Street Photography

Street Photography

38 posts
1 April 2013
stefanschiefer
Photographer
stefanschief..
I know this might be a little off topic but I have recently started to get into Street Photography (http://500px.com/stefanschiefer) and was just seeking advice from others At the moment I'm finding it very hard to take photos of random people. How do you pluck up the courage to do it? I was in London over the weekend and was told to p*ss off etc more times than enough haha. Does anyone have any advice or interesting stories? Cheers Stefan
Posted 1 April 2013
Sacredo
Photographer
Sacredo
I'm not doing street photography per se, but I am working a lot outdoors in London at the moment. The security guards make me grin ... I see them coming ... know exactly how the conversation will go, and like seeing their reaction when I explain the way things are Most of them are actually very polite and friendly, and I often end up chatting and telling them what I'm doing - but only after they acknowledge that it's none of their business. I think 'pissing people off' might not lead to the best photos, but who knows? A project on confrontation perhaps? Be quick, discreet, move ...the good old hyperfocal technique... Look at the work of HCB and weep ... I was in Stockholm last week - there's a big exhibition of his work (I'd go and see that if it's touring) - He had a beautiful, deft touch - very remarkable work.
Posted 1 April 2013
BenwellHopper
Photographer
BenwellHoppe..
Look like you belong on the street and dont try to take sneaky shots...Its a knack and takes practice not for the timid....

Posted 1 April 2013
anthonyh
Photographer
anthonyh
The general rule seems to be to 'look' past the person at something happening behind / beside them......both before and after the photo. And be quick...you should have the shot framed in your head before pointing the camera. In some situations it might be quite 'busy' so anything goes. Or try smiling and then take a photo. Personally...I don't think street photography is for shy photographers.
Posted 1 April 2013
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
anthonyh

The general rule seems to be to 'look' past the person at something happening behind / beside them......both before and after the photo. And be quick...you should have the shot framed in your head before pointing the camera.


That's pretty much how Joel Meyerowitz shoots.  There was a six part BBC documentary called The History of Photography (or something like that, it's available on DVD) and you see him putting his technique to good use in part of it.
Posted 1 April 2013
Celt
Photographer
Celt
Have a look at the work of Jay Maisel. There are some videos about of him at work.It does require a certain frame of mind. Also, the RPS has a great little credit card sized legal advice card which is worth carrying. The most difficult part is establishing which parts of our high streets are actually private property - and security does have a right to move you on.


Posted 2 April 2013
Hugh
Photographer
Hugh
Have a look here... valuable resource. http://www.flickr.com/groups/100strangers/

Me- 35mm prime lens, get close, shoot quickly, smile and say thankyou.

Not carrying lots of extra crap helps. No bag, no zoom lens.

Posted 2 April 2013
Fluffypup
Photographer
Fluffypup
Zone focus if you can with a wide angle and get in close - people are less intimidated if you are closer to them rather than at a distance taking 'sneaky' shots - plus your photos will be far better. Fumble with your camera as well - Winogrand uses this technique and it does work.

Posted 2 April 2013
JeromeRazoir
Photographer
JeromeRazoir
Wide enough lens and you can stand beside your subject and they think you are photographing behind them.
Carry two cameras. A huge big one on a neck strap and a little one that you take the photographs with tucked in your hand. Once upon a time you could convince people it was your light meter. No one knows what one those is these days!

Posted 2 April 2013
shapeman
Photographer
shapeman
I mainly shoot Street Photography I tend to do grab shots, I use a 5D mk2 with various Lenses however normally a 50mm, always carry a Business card this has help me several times.

You do have to be a bit cheeky, quick, and have an idea what you want few is more.

Paul

Posted 2 April 2013
anthonyh
Photographer
anthonyh
Just thought...a swivel screen and zone focusing might help as well. I remember years ago reading that TLRs were good for street photography as one was looking down and it was hard to see where the photographer was pointing the camera when taking the shot..so basically a modern version of this.

I also had a little set up a couple of years back that worked 'ok'...I bought a radio shutter control for my G10 ( about £12 from HK) and had the camera on my chest via the neck strap so it was pointing, usually, straight ahead of me.So quite a normal 'look'.

The control was in my pocket, so I just walked around with both hands in my pocket taking pics.
There were some pretty wild compositions but in a funny way it led to an interesting set of images.Most were ok.

I didn't persevere however....I am reasonably ok about being a bit blatant when taking pics of people.I was after a set up to photograph in places that discouraged photography.
Posted 3 April 2013
Edited by anthonyh 3 April 2013
JeromeRazoir
Photographer
JeromeRazoir
Further to the swivel screen, you used to be able to get a gizmo that attached to the front of the lens via the filter thread that made the lens look like a telephoto. It worked like a periscope and you actually shot via a mirror inside at 45 degrees, through a hole in the side. So you stood next to your subject and pointed the camera at something 90 degrees off them. Did mean that you often looked a pratt, shooting a brick wall when there was something more interesting next to you!
There might be something similar around these days. I have one but I am buggered if I know where it is.

Posted 3 April 2013
BenwellHopper
Photographer
BenwellHoppe..
I like using 5x4 for street, its abit expensive to run but the results are fantastic...TLRs are great (cheaper running costs) as the genral public arnt use to them.. Though you get average street shots with em....

Posted 3 April 2013
mph
Photographer
mph
[qt][author]BenwellHopper[/author] I like using 5x4 for street, its a bit expensive to run but the results are fantastic...TLRs are great (cheaper running costs) as the general public arnt use to them.[/qt] And so inconspicuous too!
Posted 3 April 2013
corbystock
Photographer
corbystock
just wear a high viz vest & tell people the cctv is down & you've been sent out to take photos
Posted 4 April 2013
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