Acrylic paint

14 posts
28 April 2011

Does any one know if you can use water based acrylic paint on a person.

Posted 28 April 2011
Bigfish3311
Photographer
Bigfish3311
All i know is when i paint (badly) i seem to end up with more paint on me than the canvas. It does come of but i find it does irritate my skin. Perhaps give it a miss. I suggest proper body paint.

Posted 28 April 2011
Edited by Bigfish3311 28 April 2011
ClaireShipman
Make Up Artist
ClaireShipma..
Don't do it George, the skin can suffocate under non body paints and it can cause a bad allergic reaction on some, for the sake of a few extra £££'s I'd say go with body paint.

Posted 28 April 2011
Edited by ClaireShipman 28 April 2011
MMM_WOW
Make Up Artist
MMM_WOW
II wouldnt, far to many allergic reactions to it, it is not designed or tested for prolonged use on the skin.
It might well be CE labelled and labelled as child friendly but it still doesnt mean it safe.
if you use it any insurance you have will become void as you are not using a cosmetic grade product on the skin.

Others will no doubt jump in with their tales of being immersed in it for 20 days and eating for 3 meals a day along with stories of how they have used caustic soda to get the effect they want on their models and how everyone survived and that Mua' and bodypainters are scaremongers , the choice is yours and your models , all i know is i would never use it as I do tend to like to work with people again.

Another reason apart from it not being safe on a body is quite simply it looks like shite, it peels, gloss's over in patches.

Skin safe products have been developed for a reason


and child safe does NOT mean skin safe

rant over
Posted 3 May 2011
granite_and_grace
Photographer
granite_and_..
I have used it for many years (often for full body coverage)and have never had a model that has suffered any problem or reaction from it. In fact I think it is far superior to some of the "body paints" available. If in doubt, always test a small area first.

Posted 3 May 2011
junelong
Make Up Artist
junelong
As a Make-up Artist, I'm with John (a well respected and experienced bodypainter) 100% on this, for all the reasons he has already stated.

Posted 3 May 2011
MMM_WOW
Make Up Artist
MMM_WOW
granite_and_grace

I have used it for many years (often for full body coverage)and have never had a model that has suffered any problem or reaction from it. In fact I think it is far superior to some of the "body paints" available. If in doubt, always test a small area first.


Far superior to use untested products on your model , always there are those that say they have done it with no reaction, try to do a bit of research and look what happens when there is a reaction, I am afraid I have far to much respect for my models and those I work with than to use things that are UNFIT and UNSAFE for purpose , but there again it's not my insurance or reputation at stake or the well being of my models and their livelihood

As for testing a small patch. just for your information patch testing wont necessarily work as it would have to be left on for the same amount of time as the finished paint and quite often the reaction can erupt AFTER the stuff has been removed  
Posted 3 May 2011
ClaireShipman
Make Up Artist
ClaireShipma..
granite_and_grace

I have used it for many years (often for full body coverage)and have never had a model that has suffered any problem or reaction from it. In fact I think it is far superior to some of the "body paints" available. If in doubt, always test a small area first.


Just because 'some' don't have an allergic reaction doesn't mean no one will... out of 10 people you may only get one who will react but she / he may react badly and could end up in hospital, but thats your decision personally I wouldn't take the risk
Posted 3 May 2011
JeromeRazoir
Photographer
JeromeRazoir
ClaireShipman

Just because 'some' don't have an allergic reaction doesn't mean no one will... out of 10 people you may only get one who will react but she / he may react badly and could end up in hospital, but thats your decision personally I wouldn't take the risk


I have to agree strongly with that. Look up anaphylactic shock. Anaphylaxis only kills a small percentage of the people who get it but the small percentage who die STAY DEAD.

Although it is rare, it is mandatory in hospitals and doctors' surgeries to have injectable adrenaline on hand, together with resuscitation kit when giving certain drugs.

MOST people can eat Snikkers Bars. They have lots of lovely pea-nuts in them. Pea-nuts will kill a very small percentage of people.

Now that you have that knowledge you are not simply risking invalidating your insurance. You are risking a manslaughter by negligence case. 30 years potentially for that. Go on, buy the proper stuff!
Posted 3 May 2011
Catscreations
Make Up Artist
Catscreation..
There's been a lot of talk about this since MAC inexplicably called that 'new' liquid body paint of theirs 'acrylic'. Grrrrreat. Considering there's been a huge campaign by all sorts of body-artists to ban acrylics on skin it seemed mad...I even have 'no acrylic' badges that were given to me at some of the big body art conferences!

Acrylics are non-toxic but that just means they probably won't poison you if eaten. They aren't cosmetics and I would have thought/ hoped that any professional would only be using skin-safe products on models.

I paint a lot in Hong Kong and have several times seen 'local' body artists or face painters use acrylics on kids/ models and have, even in that small time, seen several nasty reactions and had models complain to me about what was put on them and how nasty it felt/ difficult it was to get off. Theres also a notorious horrible photo on facebook that keeps resurfacing (good!) of some poor kid who was painted with acrylics and ended up almost scarred in the shape of the 'artwork'.

If you need waterproof body paints there are brands and products that will do that w/o having to resort to actual acrylics.

Cat

Posted 19 April 2012
Secondskin
Make Up Artist
Secondskin
Hey george I'm with John and Claire on this. As a body painter I would never EVER use acrylics on a person. Why would you when there are so many paints around specifically for human skin! We body painters spend a lot of money on the correct paints for good reason 😊 It's like when people ask if it's ok to spray the skin with hairspray to fix a paint???? That's what fixative is for!! Personally I'm with John...I care about my clients! Which means absolutely only the safest options so George...lol just book me...u know you want to haha x
Posted 25 April 2012
Edited by Secondskin 25 April 2012
Keltica
Photographer
Keltica
Nah not a chance but you could always try it on yourself first...
Posted 26 April 2012
I remember I covered myself with emulsion awhile ago for a shoot..

Nothing bad happened but since doing it I've read so many nasty stories and I'm just lucky/glad nothing terrible happened to my skin.. Silly silly me.. it did look cool though!

Posted 26 April 2012
artistoli
Photographer
artistoli
As someone well versed with acrylic paints (I've been painting for over fifteen years) I'd say this. Artists acrylics are not designed for use on people, plain and simple. Saying that, most people won't have a bad reaction to them on their skin. I've been surrounded by other students all with lots of paint all over them for years on end in college and uni, and I've got it on my skin half the time too. Never seen an allergic reaction to date, but for body painting they won't allow the skin to breathe, they will void any insurance, they will crack up when people move and they will be a pain in the butt to remove after. Considering that there are plenty of body paints available at a similar price to good quality artist's acrylics (good acrylic paint isn't cheap anyway - don't be fooled by the cheap stuff for a couple of pounds - it will give poor results even on canvas).

So it doesn't really make any sense to use artist's acrylics on a person in most cases. Can't really see any advantage for true body painting. If you were wanting to do something that did require them, like a girl painting a canvas who had lots of smears on her etc, then it probably would make sense to just use artist's acrylics, but in that case just make sure they test some on a small patch of skin a couple of weeks before the shoot (and the same brand and type of paint, not just 'acrylics' because believe me not all paints are created equal!), and get them to sign something saying that they know they are applying something that isn't 'skin safe' and that they are responsible for anything that happens. But then that's so much hassle it probably easier to use skin safe products in the first place.



Posted 26 April 2012
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