Advice shooting in hotel room

Advice shooting in hotel room

46 posts
19 Dec 2010
digitalexcel
Photographer
digitalexcel
I am looking to shoot in a hotel room soon for the first time very soon and wondered if there is any good advice out there? I have read a few threads here on the forums already (Gareth Hickey's first hotel shoot) but just wanted to ask for general advice and a few questions as well.

Lighting I currently use - x2 430 ex flashes, x1 420 EZ, reflector &  60x60 soft box.

1.Is there any benefit/advantages in purchasing a larger soft box or even an umbrella to create softer more even light? Is there a best type of umbrella to use in small spaces? I think I can achieve the desired result with the equipment I currently own but just wondered if anyone that has shot in a hotel room and has a particular setup they use or recommend?
2. When choosing a room is it best to choose a particular facing room, north facing or not much of a factor?
3. Advice in trying to secure the room for a knock down price?
4. Is it the best policy to inform the hotel what you are going to be doing in the room?

Thanks
Posted 19 Dec 2010
Andy_B
Photographer
Andy_B
1. A softbox is better than a brolly (especially a shoot through one) - since hotel room ceilings are invariably low and light-painted. If you used a shoot-shrough, you end up with light reflected everywhere and very flat lighting.
2. Good luck getting the sun to cooperate with you during the next few months!
3. Use somewhere like Laterooms.com
4. I think it's best to not inform them. If you're subtle about it and not overladen with kit then 'what they don't know won't hurt them'.

Posted 19 Dec 2010
MarkG
Photographer
MarkG
digitalexcel

I am looking to shoot in a hotel room soon for the first time very soon and wondered if there is any good advice out there?


Don't allow a chaperone. A threesome checking into a hotel room tends to raise eyebrows at reception! LOL
Posted 19 Dec 2010
digitalexcel
Photographer
digitalexcel
Thank you for the replies so far they are appreciated. Laterooms is great advice thanks. MarkG - LOL well it's going to look a little dodgy as the plan is to shoot 3 models throughout the day to get the most from the room
Posted 19 Dec 2010
MarkG
Photographer
MarkG
digitalexcel

MarkG - LOL well it's going to look a little dodgy as the plan is to shoot 3 models throughout the day to get the most from the room


Haha, way to go....

So far as choice of room goes try to avoid one that overlooks the car park/main entrance - the flash firing every few seconds tends to draw attention.

Big light sources in small rooms tend to make for dull lighting. I'd go for small soft boxes, gridded if possible.
Posted 19 Dec 2010
Edited by MarkG 19 Dec 2010
CameraWillD40
Photographer
CameraWillD4..
digitalexcel
I am looking to shoot in a hotel room soon for the first time very soon and wondered if there is any good advice out there? I have read a few threads here on the forums already (Gareth Hickey's first hotel shoot) but just wanted to ask for general advice and a few questions as well. Lighting I currently use - x2 430 ex flashes, x1 420 EZ, reflector &  60x60 soft box. 1.Is there any benefit/advantages in purchasing a larger soft box or even an umbrella to create softer more even light? Is there a best type of umbrella to use in small spaces? I think I can achieve the desired result with the equipment I currently own but just wondered if anyone that has shot in a hotel room and has a particular setup they use or recommend? 2. When choosing a room is it best to choose a particular facing room, north facing or not much of a factor? 3. Advice in trying to secure the room for a knock down price? 4. Is it the best policy to inform the hotel what you are going to be doing in the room? Thanks
Never shot in a hotel, but I don't think its too different to working in the models home, which I do in probably 90% of my shoots. So.. 1. What are you wanting to shoot specifically? What you have is very similar to my set-up that I use on home shoots so I don't see any problem there. 2. You're using two flash heads so I don't think this matters unless you specifically want to use daylight to create a special effect. 3. ? Yellow pages, call local hotels? But to cheaper room will be very basic and not give you many options other than shooting on the 4. I wouldn't. They could well think something sleazy is going on and just say no. Best to carry your equipment in a fairly generic bag so not to attract attention. Hope your shoot goes well
Posted 19 Dec 2010
digitalexcel
Photographer
digitalexcel
CameraWillD40 I am shooting Lingerie for the first time :/. I shoot mostly on location with this setup and was just making sure it was enough and no further expenditure was needed.

General consensus is not to inform the hotel.... hmmm wasn't banking on that tbh

Cheers again.

Posted 19 Dec 2010
Studio1910
Photographer
Studio1910
- Pull the curtains to stop people seeing the flash go off from outside.
- Put a towel at the bottom of the main door, to stop people seeing the flash go off from the corridor.
- Try to use large chains like travel lodge or premier inn.
- Put a rubber glove or cling film over the smoke detector is your shooting in the shower.
Posted 19 Dec 2010
digitalexcel
Photographer
digitalexcel
"- Try to use large chains like travel lodge or premier inn."

They provide chains ??emoticon

HAHA got completely the wrong end of the stick there, I had to keep reading it before it sank in what you were talking about. Was going to say it's not that kind of shoot my friend
Posted 19 Dec 2010
Edited by digitalexcel 19 Dec 2010
MarkG
Photographer
MarkG
digitalexcel

General consensus is not to inform the hotel.... hmmm wasn't banking on that tbh


There are some nice wedding venues that allow photographers they know to use the place during the week when they're not busy. Trade for pictures so they can refresh their literature and website. You need to get to know the venue manager pretty well though. And most won't allow any nudity and some may be cautious about lingerie too. If you do weddings it's something to work towards at the better venues.
Posted 19 Dec 2010
PhilDrinkwater
Photographer
PhilDrinkwat..
First decide what look you want, then decide how best to achieve it. There are no "good setups for hotel rooms" - just a selection of setups which can work in semi-confined space which may or may not suit the style of shot that you want to achieve.

I've seen hard, soft and bounced light setups which all work well. I've also seen pure natural light and natural light and fill. I've seen setups with rim lights too.

Decide what you want to achieve and then look at how you could achieve it. If you can't achieve it in the space you have, look at how close you can get.

On the final point, I'd always advise the hotel about what I was doing.

Posted 20 Dec 2010
yamahaglyn
Photographer
yamahaglyn
digitalexcel

Thank you for the replies so far they are appreciated. Laterooms is great advice thanks. MarkG - LOL well it's going to look a little dodgy as the plan is to shoot 3 models throughout the day to get the most from the room


The hotel receptionist is going to think your a right stud muffin!emoticon

Posted 20 Dec 2010
PhilDrinkwater
Photographer
PhilDrinkwat..
yamahaglyn

The hotel receptionist is going to think your a right stud muffin!emoticon


Haha! emoticon
Posted 20 Dec 2010
Moorlane
Photographer
Moorlane
Given the cost of photographic equipment I always use a SPORTS bag for my gear.This makes it look like Im on my way back from the gym ( ! ) .I think thats better than carrying a bag that screams...photographer on way to shoot with expensive gear! It does puzzle the model a little but hey ho!

Posted 20 Dec 2010
fotokarl
Photographer
fotokarl
If you intend to publish, make sure you get a location release.

Posted 20 Dec 2010
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