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Lens recommendations for wedding photography?? (Canon)

12 January 2014 08:49
Ron_H
Photographer


Hi guys,

A friend of mine has asked if I'll do the photos for her wedding.
Having never done weddings before I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on what would be a good lens (Canon) for this so I can hire one for the occasion?
If you have done any wedding photography yourself I would really appreciate your recommendations.

Thanks.
Ron


Steven Jardine is off-linePlatinum Member
12 January 2014 08:52
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

Use the lens you are most used to, it makes no sense to be familiarising yourself with a new lens while working (and being unaware of what it can achieve/its limitations).
When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All of your pain is felt by others. The same thing happens when you are stupid.


Shawn Barker is off-line
12 January 2014 09:15
FrameworksMedia
Photographer
FrameworksMedia
Location
United Kingdom
Staffordshire
Stoke-on-Trent

I shoot weddings full time (but use Nikon). However the following advice may be useful.

Use a lens with the fastest aperture that you have, normally in the region of f1.4-f2.8. There's generally a no flash policy during ceremonies , so you'll be after any available light that you can get, particularly during these dark winter months.

If you are the main shooter, avoid long telephoto's as your primary lens, it'll place you too far away for accurate communication and allow plenty of space for some a@@hole to walk between. Obviously if you need a long zoom during the ceremony and speeches due to positioning then use it, but you may find a monopole useful to avoid camera shake. Even better if you have a second body is to have 2 lenses to avoid wasted time switching

Generally a 24-70 and a 70-200 should cover it, possibly with a nice 85mm prime for some money shots (focal lengths for full frame). It's worth remembering that 'true' friends will be on the guest list to allow them to enjoy the wedding and relax, so don't scrimp on the bill.


12 January 2014 09:41
Ron_H
Photographer


Thanks FrameworksMedia, some very useful tips there....particularly the advice on lenses for photos during the ceremony. I never considered a "no flash" policy. I don't have a 2nd body but could probably borrow one (another great tip).

Thanks a lot


Mantisphoto is off-lineSilver Member
12 January 2014 10:03
mantisphoto
Photographer
mantisphoto
Location
United Kingdom
Birmingham


Well, somebody has to say it....

Dont ruin your friendship with them by screwing up their wedding photos... tell them to get a professional!

Only joking... we all start somewhere...
Make it clear to them you arent a wedding photographer tho, so not to expect miracles. On my first wedding as a favour, I got them to sign a contract saying they knew I was a beginner and there would be no blame if the photos didnt turn out how they expected, just to cover myself. They couldnt afford anyone else so were happy with it.

If shooting Full Frame then as already said, a 24-70 f2.8 and a 70-200 f2.8 would be ideal... both available for rentals from several places if you dont have them.
If those arent available I have had decent enough results with a 24-105 f4 but its not ideal. Depends what body you are using tho, as my 6D is ok with noise at 3200 ISO if really needed to get back the extra stop lost on aperture.

Most of all, make sure you know the running orer so you dont miss the key events, be in the right place for the rings, kiss etc. Speak to the person conducting the ceremony before hand so you know whats allowed etc. Some can be a bit funny, but pthers can be very helpful allowing time to get shots, telling you the best places to stand etc if you are unsure.

Most of all, just try to enjoy it!




Oscars Photostudio is off-line
12 January 2014 12:15
oscar
Photographer
oscar
Location
United Kingdom
Cheshire
Nr Warrington

When and where is the wedding?
Your feet are the best zoom you have -use them.
Plan so that you know where you will be for each image.


Shawn Barker is off-line
12 January 2014 12:39
FrameworksMedia
Photographer
FrameworksMedia
Location
United Kingdom
Staffordshire
Stoke-on-Trent

Quote from oscar
When and where is the wedding? Your feet are the best zoom you have -use them. Plan so that you know where you will be for each image.



Although there are times when it's best not to move too much. Many officials have tightened up their photography regulations over the last few years, mainly after having experienced previous  weddings ruined by inexperienced photographers who act as a distraction. practice your Ninja moves and certainly don't get yourself in a corner and walk between the bride and groom (I have the video evidence!)

Remember it's their day, not yours so try to be concise and allow the day to revolve around them and not  you. A good photographer will help the day flow as well as have the camera skills.


Moorlane is off-line
12 January 2014 15:01
Moorlane
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
Greater Manchester


and after every group shot just say...thank you !


Dave Beasley is off-line
12 January 2014 16:31
eosfan
Photographer
eosfan
Location
United Kingdom
Surrey
Guildford

And don't forget the practicalities i.e.

Know where you can park at the church (town centre churches sometimes have no parking), at the reception.
Know the route from church to reception.
Where will you take photos at the church, what is your plan if it is pouring with rain as bride/groom come out of church?

Carry a spare of everything if possible - fresh set of batteries for flash, sufficient memory cards, spare camera body (if possible), spare lens (50mm, 24-105mm), spare fully charged camera battery.

Before the big day, drive/walk your routes - your house to brides house (if applicable), brides house to church, church to reception. Know where you will aim to park at each location but have a second option ready.

If possible talk to the vicar before the wedding day, find out what his house rules are, where you can/cannot stand etc

Dave


CSD Images is off-line
12 January 2014 17:15
CSD_Images
Photographer
CSD_Images
Location
United Kingdom
Grampian
Aberdeen

The lenses the pro's use most are:

24-70L 2.8
70-200L 2.8

Covers pretty much all the live fire situations in the ceremonies/parties. They also rely on 50mm and 85mm for low-light work and a macro lens for ring shots. They also generally have two bodies so no need for wasting time for lens swaps and missing the moment.

For weddings you literally going to be covering long and short range, low-light and no light situations. You've got to be able to think on your feet and plan accordingly. Plus have the gear to adapt to those situations.

As to everything else you plan, engage and if all else fails. Run.
www.flickr.com/photos/csd_images | www.celticshadows.co.uk



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