Mirena coil

35 posts
31 Aug 2011
Hello all. I'm hoping there are a few ladies with experience of being on the Mirena coil. I've had mine in for three years now, after needing it to be fitted to 'cure' my anaemia which was at a dangerous level. I am now no longer anaemic and a little sick of the various side-effects I've been suffering over the past year from being on the Mirena. Bad skin, and painful cramps being two such examples. It stopped my periods for over two years and I had very minor issues, but this past year it seems to not be working very well. So I have an appointment tomorrow to speak to my GP about having it removed. I just wonder if anyone has personal knowledge on whether or not the removal procedure is painful - I was having an operation when I had it fitted, so I wasn't conscious and I've read that the fitting can be quite painful. Also, I don't want to go back on to the Pill, I tried three different types of that over the years and didn't like any of the side-effects that came along with them. Does anyone know of another contraceptive option that may be good for me? Or something they've had a good experience with? My best friend has always recommended the jab to me, but when I spoke to a nurse about it she painted a horrifying picture which really put me off. So any educated advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance. Dee x
Posted 31 Aug 2011
Copper Iud? It's non hormonal.

Yes it hurts.

Posted 31 Aug 2011
beauvoir
Copper Iud? It's non hormonal. Yes it hurts.
Thanks. I looked into IUD's and they make your periods heavier, so I wouldn't want to get one of those. And my GP advised against it with my history of anaemia. The Mirena is an IUS, which does the opposite. I prefer having no periods, but I don't think there is another contraceptive method that will ensure that. Really looking forward to having it removed now. *Crosses legs*
Posted 31 Aug 2011
PUNKuate
Photographer
PUNKuate
I've been on the implant (implanon) for about 5 years now, and its great not even having to think about it. I don't get periods either, which is a bonus.



Posted 31 Aug 2011
PUNKuate
I've been on the implant (implanon) for about 5 years now, and its great not even having to think about it. I don't get periods either, which is a bonus.
Thanks I'll have a wee look for information on that online, and speak to my GP about it too. It's like you say, being on something that you don't have to think about it or notice any bad effects from.
Posted 31 Aug 2011
Anything with hormones in is changing the chemical balance in your body and you can have no way of knowing what the effects of that will be.  What works for one person may not work for you.  Hormonal contraception can have horrific side effects ranging from non-stop periods to weight gain to loss of sex drive to severe depression and many many more and worse.  The nasty thing is that once they're in your system they can linger.  So if you decide to try one method because your friend has no problems with it and three months down the line you realise you've put on two stone and you're near suicidal, you then have to wait until what's left of it in your system is broken down.  If it's an implant you can have it removed, if it's a pill you can stop taking it - but there will still be residual effects which can last an awfully long time.

Basically, if you choose to try a hormonal method, you're taking a huge gamble.  Yes it might be the best thing that ever happened to you - but equally it might be the worst decision you ever made.  The risks are there and it's your own choice - but after having had some truly terrible experiences on various pills and the injection to control my endo, I advocate hormone free every time.  I really don't see what's wrong with barrier methods.  Yes it's more convenient not to have a period, but that's what your body is meant to do, and unless your periods are debilitating (which I can relate to, as mine used to be and sometimes still are) then that's simply no excuse to pump yourself full of chemicals whose effect you can't predict




Posted 31 Aug 2011
Fleur_du_Mal
Anything with hormones in is changing the chemical balance in your body and you can have no way of knowing what the effects of that will be.  What works for one person may not work for you.  Hormonal contraception can have horrific side effects ranging from non-stop periods to weight gain to loss of sex drive to severe depression and many many more and worse.  The nasty thing is that once they're in your system they can linger.  So if you decide to try one method because your friend has no problems with it and three months down the line you realise you've put on two stone and you're near suicidal, you then have to wait until what's left of it in your system is broken down.  If it's an implant you can have it removed, if it's a pill you can stop taking it - but there will still be residual effects which can last an awfully long time. Basically, if you choose to try a hormonal method, you're taking a huge gamble.  Yes it might be the best thing that ever happened to you - but equally it might be the worst decision you ever made.  The risks are there and it's your own choice - but after having had some truly terrible experiences on various pills and the injection to control my endo, I advocate hormone free every time.  I really don't see what's wrong with barrier methods.  Yes it's more convenient not to have a period, but that's what your body is meant to do, and unless your periods are debilitating (which I can relate to, as mine used to be and sometimes still are) then that's simply no excuse to pump yourself full of chemicals whose effect you can't predict
I wasn't suggesting that I would choose another method purely based on someone's good experience of it. I've tried three different types of the pill and had awful experiences and so I came off contraceptives completely and relied on condoms for when I was in a relationship. Unfortunately I suffer from extremely heavy periods and so I had to then look at a method of controlling that. That's when I was hospitalised with severe anaemia and the Doctor recommended that I have the Mirena fitted. It stopped the excessively long and heavy bleeding, made me put on weight (I was underweight so this was needed) and it also covered my contraceptive needs. I am no longer anaemic and now the Mirena seems to be having an adverse effect on me, you can only have it in for 5 years so I would need to have it removed in two years time anyway. I've spent the last three months trying to look into what I could use instead when I have it removed. I'm in a relationship and as I mentioned earlier, I suffer from awful periods so going completely without is not an option for me. I am merely seeking out some advice from women who have actually used the same contraceptive as myself. As you said, the hormonal methods carry more risk than the non-hormonal one I use at the moment. And I've had shit experiences with hormonal one's before. The reality is I need to choose a new contraceptive and I'm just trying to weigh up the risks with information from women who have true experiences of different kinds.
Posted 31 Aug 2011
DialADaisy

The reality is I need to choose a new contraceptive and I'm just trying to weigh up the risks with information from women who have true experiences of different kinds.


I have true experiences of different kinds.  The reality, unfortunately, is that you can't guarantee that any particular type will help control your periods.  There is a high likelihood that a method like the injection will stop your periods completely ... but then there is also a risk that it will give you a three month long period.  You'll not know for sure until you try it.

Have you looked into non-hormonal methods of controlling the periods?  Tranexamic acid, for instance?  I was on that for a year or so before my endo op and let me tell you, it was genius stuff!  It lessens bleeding and is used after surgery, but it's also used to control heavy periods.  And it works.  It works really well.  Mefenamic acid is good for pain as well, but I can't take that because it brings me out in hives >_<  But the tranexamic is definitely worth a go before trying a different type of hormonal method







Posted 31 Aug 2011
Fleur_du_Mal
I have true experiences of different kinds.  The reality, unfortunately, is that you can't guarantee that any particular type will help control your periods.  There is a high likelihood that a method like the injection will stop your periods completely ... but then there is also a risk that it will give you a three month long period.  You'll not know for sure until you try it. Have you looked into non-hormonal methods of controlling the periods?  Tranexamic acid, for instance?  I was on that for a year or so before my endo op and let me tell you, it was genius stuff!  It lessens bleeding and is used after surgery, but it's also used to control heavy periods.  And it works.  It works really well.  Mefenamic acid is good for pain as well, but I can't take that because it brings me out in hives >_<  But the tranexamic is definitely worth a go before trying a different type of hormonal method
I haven't heard of those. Thanks, I'll look into them. I just asked for advice on here because when I last spoke to my GP about it a few months ago, she was honestly completely clueless and not much help at all. All she advised was another Pill, and as I said three previous experiences on three types has kinda made me think that that's not a good idea. I don't want to go on something hormonal again. It seems to have the worse kind of effect on me.
Posted 31 Aug 2011
DialADaisy

I haven't heard of those. Thanks, I'll look into them. I just asked for advice on here because when I last spoke to my GP about it a few months ago, she was honestly completely clueless and not much help at all. All she advised was another Pill, and as I said three previous experiences on three types has kinda made me think that that's not a good idea. I don't want to go on something hormonal again. It seems to have the worse kind of effect on me.


Get a new GP. I had one who tried to put me back on the Pill which raised my blood pressure to a level where I was at risk of having a stroke.  I refused and went to see his colleague instead.  She told me I was never to be put on anything containing oestrogen ever again and worked with me to find suitable alternatives.  It took years and surgery but she finally got me sorted out.  Clueless GPs are just a waste of your time, so look around until you find one you're happy with, it's your right.



Posted 31 Aug 2011
I'm on Implanon, I turned into a crazy lady for 24 hours, turned into a paranoid maniac monster, then became normal, and hey presto, two periods in 18 months, huzzah!!!!

Posted 31 Aug 2011
I agree with FdM.

I have PCOS and don't have any periods, at all, ever and the pill reacted badly with my mental health issues. I was on Mercilon for a couple of years, then went insane so came off it. My GP kept pushing me to try different pills and wasn't keen on me going without anything because of my PCOS. I tried a few but they all sent me doolally I didn't and still don't like the idea of pushing hormones down my throat, especially considering how shaky my moods are anyway.

I didn't get a new GP but I went to see a private gynaecologist on referral from my GP. For the sake of a couple hundred pounds it was worth it. I urge you to do the same, or if you can't afford it, ask your GP for a referral to see a specialist. GPs tend to push you to go on the pill.

In case you're wondering I use condoms as a non-hormonal, non-invasive method of contraception. Not 100% protective but it does the job.

Posted 31 Aug 2011
Edited by beauvoir 31 Aug 2011
beauvoir

I agree with FdM. I have PCOS and don't have any periods, at all, ever and the pill reacted badly with my mental health issues. I was on Mercilon for a couple of years, then went insane so came off it. My GP kept pushing me to try different pills and wasn't keen on me going without anything because of my PCOS. I tried a few but they all sent me doolally I didn't and still don't like the idea of pushing hormones down my throat, especially considering how shaky my moods are anyway. I didn't get a new GP but I went to see a private gynaecologist on referral from my GP. For the sake of a couple hundred pounds it was worth it. I urge you to do the same, or if you can't afford it, ask your GP for a referral to see a specialist. GPs tend to push you to go on the pill. In case you're wondering I use condoms as a non-hormonal, non-invasive method of contraception. Not 100% protective but it does the job.


Aye, my consultant who treated my endo was keen to put me on hormonal injections to control it after the surgery ... they would have dried up my oestrogen and  would have had to be on HRT alongside them.  At 24.  Hell no!  I went hormone free and have never looked back since.  Doctors in general are very keen to put women on long acting hormonal contraception nowadays, there's been some sort of campaign to push their prescription in recent years





Posted 31 Aug 2011
I don't know why it is. Maybe it's because they assume all women want to protect their fertility?

Posted 31 Aug 2011
beauvoir

I don't know why it is. Maybe it's because they assume all women want to protect their fertility?


As far as I remember from the few reports I read years ago, it's a cost thing.  It's cheaper for the NHS if women are on long acting methods, so they've been pushing them

Besides, my fertility's effed anyway.  They told me a long time ago that if the endo was going to affect it, it would have done by then and there was no way of reversing it, but I won't know for sure unless I try to conceive.  So god only knows why they were so forceful about trying to push hormones onto me.  I was quite insulted when the consultant looked at me as if I was stupid and asked what I was going to do about contraception.  I'd been responsibly using condoms for many years before I was put on HC and was quite capable of carrying on afterwards, but that seemed to be irrelevant >_<








Posted 31 Aug 2011
Edited by Fleur_du_Mal 31 Aug 2011
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