Road Travel to be More Expensive?

Road Travel to be More Expensive?

26 posts
29 Oct 2012
JeromeRazoir
Photographer
JeromeRazoir
My guess is that his will go the way of so many other bloody stupid ideas this government has come up with and then ditched. It sounds unworkable, in practice.

There is certainly a serious issue with the current unfairness. If you live in a big city you may well not need a car at all. If you live in the country, like me, it is impossible to do my job if I do not have a car. Public transport just does not exist that covers my hours of attendance.

PERHAPS, the way forward is to introduce tolls, like the French system. That would have the added advantage that foreign vehicles, who currently get away with paying nothing to use our roads, would have to pay their share. Like I do when I go to France.

Posted 29 Oct 2012
andy_h
Photographer
andy_h
Fine with that. Remove the duty on fuel and I'm in.

Posted 29 Oct 2012
couchpotato
Photographer
couchpotato
Another pot brained idea that will not get off the ground. Remember a few years back they where going to fit a little black box to your car so that you could be tracked at all times and pay a higher tax at peak times, what ever happened to that. All pie in the sky.
Put road tax on the fuel say a penny a ltr then those who do very high mileage pay more simple.....

Posted 29 Oct 2012
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
At the very least they need to increase minimum road tax, it sickens me that just because someone has a so-called low emissions car they can use the roads for free (or next to nothing). There's also the disparity with big cars as well. For a number of years now my cars (2.0-2.7L engines) have been at the top-end of the tax brackets which is (IMO) somewhat unfair when there's hundreds of far bigger/heavier gas-guzzling executive cars/4x4s clogging up the roads on my commute (I drive through Oxford so there's no end of wealth). And overall driving is basically far too cheap IMO. It should always be more expensive than public transport due to the priviledge of having the freedom to drive, not the other way around. It was suggested that we follow something like Portugal's example and you pay your road tax upfront with the car (they charge ~100%, so for a €10,000 car you end up paying €20,000), although obviously the drawback is that our car production industries would probably collapse as people would stop buying new cars.
Posted 30 Oct 2012
DorsetHammer
Photographer
DorsetHammer
couchpotato

Another pot brained idea that will not get off the ground. Remember a few years back they where going to fit a little black box to your car so that you could be tracked at all times and pay a higher tax at peak times, what ever happened to that. .....


Telematics has been around for years it's currently in vogue for young drivers because the data can help drive down insurance premiums. GM cars have the technology fitted as standard (including Vauxhall), Peuegot have EDR and V W, Seat and Skoda offer equivalent technology as an option, Volvo has a system fitted to its lorries which can be adapted to cars. The technology exists but the political will to have 'big brother' watching your every driving move doesn't.  
Posted 30 Oct 2012
TMG
Photographer
TMG

Difficult to avoid both motorways and A roads, surely - no matter where you live and what your commute. What would happen to those who avoid those roads throughout the year and then need to head off down the M5 or M4 to go on holiday? Or who need to collect someone from an airport?
I suspect the authors of the plan anticipate either few people taking up the low rate, or extra income from fines (or "upgrades") when they have an unavoidable need to use the main routes.

There does seem to be a real fetish for monitoring, measuring and controlling through punishment among our policy makers. I'm not au fait with this world, but do they have a corner of Fetlife to themselves?

Posted 30 Oct 2012
orsoncarter
Photographer
orsoncarter
RedChecker

...There's also the disparity with big cars as well. For a number of years now my cars (2.0-2.7L engines) have been at the top-end of the tax brackets which is (IMO) somewhat unfair when there's hundreds of far bigger/heavier gas-guzzling executive cars/4x4s clogging up the roads on my commute...

...It should always be more expensive than public transport due to the priviledge of having the freedom to drive...


The first of those points...  Agreed, but for a different reason. If someone can afford a big car and can afford to run it, the extra couple of hundred quid (or whatever it is) a year is going to make sod all difference to them. It's not going to deter them from running a large car.  (Must point out... That it not a swipe at owners of big cars. I've got an MPV.)

The second of those points... Fine if you live in an urban area, but crap if you live out in the sticks. In this village we do have a bus service, but it's just two each way per day. If anyone wanted to get to work in the nearest big city (Bath) by bus, you'd have to use two buses, your journey would take about two hours (for 15 miles), and you wouldn't be able to get there until about 9.30am!  Living in small country villages, driving is not a privilege. It's a necessity. 
Posted 30 Oct 2012
Edited by orsoncarter 30 Oct 2012
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
orsoncarter

The second of those points... Fine if you live in an urban area, but crap if you live out in the sticks. In this village we do have a bus service, but it's just two each way per day. If anyone wanted to get to work in the nearest big city (Bath) by bus, you'd have to use two buses, your journey would take about two hours (for 15 miles), and you wouldn't be able to get there until about 9.30am!  Living in small country villages, driving is not a privilege. It's a necessity. 


The thing is... I live in an urban area of sorts, or at least right next to a commuter station and it costs ~£6 per return ticket to pop into the local town (~2.5 miles) - my car really shouldn't cost less than that and if cars did get rediculously more expensive, good public transport would (hopefully) thrive again.
Posted 30 Oct 2012
DJ200
Photographer
DJ200
Are you saying that you find it perfectly acceptable to pay £6 to travel just 5 miles?

Posted 30 Oct 2012
Edited by DJ200 30 Oct 2012
Redchecker - Thats all well and good for you lot living where there is public transport, what about those that live in the middle of nowhere where there is no such thing as public transport. If you think cars should cost more than £6 pound for 5 miles - my parents live a 40mile round trip to their nearest shop as do plenty of others, just wouldnt work, would be back to horse and cart!

As for the motorway thing it sounds ridiculous to me, I would think the more sensible thing to do would be introduce another driving test specifically for motorways, so at least it would perhaps weed out those incompetant motorway drivers.
Hopefully it wont come about. The idea of moving country is getting more and more appealing.

Posted 30 Oct 2012
tonycsm
Photographer
tonycsm
Personally speaking, as a motorist, I think we already pay enough in taxes without being burdened with yet more!

If motoring taxes raised over the past 5 decades had actually been spent on our road/transport intrastructure system, then I'd have no objection to tax increases now if it was needed - however, spending figures over that period only appear to have been around 15-20% at most with the vast majority of the tax receipts disappearing into the black hole that is goverment spending, leaving our road system very poorly maintained and crying out for investment to match 21st century needs.

I'm quite sympathetic to the current government's deficit reduction policies but to expect the average motorist to pay yet more out in taxes to use the very road system we've already paid for, seems a step too far.
I live in a rural area where the nearest motorway is approximately 30 miles away with the nearest city over twenty miles. Many of the villages, including some on the few A class roads in the area, don't even have a bus service or if they do, it's one bus per day or even one per week so a car is certainly not a luxury for those who reside in rural areas. Rail lines are even fewer and far between in most rural locations.

Around 10 million people in the UK live in what can be described as a rural location - if a vehicle becomes unaffordable due to over-taxation, a hell of a lot of those people would simply be unable to travel to work or travel to work due to lack of public transport infrastructure let alone go about the rest of their daily life so, far from benefitting the country, higher taxation of the rural motorist would increase unemployment and demand migration to already over-populated cities/urban areas with existing housing shortages. Again, with fewer people in the rural areas, there would be fewer people to farm the land which would in turn would push up the prices of staple foods grown on the land!

The average rural wages are generally lower than in cities etc so those who live in the rural areas already pay a disproportionate amount for their transport which they have to provide for themselves out of necessity due to successive governments failing to invest in rural transport infrastructure - increased motor taxation would simply make living in a rural location almost impossible for many and any taxation revenue benefits would be short lived!

Posted 30 Oct 2012
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Bella0012

Redchecker - Thats all well and good for you lot living where there is public transport, what about those that live in the middle of nowhere where there is no such thing as public transport. If you think cars should cost more than £6 pound for 5 miles - my parents live a 40mile round trip to their nearest shop as do plenty of others, just wouldnt work, would be back to horse and cart!


People will have to change their habits (do more and less often) but it is my honest opinion that car ownership is far too cheap considering its impact on the environment and resources needed to keep the road networks up and running.  My point also being that I live where there is good public transport and the car is SO much cheaper to use.

And for the record I drive around 400+ miles a week, and I own a car and two motorbikes on an average wage so I would indeed be hit by any further taxes.
Posted 30 Oct 2012
DJ200
Photographer
DJ200
But don't you think that if motoring costs were to rise above those of public transport, per mile, then public transport costs would also rise. As long as the cost of the public transport, per mile, was lower than car use, it would be seen as acceptable...and so the rip-off would be perpetuated. Simple economic greed would step in as usual.

Also, if your daily work involved travelling to work, how would your more but less often hypothosis work?
Posted 30 Oct 2012
Edited by DJ200 30 Oct 2012
RedChecker
People will have to change their habits (do more and less often)
I shall tell my parents not to work so often then! Seriously, I have just moved to a city - the main reason was living too far away from a town, I was using probably about half my salary just to get to work, so coming home with next to nothing. In my opinion living here in the city is crap in comparison to where I used to live, but if I want to get rich I have no choice. But if the price of travel keeps increasing people living in the country will be force to moved to cities too and lead a poorer quality of life. So much for a free country! Perhaps they should consider lowering the price of public transport, quite honestly I think paying £5 to be crammed onto a train with a load of smelly people is a total rip off.
Posted 30 Oct 2012
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