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David Hibberd is off-line
25 August 2014 14:00
davidhibberd
Photographer
davidhibberd
Location
United Kingdom
Highland


Quote from IainT
A camera is a simple tool and photography is not difficult if you can take a picture. Don't listen to people who try to complicate it. Don't listen to people trying to baffle you with technical stuff. Don't listen to people who try to sell you stuff you don't need.  



Well said

Here for a short time for a good time


25 August 2014 15:07
NiaomiMaiden
Model


Thank you everyone


Paul thomas Ford is off-lineSilver Member
25 August 2014 15:11
paulford
Photographer
paulford
Location
United Kingdom
South Yorkshire
Doncaster

Might be a silly question but have you got a camera?


Paul thomas Ford is off-lineSilver Member
25 August 2014 15:15
paulford
Photographer
paulford
Location
United Kingdom
South Yorkshire
Doncaster

Or have you got access to one that has control over apertures and shutter speeds.


Alan Johnson is off-line
26 August 2014 01:42
Alan_Jay
Photographer
Alan_Jay
Location
United Kingdom
South Yorkshire


Hi Naomi,
What Ian says is very true,  though knowing the 'rules' will always be a help.  Then you can break them with the intention of doing so!
e.g the rule of thirds explains why certain composition works.  Putting the main focus on a third line,  draws attention to it;  Putting it where two lines cross tends to to draw maximum attention to it.  (when I learnt it,  I checked some classic paintings and was surprised at just how many work to this rule!)

Depth of field is something that often trips up new photographers.  Remembering that: the bigger the number, the smaller the hole - the greater the depth of field,  will be useful in any genre of photography.  The 'number' being the Aperture or fstop.  This is why portrait photographers use a lowish number and landscape photographers tend to use a big number.
A good practice exercise, is to set up a line of 10 ish bottles;  standing at one end and slightly to the side,  so that you can see them all,  take a series of photos.  Set the camera on a tripod or table,  so that it remains in the same place. Focus in the same place,  but go through the apertures.  When you look at them on your PC,  you will see how the depth of field changes.

Looking around the viewfinder BEFORE pressing the shutter release!  Mostly we concentrate on the subject we are photographing, understandably!  By looking around the viewfinder you are likely to notice what else will be included and avoid sloping horisons, telegraph poles growing out of peoples' heads etc.

Take your time.  There are no prizes for taking the most photos in any given time period.

As you look at your photos,  ask yourself why they do or do not work.  You will probably learn more from the 'bad' photos,  than you do from the great ones.

There is a wealth of information on the internet.

Ask people questions.  Whilst a few are precious about technique etc.,  most of us are very happy to chat or answer questions.

Have fun.
You can't buy happiness, but you can buy a motorbike and that's pretty close! :o)



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