invoicing a charity

invoicing a charity

20 posts
9 Dec 2012
CBavage
Make Up Artist
CBavage
Trying to gauge if im about to do the right thing... some advice from other MUAs (especially the ones who do this as a full time job or regularly paid) would be very much appreciated.

Im a BTEC qualified MUA - but its not my full time job. I was asked by a former employer (a large charity) to do a make up job for them very last minute. I agreed and was able to agree time off from my day job to do it. I was then asked to repeat this last week and again managed to agree this with my boss. When I arrived I was told they were happy to pay my expenses etc and i should give them an invoice.

I have now been asked to do a third shoot - again short notice (tomorrow) and have again agreed some time off work to do it.

As its a charity i was initially happy to do it for the experience - but covering my expenses would be hugely helpful. I also dont want to charge stupid amounts and do myself out of future work because its very high profile. My day job is temp work - so all the time away is unpaid - theres no annual leave i can use up - but my boss is really flexible and lets me make up the hours.

Am i wrong to consider just charging a one day travel card plus £5 or £10 for make up per session?

Is there a protocol or best practice for invoicing charities etc? I'd really appreciate some advice or opinions. I dont want to sell myself short, its been hard, and interesting work. But dont want to be taking the mickey.

Posted 9 Dec 2012
ClaireShipman
Make Up Artist
ClaireShipma..
Charity or not theres only so much you can do for free at a high cost to yourself in travel and supplies, generally I feel they are taking advantage of you and will continue to do so whilst they can get people for free. I would politely give them a call and suggest you were promised expenses and as you have not yet received them you just simply cant afford to do the job in this current climate but if they could arrange expenses and a contribution towards your work you would be happy to continue, say that you undertook the job out of the kindness of your heart and for the experience of working with a wonderful charity but you can no longer justify the travelling etc. On the otherhand you could just invoice what you feel you are owed and wait for them to either kick up a stink or just pay it. You suggest they are a large charity, large charities pay there staff large ammounts of money and give little to the charity they support, im positive the person that probably books you is on a wage, so why shouldnt you be? I really hope this is not to harsh, I do a fair bit of my own charity work but I recently worked with a huge charity and I was paid very well for this so on some occasions its only fair. Good luck
Posted 9 Dec 2012
paule
Photographer
paule
Many charities are very worthy, and I like to think most are decent... however, just remember not all are scraping the barrel..

Many execs are on top ££, are they working for expenses being covered... no, so why should you?

3rd time is starting to take the whatever...  I think its about time you were paid, not just having expenses covered... 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2012/apr/24/top-1000-charities-donations-britain



as for invoice, google invoice templates or create one yourself: name, address, client details, description of work & your bank account details for money to be paid, use the date of the job as a reference and as them to use that when making payment.
Posted 9 Dec 2012
If they agreed to pay your expenses, they should pay your expenses. I wouldn't hesitate to invoice for expenses (travel and kit?), particularly as it's all been so short notice and you've had to take time off your actual job.

Yes, they're a charity, and that's why they're not paying you a full fee, but it sounds like you don't have loads of spare cash sloshing around; there's no reason you should make a loss on the day.

Posted 9 Dec 2012
MikeNaylor
Photographer
MikeNaylor
CBavage

I also dont want to charge stupid amounts and do myself out of future work because its very high profile. .


To put things into perspective, obviously you didnt mention a specific charity but here are a few figures from a very high profile charity:

BARNARDO'S

Number of staff: 7,085

Total spent on wages: £115,873,000.00

Average staff pay: £16,354.69

So don't feel obliged to work for free 7,085 people certainly don't!

A strange but true story is that I know the person who shoots cheque presentations to the YMCA, these cheques usually amount to a few hundred pounds, the YMCA pays him £125 to take photos of the presentation!!!

Posted 9 Dec 2012
Edited by MikeNaylor 9 Dec 2012
I have to be honest here, I've been involved in a number of charities and none of them have been "skint".
The paid employees earned above average for their roles and the volunteers were the ones doing all the work.
If you do it time and time again for them then they expect it for free, they will have some sort of budget for you but if they are getting it much lower then ofcourse they will happily take it especially if its a bigger organisation.

One of the charities I first volunteered for were a small charity but they have more money coming in than one would think from various funds - poor they were not. The "passion" felt by the top dogs was nothing more than them making sure their lack of work for good pay would continue but they would have no qualms about making others feel guilty for not working for the cause.

Posted 9 Dec 2012
CBavage
Make Up Artist
CBavage
Thanks for the advice everyone, it all rings true, and is a healthy reminder of whats reasonable. Iv'e put together an invoice I am happy with, will submit it in the morning and see what happens I suppose. Worst that happens is they disagree with what i ask for (which is a completely sensible amount i think) (The charity isn't Barnados or YMCA )
Posted 9 Dec 2012
MikeNaylor
Photographer
MikeNaylor
CBavage

 (The charity isn't Barnados or YMCA )


I wasn't sugesting they were and I wouldn't want you to name names lol, your invoice should be paid no problem.

Posted 9 Dec 2012
JeromeRazoir
Photographer
JeromeRazoir
I bet they pay their electricity bill and their stationery bill etc. Do not be black-mailed into working for free. Why should you?

Posted 9 Dec 2012
LaurenceJPower
Photographer
LaurenceJPow..
Finally, a thought, if you charged them the correct rate for the job, you could then donate the money back to them and claim "gift aid" thus they would benefit from the tax in addition.

Posted 10 Dec 2012
MikeNaylor
Photographer
MikeNaylor
LaurenceJPower

Finally, a thought, if you charged them the correct rate for the job, you could then donate the money back to them and claim "gift aid" thus they would benefit from the tax in addition.


Why should she donate the money back to the charity, she is doing a job she should be paid accordingly, a charity is a business just like any other!
Posted 10 Dec 2012
LaurenceJPower
Photographer
LaurenceJPow..
The choice is entirely hers, you will note that I used the word "could". What she could do is charge har normal fee plus expenses, then donate whatever she wanted back to the charity, allowing them to get the benefit of basic rate tax.

Posted 10 Dec 2012
Spike
Photographer
Spike
A good policy on working for freecan be found here http://shouldiworkforfree.com/

As has been said a lot of the larger charitees are very well off & pay ther employees fairly well, others are not so lucky.

My personal view is there are a couple of small charitees I actively support for personal reasons & I do their PR photography for free - they both offer to pay my expenses but I choose not to take them.

When other charitees have approached me I  quote the job at normal rates - some pay, others give me  the " we're a charittee can't you do it for free" to which I reply with the question does the person booking me work for free - in every case they have been salaried employees so I simply suggest when they work for free I will. smiley
Posted 10 Dec 2012
extra_mayo
Photographer
extra_mayo
There's only 1 word you need to absorb here.

"

exploitation

"

(selfish utilization)



Ian
Posted 10 Dec 2012
David_Liddell
Photographer
David_Liddel..
All charities should have a policy document that states how they handle receipted / agreed out of pocket expenses. Obtain a copy of their policy and follow it.

Anything over and above receipted / agreed out of pocket expenses on a regular basis could be viewed as a wage and an implied contract of employment. Charities are very reluctant to pay any sums that could be construed as wages.
It is important to the charity that it is seen to ‘pay their way’ especially when it comes to volunteers who are the life blood of any charity.

Do not feel guilty about claiming genuine expenses. Don’t fall for the social pressure of donating the funds back to the charity. That can cause the charity peer pressure problems and the loss of dedicated volunteers who simply can not afford to do the same.

In short, get their policy document and follow it. Claim genuine receipted / agreed out of pocket expenses. It your money keep it.

Best regards
David


Posted 10 Dec 2012
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