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Nikon D7000 & Bowens Flash

Kevin Wilson is off-lineSilver Member
01 September 2013 06:41
kerandastudio2
Studio
kerandastudio2
Location
United Kingdom
Norfolk
Kings Lynn

Having problems when shooting Nikon D7000 + Bowens studio flash, skin tones are flat and very orange.

D7000 is fine with Elinchrome flash, fine outside but as described with Bowens Gemini 500 heads, Pentax K10D is fine with the same Bowens heads.

Settings selected  White balance "flash setting " . Set picture control "SD" . Colour Space  " sRGB".

Anyone else had/having same problems ?


FlashBangWallop is off-lineSilver Member
01 September 2013 15:52
FlashBangWallop
Photographer
FlashBangWallop
Location
United Kingdom
Lancashire
Blackpool

Not noticed that on mine but to be honest rarely use it in studio. I prefer to set custom white balance - takes seconds to do.


Kevin Wilson is off-lineSilver Member
01 September 2013 16:37
kerandastudio2
Studio
kerandastudio2
Location
United Kingdom
Norfolk
Kings Lynn

Thanks Doug,
                      Yes I am fine both outdoor and with Elinchrome in the studio, is something to do with matching colour balance from Bowens heads with camera.
Another quirk is it seems worse on Transcend memory cards than on SanDisk but my guess is everyone will say thats coincidence, thanks for your comment.


Graham is off-lineSilver Member
01 September 2013 19:39
grahamsphotography
Photographer
grahamsphotography
Location
United Kingdom
West Sussex
Chichester


Set balance to daylight.


Aegean is off-lineSilver Member
06 September 2013 15:04
AegeanSoft
Photographer
AegeanSoft
Location
United Kingdom
Derbyshire


Quote from grahamsphotography

Set balance to daylight.



+1. Flash setting is too warm, daylight setting is spot on with my Bowens 500C

www.aegeansoft.com Adult and fetish web site designers photographers and video producers


Kevin Wilson is off-lineSilver Member
06 September 2013 15:29
kerandastudio2
Studio
kerandastudio2
Location
United Kingdom
Norfolk
Kings Lynn

Thanks guys , will experiment with daylight settings D7000 has three to choose from Direct Sunlight, Cloudy and Shade.
Since my original post I have improved results a bit by increasing to a colour temperature from 5000K TO 5880K this is closer to temperature output of the flash head.


raw and the cooked is online
17 September 2013 09:36
Rawandthecooked
Photographer

Location
United Kingdom
London


Dial in your own kelvin settings!


Will is off-line
17 September 2013 10:55
Photoimager
Photographer
Photoimager
Location
United Kingdom
Staffordshire
Stoke-on-Trent

Quote from kerandastudio2Settings selected  White balance "flash setting " .



That is your problem. If you were using an unmodified Nikon speedlight then the flash preset should be fine. As soon as you use a modifier on that flash ( diffuser dome, brolley etc ) or bounce it you are likely to be changing the colour temperature and tint. Presets are an approximation and, like all approximations, sometimes they will be close enough for some uses.

You cannot 'dial in the Kelvin' if you do not know what it is and colour meters are a little on the expensive side. As flash tubes age, their colour temperature will change. With cheaper lights, cheaper than the likes of ProFoto and Elinchrom's top models, Hensel and Bron you will get noticeable ( more so to some than to others ) changes in colour temperature at different power output levels. Change the modifier and the colour temperature can change. You cannot therefore rely on the quoted colour temperature of the flash unit.

For each change in lighting setup I do a custom in-camera white balance reading and back it up with a WB target photo that can be used in post to check the in-camera reading.
The proceedure:
- Use a purposely designed WB target - not a 'grey card', I use a Lastolite one as my usual choice but keep a small Calumet card in each bag in case I'm without the Lastolite one.
- Once your light levels are set get the model to hold it in front of where their face will be in the photo.
- On your D7000 hold down the WB button and turn the rear control wheel until the WB symbol on the top LCD is to the far right 'Pre' ( yes, Nikon has got it's terminology wrong using pre for preset when it is a custom setting )
- Release the WB button and then press it again and the 'Pre' will start flashing.
- Take a photo of your WB target filling as much of the frame as possible with the target but without obscuring the flash falling on the target. No photograph is actually taken, just a reading.
- The top plate LCD will now either be flashing 'Good' or 'No Good'. If 'No good' then open up your lens a couple of stops and try again. ( when taking the reading the system stops the lens down 2 stops more than you have set in order to aqvoid over exposure which will mess up the reading ), Presuming that gives you 'Good' make sure to return the aperture to your metered value. If you worry about the model thinking the target is strange, they will soon get used to it and might even be more impressed with you knowing what you are doing. On Saturday night at a cage fighting event I had not problem getting some of the participants to cooperate with this when setting up for their 'stare downs'.

 All of my Nikon DSLRs have worked in this way from D70 through to D800, the only variation has been the WB button on the D70 is on the back plate as opposed to the top plate of the other bodies I've had. Once you are used to it the process does not take any noticeable time and it saves a lot of time in post. These days I do not understand people when they are in control of the lighting and they do not use a custom WB reading. 'Fixing it in post' or using an approximate preset are non-starters for me if I am in control of the lighting.

Be aware, Canon manuals suggest white paper, three problems there:
- is the paper of a neutral white base ?
- Optical brighteners in the paper will shift the colours
- overexposure is more likely than on a grey and the reading will then be invalid bit you will probably not know it.

At a 3-day outdoor music festival I found that for the acts with mixed daylight and stage lighting the stage floor was a good neutral grey and both did a custom WB reading off that for each act. By the third day I had to find an alternative because the mud that was carried onto the stage meant finding a clean enough part was becoming too difficult.



Where there's a Will, there's a way.


Steven Jardine is onlinePlatinum Member
18 September 2013 02:46
RedChecker
Photographer
RedChecker
Location
United Kingdom
Buckinghamshire
Stoke Mandeville

Quote from Photoimager
With cheaper lights, cheaper than the likes of ProFoto and Elinchrom's top models, Hensel and Bron you will get noticeable ( more so to some than to others ) changes in colour temperature at different power output levels.




As the owner of both Profoto and Bowens gear I've found the variance with power level isn't so noticeable.  What is noticeable is the consistency from shot-to-shot where the Bowens units fluctuate quite wildly (+/- 300K between shots) wheras the Profoto is pretty stable (+/- 100K).  The actual output (brightness) also fluctuates somewhat worse with the Bowens (both phenomenon to be expected though due to the fact the Profoto is ~10x the cost).  Interestingly speedlites don't seem to suffer these variances from my experimentation.

Bowens are also quite 'warm' as flash heads go (say 2-300K lower (warmer) than my Profoto) when both using a standard ~7" reflector.

It should be noted that speedlites (any make) are generall a LOT 'colder' than studio flash (hence the discrepancy between the 'Flash' and 'Daylight' colour balances).  My own little experiments put my speedlites (Canon & Yonguo ones) at around 1200-1400K higher (colder) than the Profoto (which I consider to be spot-on neutral).  This wasn't an accurate figure, just an estimate but is something to bear in mind both when mixing with studio flash and daylight.
I prefer not to think before I speak. I like being just as surprised as everyone else by what comes out of my mouth.



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