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remote flash

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Samantha Duell is off-line
26 October 2013 06:27
SDuell
Photographer
SDuell
Location
United Kingdom
Cambridgeshire
whittlesey

im currently looking for a remote flash for my fujifilm dslr camera

any suggestions seen a few on ebay for £50 but not sure think they called yungoun (spelling maybe wrong)

any suggestions will be appriciated thanx


Strober is off-line
26 October 2013 11:17
Strober
Photographer
Strober
Location
United Kingdom
Cheshire
Manchester

They are many brands of speedlites on the market that u can use for remote flash, such as Yongnuo, Oloong, Travor, Voeloon, Canon, Nikon, Metz etc... etc... I wrote these FAQS for our own website so now hope they can help you with regards to buying a speedlite..... Cheers Strober

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1) Optical slave: An optical slave is a feature that allows the photographer to activate the flashgun remotely via any pop up flash in the world, As soon as the flashguns “Optical Slave” sees the flash / light from your pop up flash, then the Optical Slave will automatically activate your remote flashgun in sync with your DSLR's shutter. This is a great feature for those who do off camera flash work allot, however “Optical Slaves” require line of sight in order to work correctly.

2) TTL: TTL is a very useful feature found on most advanced flashguns, “Through The Lens” flashguns work with your cameras built in light meter in order to determine what the correct flash output should be in order to produce the final photograph. As a matter of fact at the highest end of the flashgun market then you will find that there are some flashguns that actually do have their own “light meters” built into their bodies, which means that they can even work with non compatible TTL cameras in order to turn them into TTL cameras. TTL is a very useful feature to bear in mind when choosing a speedlite.

3) Zoom Heads: Advanced Flashguns have movable zoom heads on them that will adjust the flash in order to correspond with the focal length of your lens. For example if your shooting on a focal length of 150mm then the flashgun will adjust it's zoom head in order to adjust the flash in order to focus / fire the flash of light to meet the required shooting distance as set by the photographer.

4) Rotatable Heads: Cheaper models tend to not have these and instead the heads of the flashgun will either just move up or down or perhaps they may even just be permanently fixed. However, rotatable heads on flash guns are very good as they allow the photographer to become more creative with regards to their work. For example, with a rotatable head you can bounce your flash of the ceiling (to diffuse your light) or off the walls (to diffuse your light) etc... So rotatable heads is perhaps another feature that you should look for when choosing a flashgun.

5) Autofocus Lamps: When it comes to autofocus on flashguns then they only appear to useful on the higher end models. This is because that the higher end models use “laser” like lamps to illuminate the subject which makes it as easy as 1, 2 and 3 for the camera to lock onto the subject. The more lower end models of flashguns that offer the autofocus lamp appear to be a bit to weak for professional work. For example if your a night club photographer (working in lowlight conditions) then you would be better off with a high end speedlite as their auto focus capabilities are excellent. But if you went for a lower end model, then you would find your self struggling to get your camera to lock onto the subject due to the fact that the lower end flashguns autofocus lamps tend to be too weak for professional work.

6) Overheat Protection Mode: On the higher end models of flashguns then you may find that they offer the photographer an overheating protection mode, this is very handy feature to have which ensure the safety of the actual flashgun. When photographers use their flashguns on full power for long periods of time then the batteries within the flashgun or the actual flash bulb it's self becomes to hot, and if it exceeds a certain temperature then this may cause permanent damage to the flashgun. However, with the overheating protection mode switched on, then when the flashgun detects a certain temperature with in it, it will then automatically turn off the flashgun and the photographer will be unable to use the flashgun unto the unit does “cool” down enough in order to meet the safety temperature as set by the manufacture.

7) External Battery Pack Ports: External battery pack ports are becoming more and more popular on flashguns these days. Likewise these are a very handy photographic accessory for photographers to have installed on their flashguns, as not only do they greatly increase the amount of shooting time in the field but they also help to greatly improve the recycling times of your flashgun. Which is why external battery packs are so popular amongst photojournalists.

8. PC Socket: The PC Socket is yet another useful feature that is being found on more and more flashguns these days, these are useful for connecting those radio triggers that don't have “hotshoes” on them and still use the PC sync cord. Not only that but you can also use an extra long PC sync cord with your flashguns, so this means that you get the constant reliability of cables as wireless technology can at times let you down. The PC sync socket is a great back up tool for photographers to have in their bag of tricks.

9) Commander modes: Some speedlites are that advanced that they can even control the light output of other flash units known as “slaves” or “remote units” all from the comfort of a press of a button from the top of your DSLR. Commander modes are naturally found on the higher end models of flashguns.

10) Repeating Flash: Not often used much by many photographers, but some flashguns have repeating flash modes built into them.




Quote from SDuell
im currently looking for a remote flash for my fujifilm dslr camera

any suggestions seen a few on ebay for £50 but not sure think they called yungoun (spelling maybe wrong)

any suggestions will be appriciated thanx


www.strober.co.uk


Dominic Thurmer is off-linePlatinum Member
27 October 2013 03:38
dominicdgt
Photographer
dominicdgt
Location
United Kingdom
Kent
Gillingham

Yongnuo Flash guns are a credible and well respected cheaper alternative to the branded speedlites. They also provide a range of triggers and receivers that will allow an off camera flash set-up. There are a range of TTL cables that connect off camera flash to camera and are a cheaper way into the world of off camera portrait flash photography and the most reliable option, but have limitations of range (separation of flash from camera).

I'd suggest that you need to think about some sort of light diffuser with this set up as even a dome clip on plastic diffuser that often comes with the flash can be an intense light source. Light stand too. If its a Fujifilm FinePix type camera check compatibility of the flash and triggers, its a great step forward though and a piece of kit that's almost essential and will over time become more and more useful.

Dominic.



John Woolley is off-line
03 December 2013 11:26
Johnmphoto
Photographer
Johnmphoto
Location
United Kingdom
Greater Manchester


I'v just got the Yongnuo 560 II and have used it about 3 times now, carn't fault it has a built in slave so i can fire it from my other flash canon and Bowens stick some velcro tabs on so that i can attach some coloured jells.



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