Hayfever

21 posts
9 July 2013
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Anyone else dying a slow and painful death from it?  
Posted 9 July 2013
thestarglider
Photographer
thestarglider
Mine has been horrific for the past couple of weeks. Usually by this time of years it's easing off, but clearly because of the delayed warmer weather, it's hit later, and more concentrated than usual.

Posted 9 July 2013
Socialdisaster
Photographer
Socialdisaster
Bloody awful this year. I have found, however, that taking a tablet just as I go to bed, helps me wake up feeling much better then, about 9am I take another for the day.

Posted 9 July 2013
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
I have to take my tablet in the morning as I need the effects of it it be strong for my journey home (35 miles), taking it in the evening ends up with it being worn out by then.

Posted 9 July 2013
murphyspal
Photographer
murphyspal
Yeah its later and worse than usual. I find taking a shower before bed helps. My doc says it gets rid of any pollen that might be in your hair and body. Other than that its sunglasses and pills to keep the worst of it at bay.

Posted 9 July 2013
paulford
Photographer
paulford
Was on tablets el cheepo ones find they are usually just as good but been on nasal spray all this week, for last couple of years been really affecting my breathing as well, Almost like some fat oaf sat on my chest not fun at all, And all that snot where the hell does it come from?

Posted 11 July 2013
skymouse
Photographer
skymouse
Mine's been been mostly not too bad so far, in fact so far it's been far less servere than many previous years. It's unpredictable, though. A few times in the last week or two I've gone outside for just a matter of a minute before experiencing quite sudden and dramatic discomfort, including my body trying to violently sneeze and cough at the exact same instant!

I think it must depend on which types of pollen each person is allergic to. I normally get hayfever far earlier in the year, so I'm guessing that with the sudden change of weather I'm being just occasionally affected by small pockets of some plant that has flowered (?) later than normal, and it's maybe not the same plant as is affecting most sufferers right now.
Posted 12 July 2013
Edited by skymouse 12 July 2013
Moorlane
Photographer
Moorlane
mine has suddenly hit me badly. I just need to remember to take my non drowsy supermarket tablet early in the morning and I'm Ok

Posted 14 July 2013
LauraLily
Photographer
LauraLily
I am left wondering if it is actually possible to due from it, as this year is the worst one I've had in years!

Posted 14 July 2013
Bugsy
Photographer
Bugsy
I used to get so bad that I couldn't drive or leave the house. Tried lots of pills which worked to a greater or lesser degree. Then my neighbour suggested acupuncture. I was so bad at the time I would try anything, so I had 2 sessions and it was like a miracle cure. No tablets, no drowsiness, no loss of energy - just normal.

It was explained to me that your body has a set tolerance to allergens, bit like a cup. When the limit is reached the cup overflows and you get symptoms. Western medicine mopps up the overflowed water, whereas eastern medicine empties the cup!

So I recommend you find a good acupuncturist. One who specialises in it rather than does it as an aside to a different specialisation. If they can tell you where they'll put the needles before examining you, don't go there. I used to go 1 or 2 times each year just as I got first symptoms, and be fine for the rest of the year. I rarely suffer now, but know where to go if I do.

Posted 14 July 2013
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Bugsy
Western medicine mopps up the overflowed water, whereas eastern medicine empties the cup!
I tried Chinese medicine once for something else. Bloody expensive (~£12 a day), difficult to get (I had to get the train to London each weekend at the time), and tasted utterly vile and started making me feel quite sick. You basically fill a pan with dried leaves, twigs, seeds & mushrooms and let them boil into a thick black/brown soup that you have to drink, bloody awful.
Posted 15 July 2013
Bugsy
Photographer
Bugsy
Sorry to hear you had a bad experience with Chinese medicine. All private medicine (eastern and western) is relatively expensive compared to NHS, and you need to be careful about where you go for it. However acupuncture is now starting to be used by the NHS even though there is no "scientific" reasoning behind it's effectivness.

All I'm saying is that it worked really well for me, and for several people I have recommended it to. It will not harm you, if you relax whilst it is being done it does not hurt, and if you go with an open mind it may just relieve you of the hell that is bad hayfever.

Posted 15 July 2013
Bugsy

However acupuncture is now starting to be used by the NHS even though there is no "scientific" reasoning behind it's effectivness


Why did you put scientific in quotation marks?
Posted 15 July 2013
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
JadedRed
Why did you put scientific in quotation marks?
Perhaps because it's empirical?
Posted 15 July 2013
marksilvester
Photographer
marksilvester
Recent research in Sweden has shown a massive increase in Hay Fever sufferers.

"Swedish scientists found that between 1994 and 2009 the proportion of adults reacting to timothy grass - one of the main causes of hayfever - almost doubled from 12% to 21%."

Looks like its only going to get worse.

Posted 15 July 2013
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