movies to PC tablet.

movies to PC tablet.

32 posts
28 Oct 2012
photo_phil
Photographer
photo_phil
Hi
I've bought a PC tablet for my daughter for Christmas and I'd like to put a few films on it for her.
I have no idea how I get them onto my PC so I can put them on to her tablet.

Please advise.



Posted 28 Oct 2012
andy_h
Photographer
andy_h
Film type...DVD?
Tablet type...?iPad/Playbook/Android?
PC...Windows?

The basic way of doing it is to rip the film to your computer, then from their either re-encode to what format the tablet likes, or find a converter that will let you put them on the tablet

Posted 28 Oct 2012
photo_phil
Photographer
photo_phil
DVD
Android
Windows 7

I have no idea how to rip a DVD on to my PC or encode it to put on the Tablet.

Posted 28 Oct 2012
TheShinyOne
Photographer
TheShinyOne
Handbrake will do this on a mac, don't know if there is a version for PC or not ?

Posted 28 Oct 2012
andy_h
Photographer
andy_h
photo_phil

DVD Android Windows 7 I have no idea how to rip a DVD on to my PC or encode it to put on the Tablet.


If you want to pay for something

http://www.nero.com/enu/products/nero12/transfer-music-pictures-files-from-pc-to-iphone-ipod-ipad-samsung-android-phone.php
Posted 28 Oct 2012
modjo30
Photographer
modjo30
http://www.top5freeware.com/top-5-free-dvd-ripper-software

Windows version of Handbreak is on there too
Posted 28 Oct 2012
Edited by modjo30 28 Oct 2012
photo_phil
Photographer
photo_phil
Thanks guys. I'll go and take a look.

Posted 28 Oct 2012
abzphoto
Photographer
abzphoto
Commercial movies on DVD (if not pirated) are copyright protected and most 'official' software packages (e.g. Nero, Handbrake etc) will not let you rip them. If you want to do this for free, you can use a two step process - something like DVDFab to rip and then Handbrake or Super Media Converter to convert. If you want to pay, you can buy an upgraded version of the likes of DVDFab that will do both steps in one. There are a huge number of options really and half an hour in Google will help you find the best one for your exact circumstances.

Posted 29 Oct 2012
OffKeyPhotography
Photographer
OffKeyPhotography
Wonder share 43.99 rip all dvd and you can turn it into whatever file you like.


Posted 29 Oct 2012
Keltica
Photographer
Keltica
Copying (ripping) a DVD is illegal, in fact it's piracy just like if someone took one of your images and put it on their own website.

I have recently purchased a Galaxy Tab but then I have the capability to output my own video footage as 1280x720 which looks very good on the device.

I'm not entirely sure but doesnt someone make available films for output on a Tablet, although you would have to pay for that.

Posted 29 Oct 2012
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Keltica

Copying (ripping) a DVD is illegal, in fact it's piracy just like if someone took one of your images and put it on their own website.


While it is illegal what you describe isn't the same, putting it on a website is making it available to others wheras transferring a movie you have paid for to your own personal device isn't making it available to anyone else.
Posted 29 Oct 2012
alexcrawford
Photographer
alexcrawford

yes personal use is legal (ive been told one copy, but hey, i'm not sure of the numbers of copies that are legal)

Posted 29 Oct 2012
photo_phil
Photographer
photo_phil
Surely it isn't illegal if I'm making a copy of a film I legally own?
It's no different to adding music to an iPod or a music library on a PC.

Posted 29 Oct 2012
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
photo_phil

Surely it isn't illegal if I'm making a copy of a film I legally own?


Just because you own something, it does not give you a legal right to do as you please with it.

The licence terms on your discs/digital downloads/tapes or whatever will clearly state this and by using the product you agree to those terms.


There was talk of legalising a 'fair use' policy for DVD/CD ripping but I'm not sure it's been given the green light yet.
Posted 29 Oct 2012
PeterH
Photographer
PeterH
photo_phil

Surely it isn't illegal if I'm making a copy of a film I legally own? It's no different to adding music to an iPod or a music library on a PC.


You'll probably find the terms and conditions you clicked through (we all do!) say that you're buying a licence to use, rather than actually owning it. Indeed, Kindle/Amazon have recently remote wiped a womans Kindle reader of all her purchases after closing her account in a dispute.

From T&C's  "Kindle Content is licensed, not sold, to you by the Content Provider."

My understanding is that format shifting for personal use is tollerated, if not actually legal.
Posted 29 Oct 2012
To reply to this thread you must be a member. Click here to join