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Sport/ aerial photography... which make of digital equipment is best for long distance airshow images?

PETE STERN is off-line
10 July 2014 08:17
Pete7890
Photographer
Pete7890
Location
United Kingdom
Cambridgeshire
PETERBOROUGH / LONDON

Hello,

          I have tried all sorts of Nikon  digital equipment and can't get crisp magazine type shots of propeller type aircraft comming at me at 300 miles an hour!

I try to get the shutter speed between 1/25 to 1/500. F 11 usin D3200. D90, D100 Bodies and 70 to 300 to 18 to 55 Nikon D Lenses.( PROG.A.M. modes etc.)

Getting blue blur vignetting on edges of image and metering struggles in variable lighting, ie clouds sunshine etc?

Shall I dump the Nikons and start again witn Cannon Stuff?....or is it me?....what do the pro's use?
                                                                                                                                                                                     Any ideas Please Ta Pete.


Neil Anderson is off-line
10 July 2014 08:34
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
Location
United Kingdom
London
West London

When you say all types of Nikon equipment you seem to be referring to entry level / amateur gear (judging by your list).
I think you will find that there is much more difference between Nikon and Canon entry level and Nikon and Canon at more advanced levels than there is between the brands. I would be very surprised if a similar level of canon camera and lenses would give you notably better (or worse) results

If something is approaching you at 300 mph it is unlikely that a shutter speed of 1/25th will be suitable.

Having said that, I would expect to be able to get decent results with a D90 (which is similar to a D300) or a D3200. If I was looking to get better results with your kit I would start by getting better quality lenses.

If you want specific advice on how to get better results with your existing equipment try posting a photo you are unhappy with, for people to offer advice (I'm sure there are a number of airshow enthusiasts on here)
Like any dealer he was watching for the card that is so high and wild he'll never need to deal another...


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
10 July 2014 08:46
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

These are technique problems, not gear problems.
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


DG Imaging is off-line
10 July 2014 09:14
DennisG
Photographer
DennisG
Location
United Kingdom
Oxfordshire
Banbury

Check this out?

https://flic.kr/s/aHsjYRmJWV

Nikon D3 with Sigma 120-300 Zoom.


Paul Jones is off-line
10 July 2014 10:58
Paul_Jones
Photographer
Paul_Jones
Location
United Kingdom
Lancashire
Wigan

Quote from Pete7890
I have tried all sorts of Nikon  digital equipment and can't get crisp magazine type shots of propeller type aircraft comming at me at 300 miles an hour!
I try to get the shutter speed between 1/25 to 1/500. F 11 usin D3200. D90, D100 Bodies and 70 to 300 to 18 to 55 Nikon D Lenses.( PROG.A.M. modes etc.)
Getting blue blur vignetting on edges of image and metering struggles in variable lighting, ie clouds sunshine etc?
Shall I dump the Nikons and start again witn Cannon Stuff?....or is it me?



Quote from RedChecker
These are technique problems, not gear problems.



I'd agree with Steven. 

You might find these links helpful...

http://www.digitalcameraworld.com/2013/08/09/aviation-photography-tips-for-taking-amazing-pictures-of-airplanes/

http://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?22593-BEST-SHUTTER-SPEED-FOR-AIRCRAFT-PROPELLER-BLADES


Best regards
Paul
www.PaulJones.org (Glamour / Portraits / NSFW)


4EverYoung is off-line
11 July 2014 12:42
Midnite
Photographer
Midnite
Location
United Kingdom
Cambridgeshire
Peterborough

Quote from RedChecker
These are technique problems, not gear problems.



Agreed.

I don't use less than 1/500th shutter speed for horses never mind planes.

Besides that with the 300mm @ 300 on a crop sensor, nikon i believe being 1.5x would indicate a hand hold shutter speed of at least 1/450th to cut motion blur, then a slower shutter to get prop motion or a good panning technique to get background motion.
I have never failed But i have discovered thousands of approches which don't work.


w4pictures is off-line
11 July 2014 14:47
w4pictures
Photographer
w4pictures
Location
United Kingdom
London
Chiswick

Quote from RedChecker
These are technique problems, not gear problems.



Exactly this

However, the blue blur you mention may be a confusion with chromatic abberation in which case better lenses will probably help.


Ellesse Photography is off-lineSilver Member
11 July 2014 15:26
EllessePhotography
Photographer
EllessePhotography
Location
United Kingdom
Edinburgh
Edinburgh

Quote from RedChecker
These are technique problems, not gear problems.



+1


Spike is off-line
13 July 2014 06:32
Spike
Photographer
Spike
Location
United Kingdom
Hertfordshire
St Albans



http://petapixel.com/2014/07/11/simple-chart-every-photographer-keep-back-pocket-reminder/
"Photoshop is there to cut diamonds, not polish turds"


Profile Pictures is off-line
13 July 2014 07:01
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictures
Location
United Kingdom
Suffolk
Bury St Edmunds

I don't shoot aircraft, so wouldn't normally comment; but having seen the stupid pie chart above, feel compelled at least to try and be helpful.

You'll probably want to use whatever the continual tracking focus mode is for your camera, on canon it's called A1servo, Nikon will have an equivalent. Also your shutter speed ought to be at least a match to your focal length ( plus crop factor) so if you've a 300mm lens and a crop factor of x1.5, that'd mean a minimum of 1/450th shutter speed to avoid shake. I'd guess at range, an aperture of f8 would be all enough, some lens get noticeably less sharp by f11. Might be worth thinking about spot exposure too, so the item you focus on is well exposed, the sky probably less so. Practice panning smoothly to give the camera a chance to autofocus and have the drive in multiple exposure mode to catch a series of pictures as the plane zips by.

You might have to bite the bullet and get a quality zoom lens to stand much chance with this style of shooting, I'm guessing a 300mm is a useful length though.

Hopefully, someone who does this a lot and isn't intent on acting the donkey, will come along and develop further.



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