Interesting article regarding 3rd party firmware

Interesting article regarding 3rd party firmware

11 posts
28 May 2013
mph
Photographer
mph
Go Canon!
Posted 28 May 2013
EdT
Photographer
EdT
Surely, what Canon says is pretty much common sense. Maybe I'm wrong but I would have thought that if one of the buttons failed or the camera failed for some reason that couldn't possibly be linked to the firmware, then you are still covered by your statutary rights under the Sale of Goods Act.

Just not sure how long the "you can expect it to remain fit for purpose" is supposed to last when compared to a fixed length warranty.

Posted 28 May 2013
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
In reality it doesn't make any difference what they say.
If it turns into a brick you're stuffed.
If it doesn't, the first thing you do when there appears to be a problem is put the original firmware back and (assuming that that doesn't fix the problem) get it fixed under warranty.

Posted 28 May 2013
mph
Photographer
mph
[qt][author]EdT[/author]
Surely, what Canon says is pretty much common sense. Maybe I'm wrong but I would have thought that if one of the buttons failed or the camera failed for some reason that couldn't possibly be linked to the firmware, then you are still covered by your statutory rights under the Sale of Goods Act. Just not sure how long the "you can expect it to remain fit for purpose" is supposed to last when compared to a fixed length warranty.[/qt]

Yes - but those statutory rights are against the retailer whereas a guarantee from the manufacturer is quite different.



Posted 28 May 2013
mph
Photographer
mph
stolenfaces

In reality it doesn't make any difference what they say. If it turns into a brick you're stuffed. If it doesn't, the first thing you do when there appears to be a problem is put the original firmware back and (assuming that that doesn't fix the problem) get it fixed under warranty.


Unless the "brick" won't turn on!

Posted 28 May 2013
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
mph

Unless the "brick" won't turn on!



There's always the chance that they can detect if the firmware has been reflashed also.
Posted 28 May 2013
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
mph
Unless the "brick" won't turn on!
??? As I said 'If it turns into a brick you're stuffed.'
Posted 28 May 2013
Edited by stolenfaces 28 May 2013
mph
Photographer
mph
stolenfaces

??? As I said 'If it turns into a brick you're stuffed.'

Oops!

Posted 28 May 2013
anthonyh
Photographer
anthonyh
My understanding from a lot of discussions on Yank web sites is that ML merely runs a secondary program in a Canon...so in effect it is like running Word on a PC....log out of Word ( or uninstall it) and it makes no difference to the Windows OS.

It also seems to be the case that the manufacturer has to demonstrate that a fault is down to 3rd party software before they can disclaim responsibility...not do so merely because 3rd party software is detected. The problem of course is that if a manufacturer claims it is the software, the customer has to get expert evidence to demonstrate it is not.

In the UK, for retail customers, responsibility for defective items is 100% with the retailer.....and the Sale of Goods Act isn't 'limited' to a 12 month period. A manufacturer's or retailer's guarantee may promise additional benefits for a limited time (usually 12 months).....but can't promise less than the Act provides or limit the period that the Act covers...which can be up to six years in some circumstances.

Posted 28 May 2013
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
anthonyh

My understanding from a lot of discussions on Yank web sites is that ML merely runs a secondary program in a Canon...so in effect it is like running Word on a PC....log out of Word ( or uninstall it) and it makes no difference to the Windows OS. It also seems to be the case that the manufacturer has to demonstrate that a fault is down to 3rd party software before they can disclaim responsibility...not do so merely because 3rd party software is detected. The problem of course is that if a manufacturer claims it is the software, the customer has to get expert evidence to demonstrate it is not. In the UK, for retail customers, responsibility for defective items is 100% with the retailer.....and the Sale of Goods Act isn't 'limited' to a 12 month period. A manufacturer's or retailer's guarantee may promise additional benefits for a limited time (usually 12 months).....but can't promise less than the Act provides or limit the period that the Act covers...which can be up to six years in some circumstances.


I understood a slight firmware modification is still required in order to 'boot' off of the memory card.  To me that still implies that you're tampering with the camera's firmware (it doesn't matter whether or not it's in whole or in part)
Posted 28 May 2013
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