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Holding your camera

Neil Anderson is off-line
23 April 2014 07:28
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
Location
United Kingdom
London
West London

When people take a landscape aspect photograph everyone seems to hold the camera in much the same way, as clearly the camera has a top and a bottom.
When it comes to portrait mode it seems to me that most people rotate the camera anti-clockwise and stick their right elbow in the air. I notice this particularly as I see a lot of photographers (or at least people with cameras) at gigs every week. Sticking the elbow in the air is obviously less stable in general, and at busy events like live gigs where you may get knocked a much worse stance. It is also more likely that your elbow will obstruct other photographers or audience members.
I can see it doesn't make much difference if you are using studio flash but in most other circumstances it must be more stable - I can even use the camera with one hand with a fair degree of success as the weight is on the palm and straight arm rather than swinging from the crooked arm.
So why don't people turn the camera clockwise and get a stable pose ?
Like any dealer he was watching for the card that is so high and wild he'll never need to deal another...


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
23 April 2014 07:39
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

We rotate them anti-clockwise because some of us have grips/secondary/portrait grips built into our cameras
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


marlham is off-line
23 April 2014 07:51
marlhamphoto
Photographer
This member has been reset to pending
marlhamphoto
Location
United Kingdom
Kent
Canterbury

Quote from stolenfaces
So why don't people turn the camera clockwise and get a stable pose ?


Pose? Interesting mindset for a photographer...



Neil Anderson is off-line
23 April 2014 07:55
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
Location
United Kingdom
London
West London

Quote from RedChecker
We rotate them anti-clockwise because some of us have grips/secondary/portrait grips built into our cameras



So do I, but hold it with my left hand - but I don't stolenfaces is a naughty person around with zooms, which is presumably what you need to use your left hand for.
It's true that with a grip you wouldn't need to stick your elbow in the air, but most people don't have grips....
Like any dealer he was watching for the card that is so high and wild he'll never need to deal another...


Neil Anderson is off-line
23 April 2014 07:57
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
Location
United Kingdom
London
West London

Quote from marlhamphoto

Pose? Interesting mindset for a photographer...





"Pose: To assume or hold a particular position or posture"
Like any dealer he was watching for the card that is so high and wild he'll never need to deal another...


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
23 April 2014 08:05
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

Quote from stolenfaces
It's true that with a grip you wouldn't need to stick your elbow in the air, but most people don't have grips....



Their loss I suppose...
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


OldMaster is off-line
23 April 2014 08:52
OldMaster
Photographer
OldMaster
Location
United Kingdom
Hertfordshire
Harpenden

Have grips on all my camera bodies...apart from the comfort, added mass and shutter release in the correct place I find I can hold it steadier that way. I also find I can't twist my hand sufficiently to hold the camera the other way up! By "dangling" it from the grip I find it hangs naturally in portrait mode the left hand supporting the lens. I have found this to be the most stable of methods.

Always preferred my 120 cameras with 45 degree prisms which avoided the problem completely! And for portrait and fashion the chest height position was more flattering then the dangers of eye level perspective? Its the crouching down knees bend that does me in with eye level dslrs, not which vertical orientation It is in...getting old!


w4pictures is off-line
23 April 2014 08:55
w4pictures
Photographer
w4pictures
Location
United Kingdom
London
Chiswick

If you use your right eye to the eyepiece, its more comfortable to anticlock. Your hooter doesn't get in the way.


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
23 April 2014 09:04
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

Besides, so what if you're arm's in the air and it obstructs others (that's what elbows are for afterall). I'm more likely to feel discomfort from my right wrist bending back with cranking the camera the other way.
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


Neil Anderson is off-line
23 April 2014 09:31
stolenfaces
Photographer
stolenfaces
Location
United Kingdom
London
West London

Quote from RedChecker
Besides, so what if you're arm's in the air and it obstructs others (that's what elbows are for afterall). I'm more likely to feel discomfort from my right wrist bending back with cranking the camera the other way.



Depends whether your camera is beer resistant. Although due to the inherent instability of the position I usually find a slight push is all that is required to make them move, failing that a steel toecap in the back of the calf is invariably successful.

I suppose you would have to bend the wrist back excessively if you want to shoot downwards at a model in a classic GWC manner.
Like any dealer he was watching for the card that is so high and wild he'll never need to deal another...



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