a space large enough to either put up a backdrop or take a decent 3/4 - full shot of the model standing.

As part of this: nice walls.

Other things: nice furniture. A good chair.

Posted 2 Aug 2013
Eyepi
Photographer
Eyepi
Personally, if I book a home shoot it's because I want the natural 'home' look.

In London there are plenty of studios so, as was mentioned, if I want to shoot that sort of thing I will book one.

It then comes down to availability of natural light and what interesting / subtle settings can be created. A plain wall and a radiator isn't much interest to me, but even an unusual-looking blanket on a sofa can be good.

Relatively clean and tidy is good too.

Parking is definitely an issue given the amount of kit you have to cart around on the tube, but it is by no means a deal-breaker for me. Plus most residents' parking areas are still free in the evening and sometimes weekends so that could be an option too.

Posted 2 Aug 2013
PeterH
Photographer
PeterH
camerawerks

For me,one of the reasons for shooting at model's homes is the "lifestyle" look so studio style backdrops would be of no interest to me. Ideally, it should have the "lived in" look that most studio room sets don't replicate very well but it should be reasonably tidy and uncluttered and have several shooting options. Like others, I need to bring some quite bulky equipment to home shoots so parking is a major issue.


+1

I'm looking for reality, but nice reality, so take down your 1 Direction posters! Please be clean, there's nothing worse than turning up to a house that looks like it hosted a student party the night before. I doesn't have to look like a show house, but I'd prefer it not to look like a squat, either.
Posted 2 Aug 2013
PeterH

but I'd prefer it not to look like a squat, either.


Oh Peter, you just don't know how to do edgy.

Posted 2 Aug 2013
PeterH
Photographer
PeterH
JadedRed

Oh Peter, you just don't know how to do edgy.



If edgy is a kitchen floor that sticks to the soles of your shoes, a cooker so greasy that you can write your name in it, and molding takeaway containers littering the living room floor, then I'll steer well clear.  

And yes, I've had all of those and more on the home shoots i've done.
Posted 2 Aug 2013
johnlp
Photographer
johnlp
It's a repeat of the above. I don't want the model to say that I can move the furniture around, to discover three years worth of dust, and worse, underneath where the sofa was. It's amazing how distracting torn wallpaper can be!

Remove family photos

If you agree to use a bedroom and/or bathroom tidy them up BEFORE the shoot and try to make it look as good as if you were trying to sell the place.

Figure out where you are getting most Natural light from and make sure that has free access.

Tell people about the parking. The last time I went into London for a shoot (apart from it taking three times as long to drive as Google suggested), it took me 20 minutes to find a parking bay, and that had a maximum of 2hr parking time, so I had to re-park half way through the shoot.


Posted 2 Aug 2013
KevinJS
Photographer
KevinJS
PeterH

If edgy is a kitchen floor that sticks to the soles of your shoes, a cooker so greasy that you can write your name in it, and molding takeaway containers littering the living room floor, then I'll steer well clear.  

And yes, I've had all of those and more on the home shoots i've done.


I think I could name that model. Though I won't LOLfrown

Posted 2 Aug 2013
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