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The death of photography?

Delamia is off-line
05 January 2014 11:58
Rob_Mac
Photographer
Rob_Mac
Location
United Kingdom
Staffordshire
Burton-Upon-Trent



"It's really weird," says Antonio Olmos. "Photography has never been so popular, but it's getting destroyed. There have never been so many photographs taken, but photography is dying."

Not sure if this has been raised here before but thought I'd share this article from the Guardian site..

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/dec/13/death-of-photography-camera-phones



It's a fairly objective article and raises points both for and against the 'death of photography' by the prevalent smart phone and such, but IMO, there is truth to this.

''This was also the week in which psychologists argued there is a "photo-taking impairment effect". That means if we take a photo of something we're less likely to remember it than if we'd looked at it with our eyes.''

It seems you're more likely nowadays to have you picture taken with somebody rather than share with them any meaningful experience. The attitude today seems to be..

'as long as I get lots of likes on last night's pictures - then it was a good night'


The way I see it, the fact that anybody can have apparent approval from their peers within 10 seconds of actually taking the image (facebook etc), kinda takes away the consideration that makes a good image, and just as importantly, the confidence and ability to deliver quality results that speak for its self; without relying on a caption or any other context.


What are you thoughts?


'


Rich G is off-line
05 January 2014 12:16
SMILESPHOTO
Photographer
SMILESPHOTO
Location
United Kingdom
Kent


I think the difference between taking an image using your phone and doing so using your camera is similar to comparing a photographer to the paparazzi - one captures, the other creates.

In both circumstances, both have their uses but have to be seen as completely different entities.
HAPPY TO WORK UP TO OPEN WALLET LEVELS


Howard Mansfield is off-line
05 January 2014 12:23
HMansfield
Photographer
HMansfield
Location
United Kingdom
Nottinghamshire


There's an apostrophe in your signature. I've just gotten incredibly angry and trying to wipe that bit of dirt off my screen.

Anyway, the "art" of photography isn't dying. Since consumer level cameras came into existence there were those were content to just point it at something to make a visual record of it. That hasn't changed.

35mm was supposed to bring in the death of "real photography". So was 110. So was APS. So was digital.

It hasn't. It's just made it easier for the consumer, and brought in greater options for the artist photographer. Anyone who thinks that that iPhone pic of their dinner or the blurry shot of their mates in a nightclub, taken purely as a record of what happened that day is in anyway on the same level as the type of works displayed on a website like 1x is either trolling, blind or just thick as pigHMansfield is a naughty person .
Everyone knows photographers make up the hottest proportions of Britains single men. - Kater


David Heels is off-line
05 January 2014 12:34
Crippen
Photographer
Crippen
Location
United Kingdom
South Yorkshire
Sheffield

Candid photography, 'snapping', is a far cry from those who go to great lengths setting up a shot. Hiring models, props, locations, building sets, employing designers, make up artists, planning, story-boarding, pre-lighting, etc.

Someone like David Lachapelle, Gregory Crewdson, or some wildlife photographer who spends weeks sat out in the cold waiting for that perfect shot, are a million miles away from Auntie Nelly and her old Instamatic.


Dave


RGBphoto is off-lineSilver Member
05 January 2014 12:38
magpie1
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
Tyne and Wear
Newcastle

A long time ago, the death of painting was imminent, still seems to be here. There are significant changes in the nature of photography, as a medium. One is indeed linked to its ubiquity, almost everyone owns a digital camera, of some sort, and image capture on a solid state device is, essentially free, per image, so any pretence of elitism or exclusivity, dependent on economics, no need to buy film, is gone.
It is true that the ability to capture an image no way assures it will be a good image and the sheer number of images abroad means finding worthwhile ones very difficult.
I do, totally agree with the 'photo taking impairment effect' having witnessed a coach full of tourists, "hose down" Durham Cathedral, with still and video cameras, yet none of them appeared to look directly at the Cathedral itself! The ptie effect also manifests itself in people believing, somehow, that the possession of the image and real experience of the place are the same.
The other historically significant aspect of digital capture is that fewer images are actually retained, images are viewed, no more than a few times, on screen, then likely to be deleted. When 'hard prints' were the norm most families had lots of "old photographs" which may have had no great artistic merit, but as documents of a family or neighbourhood, over time were highly significant, with the delete button, no record exists anymore.


Profile Pictures is off-line
05 January 2014 12:40
profilepictures
Photographer
profilepictures
Location
United Kingdom
Suffolk
Bury St Edmunds

Have a quick squint around here, a photography site; you'll see the odd cool shot from an iPhone, a wealth of dross from bridge/compact/dslr and a tidy heap of beautiful shots taken by photographers. Nothing dying, not much changing; everything is ok ( unless you want to make a living out if owning a camera, then you have to be really a good photographer or bullprofilepictures is a naughty person ter and have a fair business sense in either case)


Delamia is off-line
05 January 2014 13:36
Rob_Mac
Photographer
Rob_Mac
Location
United Kingdom
Staffordshire
Burton-Upon-Trent

The headline is rather sensationalist, and for most professionals it is not the case, however, a wedding photographer for example will no doubt have noticed how many subjects are now more willing to attempt to be photographers themselves, than respectfully follow direction.

Given further regard, I don't think photography is dying, but I do believe people are less likley to appreciate an image unless they are in it and other people 'like' it - social conditioning, sorry - 'networking'.

But fair is fair. I'm sure there are a few models on here who have done well given all they had to start with were a few selfies.

I hadn't noticed the apostophy in my sig before - I'll keep it in if it keeps you on your toes
'


Bob is off-linePlatinum Member
05 January 2014 14:27
Bob
Photographer
Bob
Location
United Kingdom
Devon
Honiton

Photography isn't dead. It's merely evolving, just as it has always done over the last 180 or so years.

Back in the mid-80s I started shooting colour documentary images, coincidentally around the same time that the much more talented documentary photographer Martin Parr started shooting in colour to the horror of the establishment, and at first I was ridiculed by many of my peers who were still working in B&W. Some of them even said at the time that the massive expansion of amateur photographers shooting in colour with cheap SLRs like my Chinon would be "the death of photography" ... though of course it wasn't.

In the late 90s I started shooting on digital cameras (producing just 2000x1312 pixel images) and was again ridiculed by some of my peers, who could not see the advantages and who said that if amateurs gained access to low cost digital cameras it would be "the death of photography" ... though of course it wasn't.

Last week I penned a commercial feature article for a motoring magazine which I illustrated with documentary images captured on colour negative between 1984 and 1987. Far from these prints being "just happy snaps", as one professional photographer aquaintance of the day who believed "real photos are black and white" described them, today my shots are regarded as a valuable and unique historic record of a mostly colourless era rather than being something which killed photography.

I look forward with interest to the next evolution in photography, rather than fearing it might lead to the death of photography, and when the time is right I'll no doubt embrace it if it helps me with my work.

Bob


OldMaster is off-line
05 January 2014 14:48
OldMaster
Photographer
OldMaster
Location
United Kingdom
Hertfordshire
Harpenden

Difference is film to digital...although there are still only a few percent of image takers that are truly "photographers" there are so many more that can capture a technically acceptable image because of the advances in technology.

You would never contemplate, except for "art reasons" photographing models with an instamatic film camera but there are many who are happy to do so from mobile phone cameras upwards these days.

For me the biggest problem is the perception of image quality. Because cameras now will generally focus and expose reasonably accurately what they are pointed at, many think that makes the operator a photographer and it's become a self fulfilling prophecy. Inundated now with poor quality images, people have come to see that as the "norm" for quality. Of course we benefit where quality is not an issue with instant access to news stories, etc..but "photographs"..don't think so!

We also see it in the new photographers' "art" pictures. Desperate to create something new apparently we now just stand someone in front of the camera preferably with no expression or pose, ignore the background and dress them in bright colours..almost certain to get published in the BJP!!

Having said that it is also the home of some superb work but when do the majority of the population make any effort to expose themselves to either past or modern work from "real" photographers or any other art form come to that?



David is off-lineGold Member
05 January 2014 17:31
david1500
Photographer
david1500
Location
United Kingdom
Tyne and Wear
Gateshead


You say that my brownie 127 is out of date , surely not



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