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Google withdrawing EAS

CSD Images is off-line
16 December 2012 04:46
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Whilst this will affect predominantly Windows Phone it will also affect iOS users in the mobile space. On a wider aspect it could affect all e-mail clients as CardDAV and CalDAV are not widely supported, and the IMAP protocol that Google uses is non-standard but it does work on most e-mail clients you just don't get the advanced functionality Google baked into it. 

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/12/google-phasing-out-activesync-push-mail-for-free-customers/

What does it do? It gives push e-mail, calendar and other facilities syncing abilities to any device, it's probably one of the most widely used standards when it comes to mobile communications especially if you  want push e-mail (receive it on your phone as soon as it's in your inbox) and one click e-mail set up. On iOS it also gives advanced functionality to the calendar facilities such as meeting invites. .

An interesting article talking about eco-systems and the potential for all out  standards/eco-system wars:

http://www.theverge.com/2012/11/20/3669590/ecosystem-microsoft-apple-google-facebook-cold-war

It may seem a strange move by Google to pull a standard that's so useful, but this is part of the bigger picture as both Google and Microsoft was in a fued. With this move it's now broken out into open warfare. The people who are using it are now caught in the crossfire and it'll be interesting to see if Google will stick to its guns.
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EdT is off-line
16 December 2012 05:05
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Quote from CSD_Images
Whilst this will affect predominantly Windows Phone it will also affect iOS users in the mobile space. On a wider aspect it could affect all e-mail clients as CardDAV and CalDAV are not widely supported, and the IMAP protocol that Google uses is non-standard but it does work on most e-mail clients you just don't get the advanced functionality Google baked into it. 



Maybe worth mentioning that this will only affect gmail users.


Paul Cox is off-line
16 December 2012 09:42
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Well that's the end of me using Google sadly.


seanb is off-lineGold Member
16 December 2012 16:00
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As the article points out, it's odd that they're keeping it for paying apps customers which means they've got to keep maintaining it. Either it's going to be phased out for them in due course, or it's part of a gradual move towards making the free option less attractive.

I've found the EAS connector is definitely the best way to get push email to IOS devices - it works much better than IMAP push and even on Android the gmail app lags a bit in collecting email. Shame that users will be the ones losing out in the Apple/Microsoft/Google war.


http://www.seanbphotography.co.uk


CSD Images is off-line
16 December 2012 16:59
CSD_Images
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It's ironic that 12 years after Microsoft got slammed for being uncompetitive they are now the 'most' open company out there licensing their tech and being proponents of privacy. The real problem as someone pointed out to me isn't the OS but the control of Data Mining. Google has a vested interest gathering as much information about it's users as it can. That's why it built Android, they couldn't do it on Windows or OSX desktop as people didn't like the program snooping. It's the same with Windows Phone, which unlike iOS, doesn't allow the apps to data mine user information. iOS has improved but it still leaks a lot of data.

iOS users are essence a proxy user of Android/Google as many of the services on iOS are provided by Google and Apple is desperate to break that link, even to go as far as swap out the maps before they're fully cooked. Apple is fighting a rear guard action, they are losing users to Android and Windows Phone, they're holding on to the tablet market but it's only a matter of time before that starts to crumble unless they can break free of Google's or even Microsoft's services which won't happen any time soon.

Google is also feeling threatened I suspect as they're probably seeing Windows 8/Windows Phone 8 starting to make an impact (they are one of the few companies that probably can get an real idea of how many devices from web traffic). Out of the three companies the real threat isn't Apple but it's Microsoft as they're the only ones that has a full eco-system not just in the mobile or desktop, but also entertainment and business which competes directly with Google. The other problem for Google is that Android has been shown to have been built of stolen patents and even worse, apart from Samsung most companies using Android are losing money with their phones. Google really needs to address these issues as if they lose HTC and the other phone manufacturers then could lose a very important leverage point.

Microsoft has stated they want to play fair, and so far they lived by that, it's Apple and Google that's causing the issues both of which started this war. Twitter has also alienated it's users, and Instagram has done the same when it removed services from third parties.

2013 is going to be a very interesting year for technology and gadgets.
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w4pictures is off-line
17 December 2012 18:24
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So does that mean that, on a computer basis rather than a phone one, you are less likely to be tracked using Explorer than Google Chrome?

I am so bored with the blinking adverts on unrelated websites for something I looked at and have long since bought and so am not interested in any more. Its intrusive to say the least.

Its interesting that we, and I am as guilty as anyone, look at devices as to what they will do for us regardless of the posturing and litigation of the US giants over infringements and legal cases which may alter the facilities into which we think we have bought in a matter of months.


Paul Cox is off-line
18 December 2012 02:50
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Quote from seanb
As the article points out, it's odd that they're keeping it for paying apps customers which means they've got to keep maintaining it. Either it's going to be phased out for them in due course, or it's part of a gradual move towards making the free option less attractive.



I've found the EAS connector is definitely the best way to get push email to IOS devices - it works much better than IMAP push and even on Android the gmail app lags a bit in collecting email. Shame that users will be the ones losing out in the Apple/Microsoft/Google war.



Not mentioned by the OP or in the linked article but clearly stated in the blog post is that they are not stopping the use of it for anyone, they are simply stopping you setting up a new device. It wil be interesting to see whether this would stop, for example, someone upgrading their iphone continuing to use it as they wil presumably simply restore what was backed up from their old phone.


CSD Images is off-line
18 December 2012 03:19
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@Paul

From what I gather if Google perceives it as a new device then you won't be able to set up e-mail, if you have a EAS account active then you will continue to use it that way whether from back ups or from an existing device. This also only affects free users and not businesses who will have to pay for the privilege of about $50 a year.

@W4Pictures,

Yes, this is why Chromium was introduced to try and prevent Google spying on you, all their services have some form of telemetrics built into them to learn what the users do. On the other hand Microsoft has little or no interest in this kind of spying because they're not an advertising company, the only telemetrics they gather are application usage patterns and you have to opt in to those.

You have also have HTML 5 storage and cookies which track you amongst other deciding factors, and why I often use a privacy mode when searching the web. The EU is conducting a investigation about privacy and what not, but probably nothing will come of it.

www.flickr.com/photos/csd_images | www.celticshadows.co.uk


18 December 2012 03:40
ScottishGeek
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It's interesting also that Sky are moving their email service from Google to Yahoo in April of next year. Not had time to look into what this means in the real world yet though.
"Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst." – Henri Cartier-Bresson



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